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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:06 pm 
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Talk about Boxing in all sorts, all of a sudden I have been figuring this out and I've been thinking about this a lot lately and sometimes tends to keep me awake at night on what's really worth more? I was wondering maybe you guys can help me tell what is undoubtedly much weighty?

Let me give you my views. For someone who have no other choice and choose boxing as his career, make his living on it, then becoming a world champion is all well and good for himself and for his country.
But there seemed to be no end to the alphabet titles. What was once a world championship per weight division has turned into multitudinous of alphabet soup depending on each boxing organization, each of these has their own labyrinthine sets of rules, we know it has full of all kinds of odds and ends.

So I think competing in boxing for your country such as Asian Games, USA Amateur Boxing, European Championships, Boxing World Cup, World Series Boxing, World Amateur Boxing Championships and so on has more pride and worth, let alone winning an Olympic Gold Medal. This is probably the greatest accomplishment of all by any athlete considering against overwhelming odds that fighter might be going or getting through. In Olympic Games it's the best of the best, a lot of country tries hard in the world qualification tournaments only to find its stiffest competition in the mirror and never qualify. Thus, some boxing media, fans and critiques belittle these world championships belts by labeling them as 'alphabet soup' titles or trinkets, some people says those championship belts are a joke.

I'm wondering now whether Vasyl Lomachenko values his 2 Professional Boxing championship belts in 2 weight classses (to think he got these in his 7 pro fights) above of his 5 Gold and 1 Silver Medals in the Amateur Boxing which included his 2 Olympic Gold Medals.
I don't think so.

Roy Jones Jr. and Floyd Maywether Jr. respectively were eluded to get an Olympic Gold. So thats how hard to get a gold medal. Speaking of the Packyman, he would have been always the first casualty on the early elimination if he was in the Asian Games or in the Olympics. Former president of Association of Boxing Alliances in the Philippines (ABAP) Manny Lopez once said, “When I saw Pacquiao, we already saw his style was not suited for amateur and he was going to be a successful boxer once he goes professional which he did,”.

Now I think Floyd Mayweather Jr.'s Olympic Bronze Medal and Roy Jones Jr.'s Olympic Silver Medal were just equivalent to Packyman's 8 weight professional boxing's alphabet soup belts. Even some respectable boxing people says those were craps.

On this stand, are you guys with me?

I would appreciate if you share your views, comments or opinions about this topic.

_________________
Netizens: "Paano ba makakaahon ang Pinas kung ang pangulo ay walang paninindigan, duwag, traydor, inutil, sinungaling, sakitin, sira ulo, kriminal at magnanakaw?"
Duterpwe: “sinabi ko na sa inyo na wag nyo ako iboto."
Dutertards: nganga


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:13 pm 
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Navigating Boxing's Alphabet Titles (AKA The Idi ot's Guide to Stupidity) Part 1: The WBA
by Brickhaus Jun 22, 2010, 12:08pm EDT

One of the big complaints many people have about the current state of affairs in boxing is that there are just too many titles these days. Way back when, there was a champion, people knew who the champion was, and a fan could figure out who was in line to fight for that championship. Over the course of the last 50 years, and especially in the last 25, a collective of sanctioning bodies colloquially known as the alphabet soup has come into play. What was once a championship has turned into no less than four major titles, a number of fringe titles and at least two means of considering who might be the "real" champion. Each of these has their own convoluted sets of rules.

It's tough to get a straight story as to who does what, and hopefully this series of articles will help illuminate . This article might not be 100% accurate (especially if you're reading it long after it was written), but I'm hoping this is about as comprehensive of a series as there is out there on the various ABC titles and how a fighter can obtain them. I'm hoping this will lead off a new section where I discuss various aspects of the business of boxing. First, we'll start with the granddaddy of the ABC's, the WBA.

World Boxing Association (WBA)

The oldest of the sanctioning bodies, a look at how the WBA started gives us a small glimpse as to why these organizations even exist, and what their original intent was. In 1921, the WBA started as the NBA, an association of 14 boxing commissions around the United States. Before that time, the New York State Athletic Commission was developing somewhat of a stranglehold on prizefighting in the U.S., and for many decades, the New York champion was also considered to be the world champion, or at least a world champion.

