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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 6:42 pm 
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Maybe Manny need strenght and conditioning program after all

http://www.doghouseboxing.com/John/Raspanti_121712.htm


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 7:50 pm 
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The core of steroids is composed of twenty carbon atoms bonded together that take the form of four fused rings: three cyclohexane rings (designated as rings A, B, and C in the figure to the right) and one cyclopentane ring (the D ring). The steroids vary by the functional groups attached to this four-ring core and by the oxidation state of the rings. Sterols are special forms of steroids, with a hydroxyl group at position-3 and a skeleton derived from cholestane.[1]
Hundreds of distinct steroids are found in plants, animals, and fungi. All steroids are made in cells either from the sterols lanosterol (animals and fungi) or from cycloartenol (plants). Both lanosterol and cycloartenol are derived from the cyclization of the triterpene squalene.[2]
Contents [hide]
1 Structure
2 Classification
2.1 Taxonomical/functional
2.2 Structural
3 Biosynthesis
3.1 Mevalonate pathway
3.1.1 Pharmacology
3.2 DMAPP to lanosterol
3.3 Steroidogenesis
3.4 Regulation
3.5 Alternative pathways
4 Metabolism
5 See also
6 References
7 External links
[edit]Structure

Steroids are a class of organic compounds with a chemical structure that contains the core of gonane or a skeleton derived therefrom. Usually, methyl groups are present at the carbons C-10 and C-13 – an alkyl side-chain at carbon C-17 may also be present.


The basic skeleton of a steroid, with standard stereo orientation. R is a side-chain at C-17.


Cholesterol. This steroid is the precursor to other steroids in the steroidogenesis.
Gonane is the simplest possible steroid and is composed of seventeen carbon atoms, bonded together to form four fused rings. The three cyclohexane rings (designated as rings A, B, and C in the figure below) form the skeleton of phenanthrene; ring D has a cyclopentane structure. Hence, together they are called cyclopentaphenanthrene.[3]


Numbering of rings and of carbon atoms in gonane, the simplest possible steroid.


The structure of cholestane, one of the comparatively simpler steroids.


The complexer structure of cholic acid, a bile acid.
Commonly, steroids have a methyl group at the carbons C-10 and C-13 and an alkyl side chain at carbon C-17. Further, they vary by the configuration of the side chain, the number of additional methyl groups, and the functional groups attached to the rings. For example, sterols have a hydroxyl group attached at position C-3.
Some exemplary steroids with their structures:


The anabolic steroid testosterone, the principal male sex hormone.


Progesterone, a steroid hormone involved in the female menstrual cycle, pregnancy and embryogenesis.


Medrogestone, a synthetic drug with similar effects as progesterone.


An example of functional groups is the hydroxyl group at C-3 common to sterols.


β-Sitosterol, a phytosterol showing the hydroxyl group at C-3.
[edit]Classification

[edit]Taxonomical/functional
Some of the common categories of steroids:
Animal
Insect
Ecdysteroids such as ecdysterone that controls moulting
Vertebrate
Steroid hormones
Sex steroids are a subset of sex hormones that produce sex differences or support reproduction. They include androgens, estrogens, and progestagens.
Corticosteroids include glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. Glucocorticoids regulate many aspects of metabolism and immune function, whereas mineralocorticoids help maintain blood volume and control renal excretion of electrolytes. Most medical 'steroid' drugs are corticosteroids.
Anabolic steroids are a class of steroids that interact with androgen receptors to increase muscle and bone synthesis. There are natural and synthetic anabolic steroids. In popular language, the word "steroids" usually refers to anabolic steroids.
Cholesterol, which modulates the fluidity of cell membranes and is the principal constituent of the plaques implicated in atherosclerosis.
Plant
Phytosterols
Brassinosteroids (includes several plant hormones)
Fungus
Ergosterols
[edit]Structural
It is also possible to classify steroids based upon their chemical composition. One example of how MeSH performs this classification is available at the Wikipedia MeSH catalog. Examples from this classification include:
Class Examples Number of carbon atoms
Cholestanes cholesterol 27
Cholanes cholic acid 24
Pregnanes progesterone 21
Androstanes testosterone 19
Estranes estradiol 18
Gonane (or steroid nucleus) is the parent (17-carbon tetracyclic) hydrocarbon molecule without any alkyl sidechains.[4]
[edit]Biosynthesis