At this point, the main purpose was to provide an orderly system for champions to fight contenders and to name new world champions, and for many years, the NBA did just that. In 1962, it changed its name to the WBA and started allowing in foreign boxing commissions. However, before long, other countries saw how unfair it was that each U.S. state would have a seat at the table while each other country would only get one seat. This eventually led to some internal strife, the splitting off of the WBC and later the IBF, and eventually the WBA getting dominated by Latin American interests, which continues to this day.

Despite having opportunities to completely rework its rules, the current WBA may do more to muddy the waters than any other organization, which is exactly the opposite of its original purpose. Rather than having only one championship, the WBA often claims to have as many as four:

Super champion: The WBA claims, per its rules, that only a unified titlist or a person who makes five to ten defenses of their title can become super champion. However, it's added circumstances as it sees fit, and even the rule that it can elevate a champion after only five defenses is a new addition. If a WBA regular champion also becomes a WBC, IBF or WBO champion, then he's elevated to super champion. It's a win-win for the WBA - they give super champions longer times to make mandatory defenses, so they don't look bad for stripping fighters, and it also allows the WBA to make a grab for more cash by having twice as many "title" fights.
Regular champion: You know, the guy who's actually the titlist. Except when there's a super champion. Then, the regular champion is something less than a champion. He can still strut around calling himself the man, but in reality, if there's a super champion, then the regular champion isn't even the champion for his own sanctioning body.
Interim champion: Officially, under the WBA rules, the only way you can have an interim champion is if there's a champion in recess, e.g. the titlist can't defend because he's injured or there are some other extenuating circumstances. In reality, there are currently six interim titlists, and all of the real champs are perfectly able to fight. The WBA gets more sanctioning fees from having an interim title fight instead of a title eliminator, so as a way to steal more money, they have slowly been replacing title eliminators with fights for an interim title.
Champion in Recess: According to the WBA rules, when an active champion is unable to defend his title within the prescribed time period for debilitating medical reasons, legal reasons or any other legitimate reason, the WBA can make him champion in recess and appoint an interim titlist. Good example: Ruslan Chagaev was unable to fight because of hepatitis, so he was made champion in recess. Not so good example: Felix Sturm is caught in a legal battle over his contract, so the WBA made him super champion instead of champion in recess.
A WBA titlist, like the other major titles, may only make defenses against someone ranked in the WBA's top 15, unless the WBA otherwise approves the fight. Rankings are determined by a committee of three to five members, all of whom are appointed by the President of the WBA. As is the case with most of the alphabet organizations, this leaves the rankings ripe for manipulation and, in some cases, straight up fraud. With as few as three people voting, there isn't necessarily the proper information to determine who are the 15 best fighters in a weight class worldwide. Also, like the other sanctioning bodies, they will not rank a champion for another sanctioning body. The committee can also name a mandatory contender, or set a fight to determine a mandatory contender. Once a mandatory is named, the titlist has a limited amount of time to defend against the mandatory before risking losing his belt.

Just to provide an example of the WBA's convoluted stupidity when it comes to its titles, look at the current WBA featherweight title situation. Way back in 2003, Chris John won the interim title by beating Oscar Leon. The real title was held by Derrick Gainer. However, when Gainer was beaten by Juan Manuel Marquez in a unification fight, Marquez was made the super champion, and the WBA elevated John to regular champion without so much as needing to fight. For almost three years, Marquez defends his title and John defends his. John's managers are screaming that they want their mandatory with Marquez, which is supposedly due in 18 months, but because Marquez is a little famous and John is not, the two don't actually fight until Marquez refuses a rematch with Manny Pacquiao because he felt lowballed.

Finally, in March 2006, Marquez fights John, who defeats Marquez. Even though Marquez was super champion, John just stays regular champion by beating Marquez, since Marquez was stripped by the IBF before he fought John. In April 2009, even though John was still healthy and fighting, the WBA decides that one titlist just isn't enough, and sanctions a fight between Yuriorkis Gamboa and Jose Rojas for the interim title. A few months later, the WBA elevates Chris John to super champion for little apparent reason, and elevates Gamboa from interim titlist to regular titlist without so much as needing to fight.

So now there are two healthy, active WBA champions, so what does the WBA decide to do? Sanction ANOTHER title. The battle between Celestino Caballero and Daud Yordan was supposed to be for the WBA interim title, but Caballero forgot to pay his fees, so now some other poor cads, probably nobody ranked in the WBA's top 5, will get a shot at becoming interim titlist. And all the while, there are two healthy, active "champions", and nobody seems to be in any hurry to get any of them to fight each other or the supposed WBA mandatory, Daniel Ponce de Leon. With sanctioning fees of up to $150,000 per fighter, depending on the size of the purse, that's a lot of coin that can end up in the WBA's pocket.

Simple, see??


http://www.badlefthook.com/2010/6/22/1509399/navigating-boxings-alphabet-titles

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Duterpwe: “sinabi ko na sa inyo na wag nyo ako iboto."
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:20 pm 
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Keep Punching wrote:
Talk about Boxing in all sorts, all of a sudden I have been figuring this out and I've been thinking about this a lot lately and sometimes tends to keep me awake at night on what's really worth more? I was wondering maybe you guys can help me tell what is undoubtedly much weighty?

Let me give you my views. For someone who have no other choice and choose boxing as his career, make his living on it, then becoming a world champion is all well and good for himself and for his country.
But there seemed to be no end to the alphabet titles. What was once a world championship per weight division has turned into multitudinous of alphabet soup depending on each boxing organization, each of these has their own labyrinthine sets of rules, we know it has full of all kinds of odds and ends.

So I think competing in boxing for your country such as Asian Games, USA Amateur Boxing, European Championships, Boxing World Cup, World Series Boxing, World Amateur Boxing Championships and so on has more pride and worth, let alone winning an Olympic Gold Medal. This is probably the greatest accomplishment of all by any athlete considering against overwhelming odds that fighter might be going or getting through. In Olympic Games it's the best of the best, a lot of country tries hard in the world qualification tournaments only to find its stiffest competition in the mirror and never qualify. Thus, some boxing media, fans and critiques belittle these world championships belts by labeling them as 'alphabet soup' titles or trinkets, some people says those championship belts are a joke.

I'm wondering now whether Vasyl Lomachenko values his 2 Professional Boxing championship belts in 2 weight classses (to think he got these in his 7 pro fights) above of his 5 Gold and 1 Silver Medals in the Amateur Boxing which included his 2 Olympic Gold Medals.
I don't think so.

Roy Jones Jr. and Floyd Maywether Jr. respectively were eluded to get an Olympic Gold. So thats how hard to get a gold medal. Speaking of the Packyman, he would have been always the first casualty on the early elimination if he was in the Asian Games or in the Olympics. Former president of Association of Boxing Alliances in the Philippines (ABAP) Manny Lopez once said, “When I saw Pacquiao, we already saw his style was not suited for amateur and he was going to be a successful boxer once he goes professional which he did,”.

Now I think Floyd Mayweather Jr.'s Olympic Bronze Medal and Roy Jones Jr.'s Olympic Silver Medal were just equivalent to Packyman's 8 weight professional boxing's alphabet soup belts. Even some respectable boxing people says those were craps.

On this stand, are you guys with me?

I would appreciate if you share your views, comments or opinions about this topic.


pacquiao will destroy even the best amatuer if you put him against them even when he was young
a 16 year old pacquiao will ko lomachenko

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:35 pm 
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I think Lomachenko's World Championships Silver Medal will be enough to outshine Packyman's 8 weight alphabet soup belts.

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Netizens: "Paano ba makakaahon ang Pinas kung ang pangulo ay walang paninindigan, duwag, traydor, inutil, sinungaling, sakitin, sira ulo, kriminal at magnanakaw?"
Duterpwe: “sinabi ko na sa inyo na wag nyo ako iboto."
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Last edited by Keep Punching on Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:39 pm 
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FunkyDog wrote:
Keep Punching wrote:
Talk about Boxing in all sorts, all of a sudden I have been figuring this out and I've been thinking about this a lot lately and sometimes tends to keep me awake at night on what's really worth more? I was wondering maybe you guys can help me tell what is undoubtedly much weighty?

Let me give you my views. For someone who have no other choice and choose boxing as his career, make his living on it, then becoming a world champion is all well and good for himself and for his country.
But there seemed to be no end to the alphabet titles. What was once a world championship per weight division has turned into multitudinous of alphabet soup depending on each boxing organization, each of these has their own labyrinthine sets of rules, we know it has full of all kinds of odds and ends.

So I think competing in boxing for your country such as Asian Games, USA Amateur Boxing, European Championships, Boxing World Cup, World Series Boxing, World Amateur Boxing Championships and so on has more pride and worth, let alone winning an Olympic Gold Medal. This is probably the greatest accomplishment of all by any athlete considering against overwhelming odds that fighter might be going or getting through. In Olympic Games it's the best of the best, a lot of country tries hard in the world qualification tournaments only to find its stiffest competition in the mirror and never qualify. Thus, some boxing media, fans and critiques belittle these world championships belts by labeling them as 'alphabet soup' titles or trinkets, some people says those championship belts are a joke.