Steroid biosynthesis is an anabolic metabolic pathway that produces steroids from simple precursors. A unique biosynthetic pathway is followed in animals compared to many other organisms, making the pathway a common target for antibiotics and other anti-infective drugs. In addition, steroid metabolism in humans is the target of cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins.


Simplified version of latter part of steroid synthesis pathway, where the intermediates isopentenyl pyrophosphate (PP or IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) form geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP), squalene and, finally, lanosterol, the first steroid in the pathways. Some intermediates are omitted for clarity.

In humans and other animals, the biosynthesis of steroids follows the mevalonate pathway that uses acetyl-CoA as building-blocks to form dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP).[5] In subsequent steps, DMAPP and IPP are joined to form geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP), which in turn is used to synthesize the steroid lanosterol. Further modifications of lanosterol into other steroids are classified steroidogenesis transformations.
[edit]Mevalonate pathway
Main article: Mevalonate pathway
The mevalonate pathway or HMG-CoA reductase pathway starts with and ends with dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP).


Mevalonate pathway

[edit]Pharmacology
A number of drugs target the mevalonate pathway:
Statins (used for elevated cholesterol levels)
Bisphosphonates (used in treatment of various bone-degenerative diseases)
[edit]DMAPP to lanosterol
Isopentenyl pyrophosphate and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate donate isoprene units, which are assembled and modified to form terpenes and isoprenoids,[6] which are a large class of lipids that include the carotenoids, and form the largest class of plant natural products.[7]
Here, the isoprene units are joined together to make squalene and then folded up and formed into a set of rings to make lanosterol.[8] Lanosterol can then be converted into other steroids such as cholesterol and ergosterol.[8][9]
[edit]Steroidogenesis
"Steroidogenesis" redirects here.
Steroidogenesis is the biological process by which steroids are generated from cholesterol and transformed into other steroids.[10] The pathways of steroidogenesis differ between different species – as an example the pathways of human steroidogenesis are shown in this figure below:


The human steroidogenesis, with the major classes of steroid hormones, individual steroids and enzymatic pathways. Note that changes in molecular structure compared to the respective precursor are highlighted with white circles.

The major classes of steroid hormones and some prominent members of the human steroidogenesis are:
Progestogens:
Progesterone
Corticosteroids (Corticoids):
Aldosterone (Mineralocorticoids)
Cortisol (Glucocorticoids)
Androgens:
Testosterone
Estrogens:
Estrogen
Locations of human steroidogenesis:
Progestogens serve as precursors to all other human steroids – thus all human tissues which produce steroids must first convert cholesterol to pregnenolone. This conversion is the rate-limiting step of steroid synthesis, which occurs inside the mitochondrion of the respective tissue.[11]
Corticosteroids are produced in the adrenal cortex.
Estrogen and progesterone are made primarily in the ovary and in the placenta during pregnancy, and testosterone in the testes.
Testosterone is also converted into estrogen to regulate the supply of each, in the bodies of both females and males.
In addition, certain neurons and glia in the central nervous system (CNS) express the enzymes that are required for the local synthesis of pregnane neurosteroids, either de novo or from peripherally-derived sources.
[edit]Regulation
Several key enzymes can be activated through DNA transcriptional regulation on activation of SREBP (Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein-1 and -2). This intracellular sensor detects low cholesterol levels and stimulates endogenous production by the HMG-CoA reductase pathway, as well as increasing lipoprotein uptake by up-regulating the LDL receptor. Regulation of this pathway is also achieved by controlling the rate of translation of the mRNA, degradation of reductase and phosphorylation.
[edit]Alternative pathways
In plants and bacteria, the non-mevalonate pathway uses pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as substrates.[6][12]
[edit]Metabolism