I'm wondering now whether Vasyl Lomachenko values his 2 Professional Boxing championship belts in 2 weight classses (to think he got these in his 7 pro fights) above of his 5 Gold and 1 Silver Medals in the Amateur Boxing which included his 2 Olympic Gold Medals.
I don't think so.

Roy Jones Jr. and Floyd Maywether Jr. respectively were eluded to get an Olympic Gold. So thats how hard to get a gold medal. Speaking of the Packyman, he would have been always the first casualty on the early elimination if he was in the Asian Games or in the Olympics. Former president of Association of Boxing Alliances in the Philippines (ABAP) Manny Lopez once said, “When I saw Pacquiao, we already saw his style was not suited for amateur and he was going to be a successful boxer once he goes professional which he did,”.

Now I think Floyd Mayweather Jr.'s Olympic Bronze Medal and Roy Jones Jr.'s Olympic Silver Medal were just equivalent to Packyman's 8 weight professional boxing's alphabet soup belts. Even some respectable boxing people says those were craps.

On this stand, are you guys with me?

I would appreciate if you share your views, comments or opinions about this topic.


pacquiao will destroy even the best amatuer if you put him against them even when he was young
a 16 year old pacquiao will ko lomachenko


I don't think so. Olympic Bronze Medalist Floyd easily outboxed the Packyman and beat the shitout of him and Lomachenko has too much to offer for him.

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Duterpwe: “sinabi ko na sa inyo na wag nyo ako iboto."
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:59 pm 
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a brave salido bullied and outpointed lomachengco
its like watching kwame brown schooling kobe bryant

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:18 pm 
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FunkyDog wrote:
a brave salido bullied and outpointed lomachengco
its like watching kwame brown schooling kobe bryant


Salido was a sham, the ref and the judges cheated Lomachenko.

Inexperienced and used to a clean fight Loma outlanded Salido tho and made him in trouble in the later rounds.

Erika Montoya had tweeted me this.
Image
https://twitter.com/lakiks/status/439976567951749120

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:25 pm 
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Keep Punching wrote:
I think Lomachenko's World Championships Silver Medal will be enough to outshine Packyman's 8 weight alphabet soup belts.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:51 pm 
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An Olympic gold has more weight than a belt. But if you are a 12x belt holder and the only 5 lineal and 8 weight division champ like Pacman then that's means the whole world!


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 3:02 pm 
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nonongsanmateo wrote:
An Olympic gold has more weight than a belt. But if you are a 12x belt holder and the only 5 lineal and 8 weight division champ like Pacman then that's means the whole world!


Damn, having 5 Golds and 1 Silver is like owning a universe.
To think Olympic Games are held every four years.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:11 pm 
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PRO>Amateur


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:21 pm 
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juice miyo!!

there are so many boxing gold medalists in the olympics

there is only one 8-division champion in boxing



ambobo mo ts :biglaugh: :biglaugh: :biglaugh:

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:43 pm 
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not an athlete pero based sa nababasa ko at napapanood parang mas mahirap makakuha ng gold medal.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:50 pm 
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Romy Nabas wrote:
juice miyo!!

there are so many boxing gold medalists in the olympics but packyman ain't got one.

there is only one cherry-picker 8-division champion in boxing.



ambobo ko ts :biglaugh: :biglaugh: :biglaugh:



Yup, I have to agree with you.


Here to support my claim:

Manny Pacquiao – Not an Eight-Division Champ?
May 29th, 2014

By Anthony Mason: All boxing fans have heard it by now. Manny Pacquiao is the only man to be an eight-division champion. However, this accomplishment is only true in name, not in value or substance in my opinion. It is true that after Bernard Hopkins’ middleweight reign ended, that Pacquiao, along with Floyd Mayweather, is one of the greatest boxers of this era.

I see it as false, however, to consider Manny Pacquiao to be a legitimate eight-division champion. To see why this is the case it is important to closely examine Pacquiao’s titles and what he accomplished in each weight class. Then after putting this in historical context it will be possible to objectively rank the value of Pacquiao’s multiple championships.

First of all, it is important to note that a title is only worth as much as the fighter that one defeated, and the manner in which they won the title. Muhammad Ali’s knockout of a prime George Foreman is obviously a much more legitimate claim to the heavyweight title than Shannon Briggs’ controversial decision over a much older, slower, and past prime George Foreman who was three years removed from fighting an elite opponent.