Steroids are oxidized mainly by cytochrome P450 oxidase enzymes, such as CYP3A4. These reactions introduce oxygen into the steroid ring and allows the structure to be broken up by other enzymes, to form bile acids as final products.[13] These bile acids can then be eliminated through secretion from the liver in the bile.[14] The expression of this oxidase gene can be upregulated by the steroid sensor PXR when there is a high blood concentration of steroids.[15]
[edit]See also

pharmacology portal
Batrachotoxin
List of steroid abbreviations
Steroid hormone
Corticosteroid
Sex steroid
Steroid sulfatase
Steroid hydroxylases
Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein
[edit]References

^ a b G. P. Moss (1989). "Nomenclature of Steroids (Recommendations 1989)". Pure & Appl. Chem. 61 (10): 1783–1822. doi:10.1351/pac198961101783. PDF "IUPAC-IUB Joint Commission on Biochemical Nomenclature (JCBN). The nomenclature of steroids. Recommendations 1989". Eur. J. Biochem. 186 (3): 429–58. December 1989. doi:10.1111/j.1432-1033.1989.tb15228.x. PMID 2606099.
^ "Lanosterol biosynthesis". Recommendations on Biochemical & Organic Nomenclature, Symbols & Terminology. International Union Of Biochemistry And Molecular Biology.
^ PubChem 130801; 219-08-9 cyclopentaphenanthrene
^ Edgren RA, Stanczyk FZ (December 1999). "Nomenclature of the gonane progestins". Contraception 60 (6): 313. doi:10.1016/S0010-7824(99)00101-8. PMID 10715364.
^ Grochowski L, Xu H, White R (2006). "Methanocaldococcus jannaschii uses a modified mevalonate pathway for biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate". J Bacteriol 188 (9): 3192–8. doi:10.1128/JB.188.9.3192-3198.2006. PMC 1447442. PMID 16621811.
^ a b Kuzuyama T, Seto H (2003). "Diversity of the biosynthesis of the isoprene units". Nat Prod Rep 20 (2): 171–83. doi:10.1039/b109860h. PMID 12735695.
^ Dubey V, Bhalla R, Luthra R (2003). "An overview of the non-mevalonate pathway for terpenoid biosynthesis in plants". J Biosci 28 (5): 637–46. doi:10.1007/BF02703339. PMID 14517367.
^ a b Schroepfer G (1981). "Sterol biosynthesis". Annu Rev Biochem 50: 585–621. doi:10.1146/annurev.bi.50.070181.003101. PMID 7023367.
^ Lees N, Skaggs B, Kirsch D, Bard M (1995). "Cloning of the late genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae—a review". Lipids 30 (3): 221–6. doi:10.1007/BF02537824. PMID 7791529.
^ Hanukoglu I (Dec 1992). "Steroidogenic enzymes: structure, function, and role in regulation of steroid hormone biosynthesis.". J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 43 (8): 779–804. doi:10.1016/0960-0760(92)90307-5. PMID 22217824.
^ Rossier MF (2006). "T channels and steroid biosynthesis: in search of a link with mitochondria". Cell Calcium. 40 (2): 155–64. doi:10.1016/j.ceca.2006.04.020. PMID 16759697.
^ Lichtenthaler H (1999). "The 1-Dideoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants". Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol 50: 47–65. doi:10.1146/annurev.arplant.50.1.47. PMID 15012203.
^ Pikuleva IA (2006). "Cytochrome P450s and cholesterol homeostasis". Pharmacol. Ther. 112 (3): 761–73. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2006.05.014. PMID 16872679.
^ Zollner G, Marschall HU, Wagner M, Trauner M (2006). "Role of nuclear receptors in the adaptive response to bile acids and cholestasis: pathogenetic and therapeutic considerations". Mol. Pharm. 3 (3): 231–51. doi:10.1021/mp060010s. PMID 16749856.
^ Kliewer S, Goodwin B, Willson T (2002). "The nuclear pregnane X receptor: a key regulator of xenobiotic metabolism". Endocr. Rev. 23 (5): 687–702. doi:10.1210/er.2001-0038. PMID 12372848.
[edit]External links

Nomenclature of Steroids Home Page at Queen Mary University of London.
The Science of Steroids (Documentary)
Steroidogenesis
[show] v t e
Cholesterol and steroid metabolic intermediates
[show] v t e
Metabolism (Catabolism, Anabolism)
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 9:00 pm 
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No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 3:23 pm 
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astig_119 wrote:
No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


Science now a days can make anyone stronger, just believe it..