Secondly, the value of belts themselves is not important in today’s watered down era. Canelo Alvarez and Erislandy Lara will not be fighting for an official title, but it would be hard to deny the winner’s status as a great fighter even without a championship. It is clear that in today’s era, belts are not the indicator of a great fighter.

It is imperative to recognize the diminished value of being a multi-division champion as well as holding a title or belt in today’s era. There are 68 belts available in 17 weight classes, not including minor titles. The fact that the likes of Sakio Bika or Peter Quillin are considered champions in today’s era is proof that a belt does not make a legitimate champion. There is no way that the likes of Quillin could be mentioned alongside legitimate champions such as Carlos Monzon, Marvin Hagler, or Sugar Ray Robinson simply because they all held a middleweight title at one point

Now back to the lecture at hand. Perfection is perfected so I’m going to let you understand. Let us look at Pacquiaos “championships” class by class.

First weight class – Flyweight (112 lbs)
Starting with his flyweight reign, it is clear that Manny Pacquiao did not defeat one elite fighter at 112 pounds. The illegitimacy of Pacquiao’s flyweight title is proven by Pacquiao’s knockout loss to Medgoen Singsurat. Pacquiao with the skills of his prime form would have easily defeated Singsurat, but in 1999 it was proven that at the moment Pacquiao was far from elite. There is no way Pacquiao beat anyone that could legitimize him as a champion at the time of his flyweight career when he could not even get past Singsurat. If it wasn’t for the four belts available in each weight class and the incredible weakness of the division, Manny would not have held this illegitimate piece of the flyweight title.

Second weight class – Super Bantamweight (122 lbs)
Pacquiao immediately jumped from flyweight to super bantamweight in 1999. In Manny’s super bantamweight run, he once again did not defeat one elite fighter. The minor WBC international belt that Pacquiao won at 122 pounds clearly cannot be seen as legitimate. Pacquiao only held onto the IBF portion of the 122 title, and he won this by defeating Lehlo Ledwaba. Although undefeated, Ledwaba had not defeated one elite fighter. Pacquiao defended his super bantamweight belt against more unimpressive competition, and even was held to a draw in a technical decision against a very rough and dirty fighter in Agapito Sanchez, another far from elite fighter. To this point, Pacquiao was in actuality a zero-division champion with his titles put in context.

Third weight class – Feathweight (126 lbs)
It was not until defeating the great Marco Antonio Barrera at featherweight that Pacquiao truly became a champion. Barrera, unlike Singsurat, Ledwaba, or Sanchez, was a great fighter and the victory over Barrera coming off wins against Hamed, Morales, and Tapia definitely legitimized Pacquiao as a champion. At 126 pounds, Pacquiao finally became a truly legitimate champion for the first time.

Fourth weight class – Super Featherweight (130 lbs)
At super featherweight, Pacquiao once again established himself as the legitimate champion. At first, he held the fake WBC International title, but did score great wins over Erik Morales (twice) and Barrera once more. In his first fight against Marquez, Pacquiao established a legitimate claim to being a champion. This was a very close fight that could be scored either way, so a case can definitely be made for Pacquiao, as well as Marquez, being a true 130 lb champion.

Fifth weight class – Lightweight (135 lbs)
At lightweight, Pacquiao had one fight against a very weak paper champion belt holder in David Diaz. Diaz did nothing other than beat a leftover past prime and washed up Erik Morales. If that makes David Diaz a great fighter, then Trevor Berbick must be one of the great heavyweights for beating an extremely shot Muhammad Ali. There is no way Pacquiao was a legitimate champion at 135 lbs. By this point, Pacquiao was only a legitimate champion in two divisions.

Sixth weight class – Light Welterweight (140 lbs)
Although Ricky Hatton is an extremely overrated fighter, (his greatest accomplishment is beating Kosta Tzyu, a man who did nothing other than defeat Zab Judah, a man renown for losing every big fight he was ever in) the manner in which Pacquiao defeated him and Hatton’s still solid (but not remarkable) status earn Pacquiao just enough to be considered a legitimate champion in a third division.

Seventh weight class – Welterweight (147 lbs)
A past his prime Paccquiao defeating a prime Tim Bradley, twice in reality, is more than enough to legitimize Pacquiao’s claim to a fourth legitimate division title.

Eighth weight class – Junior Middleweight (154 lbs)
Pacquiao’s only fight at 154 was not even at 154 pounds. It took place at 150 lbs against a well past his prime Antonio Margarito. Margarito never established himself as a legitimate 154 fighter. He lost every fight at 154 other than a weak opponent in Roberto Garcia. This title is the very definition of illegitimate.

So, a short summary of Pacquiao’s weight climbing reign

Flyweight – no elite competition, proved by Singsurat as an illegitimate championship
Super Bantamweight – no elite competition
Featherweight – great win against Barrera (First true division title)
Super Featherweight – Marquez, Morales, and Barrera (Second true division title)
Lightweight – no elite competition. David Diaz being extremely weak
Light Welterweight – Ricky Hatton (Third true title)
Welterweight – Tim Bradley alone is enough to be a legitimate welterweight champ (Fourth true title)
Jr Middleweight – Manny never fought at 154 pounds. Margarito never beat one solid fighter at 154 pounds
Now that we have looked at Pacquiao’s career objectively and eliminated the smoke and mirrors caused by the large quantity of paper belts and addition of extra weight class, it is clear the by today’s weight class standards, Pacquiao can lay claim to being a four-division legitimate champion. No small achievement by any means, but definitely not as remarkable as a true eight-division champion would be.


Now, let’s look at this in historical context. At the time of the great Henry Armstrong, only eight weight classes existed with one belt per class. With the elimination of junior and super weight classes that did not exist in Henry Armstrong’s day, Pacquiao would have championships in two weight classes (Featherweight and Welterweight), and this is assuming that Manny is fighting Tim Bradley or Marco Antonio Barrera quality opposition in the old days. This is also only if we assume that Pacquiao does not fight as actively as Henry Armstrong, who on average competed once a month.

Armstrong held three belts simultaneously at featherweight, lightweight, and welterweight. If it were not for a robbery against Ceferino Garcia at middleweight (a fight in which Armstrong came in weighing less than a welterweight) Armstrong would have been and should be considered a four-division champ. And this is not taking into consideration the expansion of weight classes in the modern era. If a super featherweight, super lightweight, and super welterweight division existed in Armstrong’s day, he would be a SEVEN-divison legitimate champion by today’s standards, not factoring in that Armstrong faced vastly superior and oversized competition in his day such as Fritzie Zivic, Barney Ross, and Ceferino Garcia.

Imagine today’s top featherweight, Johny Gonzalez, going up to lightweight to beat Gamboa and Crawford, going up to welterweight to beat Mayweather and Pacquiao, and then moving up to middleweight and defeating Sergio Martinez and Gennady Golovkin. This only gives us a glimpse of how great Henry Armstrong was.

Another example is Sugar Ray Robinson. Robinson defeated Sammy Angott in 1941, but Angott’s lightweight title was not on the line. Two years later, Angott would end Willie Pep’s undefeated streak. Ray Robinson dominated 147 and 160, and if not for a heat stroke would have defeated Joey Maxim for the 175 title. If Angott’s title was on the line and if Robinson did not suffer a heat stroke, he would have been a four-division champion. By today’s standards including the additional super/junior weight classes, Robinson would also have claim to being a seven division legitimate champion, not factoring in the watered down competition of today’s era where men like Quillin, Bika, Ortiz, and Guerrero can be considered belt holders.

With Sugar Ray, you could compare him to a situation where the lightweight Yuriorkis Gamboa could beat Terence Crawford, Mayweather, Pacquiao, Martinez, and Golovkin, then moving up to 168 and 175 to defeat Andre Ward, Adonis Stevenson and Bernard Hopkins. Even that does not begin to describe the greatness of Walker Smith Jr. Clearly weight climbing in the old days with less titles and weight classes was a lot more incredible.

It is so misleading to simply go by numbers and statistics that claim someone is a X-division world champion. When they are put in context, the deception is erased. Pacquiao is a good fighter, but his accomplishments put him only in the company of the likes of Floyd Mayweather, not among the all time greats.




http://www.boxingnews24.com/2014/05/manny-pacquiao-not-an-eight-division-champ/

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:58 pm 
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Light Heavyweight

Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 10:08 am
Posts: 1634
dynamosparks wrote:
not an athlete pero based sa nababasa ko at napapanood parang mas mahirap makakuha ng gold medal.



The Philippines was sending their athletes to compete at the Olympic Games since 1924 but nada, they are being eluded by Olympic Gold.

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