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 4:01 pm 
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astig_119 wrote:
No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


Yes Pacquiao was winning but he still lost... If he had the plyometrics and isometric training I think the fight would've end just in 2 rounds... I believe in SCIENCE and I believe in what ARIZA did with Pacquiao before. ROACH + ARIZA + BUBOY = INDESTRUCTIBLE PACQUIAO.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 5:09 pm 
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kikes2200 wrote:
astig_119 wrote:
No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


Yes Pacquiao was winning but he still lost... If he had the plyometrics and isometric training I think the fight would've end just in 2 rounds... I believe in SCIENCE and I believe in what ARIZA did with Pacquiao before. ROACH + ARIZA + BUBOY = INDESTRUCTIBLE PACQUIAO.


The building of muscles and strength takes years not weeks, not months it becomes slower especially when the recipient is old. Ariza was hired before the Diaz fight correct me if im wrong but the the true test of their hard work is when he fights Cotto. Manny already packs muscles and strength and what he really needs is proper maintenance and conditioning exercises. I don't beleive Ariza just because this time his way was not heard he is telling something. I think about it I still have my brain intact.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 7:29 pm 
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kikes2200 wrote:
astig_119 wrote:
No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


Yes Pacquiao was winning but he still lost... If he had the plyometrics and isometric training I think the fight would've end just in 2 rounds... I believe in SCIENCE and I believe in what ARIZA did with Pacquiao before. ROACH + ARIZA + BUBOY = INDESTRUCTIBLE PACQUIAO.


You didn't get me bro, what I meant was if he has not resorted to that 'bara-bara' style, in that closing round, and used his brain, then no perfect counterpunch should have happened. PAC already knows much about the science of boxing, the real problem was, he forgot to use his coconut, and just gone rushing towards an intelligent counterpuncher. Believe me, if he has not done that foolish act, jmm is finished on the 7nth. :peace:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 3:36 am 
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astig_119 wrote:
kikes2200 wrote:
astig_119 wrote:
No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


Yes Pacquiao was winning but he still lost... If he had the plyometrics and isometric training I think the fight would've end just in 2 rounds... I believe in SCIENCE and I believe in what ARIZA did with Pacquiao before. ROACH + ARIZA + BUBOY = INDESTRUCTIBLE PACQUIAO.


Pacquiao should have used some technical way of fighting, it was Marquez who did and perfectly time him

You didn't get me bro, what I meant was if he has not resorted to that 'bara-bara' style, in that closing round, and used his brain, then no perfect counterpunch should have happened. PAC already knows much about the science of boxing, the real problem was, he forgot to use his coconut, and just gone rushing towards an intelligent counterpuncher. Believe me, if he has not done that foolish act, jmm is finished on the 7nth. :peace:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 3:44 am 
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We can blame roids all day but at the end of the day, Pac's low ring IQ and over zealousness did him in.
When JMM attacked him on the ropes, he circled to his right way TOOOOOO FAAAAR from Juan to avoid him .
Then he did his dumb double pump and double dart in with his head sticking up in the air.
Had he just stepped to his right just enough to avoid Juan, he could have darted in and nail Juan with his left.
Or just let the 3 minutes run out and let Juan swallow more of his blood between rounds.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 4:29 am 
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JoeyInCali wrote:
We can blame roids all day but at the end of the day, Pac's low ring IQ and over zealousness did him in.
When JMM attacked him on the ropes, he circled to his right way TOOOOOO FAAAAR from Juan to avoid him .
Then he did his dumb double pump and double dart in with his head sticking up in the air.
Had he just stepped to his right just enough to avoid Juan, he could have darted in and nail Juan with his left.
Or just let the 3 minutes run out and let Juan swallow more of his blood between rounds.


+1000


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 4:44 am 
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It's done! Nothing can do about it... let's just move on and hope that the great Pac can bounce back stronger than ever. I want him to see 3 more fights and win it convincingly, just before he retire.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 5:34 am 
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Lanski2000 wrote:
It's done! Nothing can do about it... let's just move on and hope that the great Pac can bounce back stronger than ever. I want him to see 3 more fights and win it convincingly, just before he retire.

Pac shouldn't just move on.
He should LEARN a ton from the loss.

No more 2 weeks of fiesta training in Gen San. Show up at the Wild Card 8 weeks before a fight. He has never lost in doing that. He has never lost doing Ariza's workouts.
He has never lost in getting a good night's sleep. He has lost two times in praying freaking nightly with a group of yahoos.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:15 am 
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JoeyInCali wrote:
We can blame roids all day but at the end of the day, Pac's low ring IQ and over zealousness did him in.
When JMM attacked him on the ropes, he circled to his right way TOOOOOO FAAAAR from Juan to avoid him .
Then he did his dumb double pump and double dart in with his head sticking up in the air.
Had he just stepped to his right just enough to avoid Juan, he could have darted in and nail Juan with his left.
Or just let the 3 minutes run out and let Juan swallow more of his blood between rounds.


This is right on the money and most feel the same way.. Manny could have knocked out Marquez had he just stepped to his right and threw his left straight.. He's had 3 fights with JMM and up to now, he's still yet to figure him out... Almost every time Manny threw a Jab, JMM would time him with his straight right. Manny should have followed his jab with his left straight while stepping to his right... At the end of the day, JMM was more focused mentally which made the difference in the end... JMM knew Manny more than Manny knew JMM...


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:25 am 
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Boxing2012 wrote:
JoeyInCali wrote:
We can blame roids all day but at the end of the day, Pac's low ring IQ and over zealousness did him in.
When JMM attacked him on the ropes, he circled to his right way TOOOOOO FAAAAR from Juan to avoid him .
Then he did his dumb double pump and double dart in with his head sticking up in the air.
Had he just stepped to his right just enough to avoid Juan, he could have darted in and nail Juan with his left.
Or just let the 3 minutes run out and let Juan swallow more of his blood between rounds.


This is right on the money and most feel the same way.. Manny could have knocked out Marquez had he just stepped to his right and threw his left straight.. He's had 3 fights with JMM and up to now, he's still yet to figure him out... Almost every time Manny threw a Jab, JMM would time him with his straight right. Manny should have followed his jab with his left straight while stepping to his right... At the end of the day, JMM was more focused mentally which made the difference in the end... JMM knew Manny more than Manny knew JMM...

Pac was too busy bible reading, singing and praying nightly instead of watching the videos of his three fights with Juan.
Every time Juan takes a half step back on his right foot, he is liable to come back with a huge right and push from that foot if you attack him from the middle.
I still have no clue why Pac does not have a double jab that's decent .


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:26 am 
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kikes2200 wrote:
astig_119 wrote:
No bro, I am disagreeing with you, though he was not really focused on training, he was indeed doing good and winning after his first kd, the problem was, he didn't use his coconut, the round was due to end but he still went into offensive so, that's what he got, a perfectly timed CounterPunch. Sorry guys, hard to accept, but that's the most valid reason why he lost the fight. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:


Yes Pacquiao was winning but he still lost... If he had the plyometrics and isometric training I think the fight would've end just in 2 rounds... I believe in SCIENCE and I believe in what ARIZA did with Pacquiao before. ROACH + ARIZA + BUBOY = INDESTRUCTIBLE PACQUIAO.

Meaning 3 is enough but Roach+Ariza+Buboy-Rosary+Pestor=Sweet dreams. :lol: :lol:


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