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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:14 pm 
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The.Equalizer wrote:
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
IceColdBeer wrote:
Ok na sana kaso nagbuhat na naman ng sariling bangko sa bandang huli. :?














:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Ipagmalaki ba namang uto utot siya. Di ba pagbubuhat ng sariling bangko yan? :?





:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 11:06 am 
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exactly brad :lol: :lol: :lol:







.............sino nga ba ang target utuin ni Maria Ressa sa paggamit sa gasgas na gasgas na catchphrase na "freedom of the press" kundi ang mga uto-utong Delawan followers lang naman wahahahahaha :bounce1:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 1:27 pm 
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Eto basahin nyo...


________

Freedom of the press is not the issue in the Maria Ressa story

FROM A DISTANCE - Carmen N. Pedrosa (The Philippine Star) - February 16, 2019 - 12:00am


We are being deluged with the “Maria Ressa and her press freedom story” in social media. It has a political purpose few would know and understand. As a columnist in another newspaper said, it is the template on how to oust governments in countries where the US must dominate (colonize).

As far as Maria Ressa and her foreign supporters are concerned, President Duterte, no matter how many Filipinos voted for him or how well he is doing his job as president of the Philippines, Western especially American strategists want him ousted.

For the first time we have a president who wants to do good for his country. He may have flaws but on the all-important duty of how to build a strong nation independently he is being condemned under the guise of “freedom of the press principle” by some Western and US strategists.

He may want to fulfill his mandate as the president of the Philippines to build an independent and strong nation but he is stopped because there is a bigger geopolitical issue involved – the China and US superpower rivalry in our region.

The Philippines stands between the two rivals for its strategic location and a lime development of pliant “little brown brothers.”

With that in mind the “freedom of the press” Maria Ressa claims is the “press freedom to lie.”

I agree with a columnist from another newspaper who calls it a template and points to Rappler’s funder Pierre Omidyar through his Omidyar Network as an example of what it does to oust a leader and destabilize a country.

Omidyar Network invested in Rappler in November 2015.

This is Rappler’s job in the Philippines with Maria Ressa selected to carry out the job. There are other anti-Duterte journalists in the Philippines but the Maria Ressa’s is a special kind. It has set a political goal in mind on behalf of a foreign interest.

President Rodrigo Duterte is not without fault. Indeed he has many faults but his kind of leadership is needed for a country in the stranglehold of a former colonialist “which claimed to set it free without setting it free.” It was brilliant deception and many American “Filipinos” mostly of the oligarchy have taken their side except that the policy is not brutally stated as such but wrapped in boxes with ribbons of human rights and press freedom. Maria Ressa formerly of the CNN is such a gift being given to us.

But majority of Filipinos are growing up politically knowing what independence and freedom really mean. They will not be deceived.

The “freedom of the press” being alleged by Maria Ressa and her supporters is a cover up for the real issue here – the freedom of the Philippines from America’s colonization.

PRRD has made it clear that it was his duty to have an independent foreign policy for his country. With it goes the difficulties after a long history of Filipino oligarchs supporting continued American colonialization. That is the root cause of the sudden upsurge of issues to swing Filipinos from their support to Duterte and return us to the Aquino kind of Liberals with the May elections.

The columnist continues:

“Rappler has not disclosed how much Omidyar, a French-American billionaire who founded eBay, had invested in Rappler. However, a study of Rappler’s financial statements, would indicate that Omidyar put in about P100 million in the website. Venture Capital firm North Base media a few months earlier plunked in P50 million.”

Omidyar has apparently issued the order for Rappler and another of his media outfits, the US-based online publication The Intercept to work together to create outrage against Duterte. The Intercept has been posting extremely one-sided articles on Duterte that portray the President as a deranged killer.

A June 17 article claimed; “Since Duterte took office last June, police and vigilante death squads have killed more than 7,000 people, and devastated poor communities in cities across the country.

That 7,000 figure is what Rappler had invented way back in September 2016, which I have totally debunked so that respectable news outlets no longer use that false figure.

The invention of that 7,000 number, which it claimed was only as of September 2016, has been one of Rappler’s biggest achievements in demonizing Duterte.

What I found so shameful, and even treasonous for Rappler, was its conspiracy last May with The Intercept to disclose to the world the confidential telephone conversation between President Trump and Duterte.

Rappler gave the transcript of the conversation it got from Yellow stragglers at the foreign affairs department to The Intercept to first publish.

It then reported it, claiming it was merely re-publishing the report of that US Omidyar outfit. The thirst for fame of Rappler’s editors got the better of them, as it apparently asked intercept.com to put a note that the article was written “in partnership with Rappler.”

In a tone that reflects its capitalist worldview, Forbes’ lead paragraphs for the article on Omidyar’s funding of the Ukraine media outfit read: “The best way to raise funds for a media project in Ukraine? Go full-bore anti-Russia to easily woo North American and European governments to give you money.”

That notion could be the kindest comment on Rappler as well as on PCIJ, the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility, and Vera Files.

These latter three are the three local media outfits funded by the National Endowment for Democracy, which has been accused by respected investigative journalists to have been and continues to be a venue for propaganda operations of the Central Intelligence Agency.

What’s happened to our country? How could journalists who had in the past been passionate nationalists so devoted to the truth serve US masters? Is this what they call “globalization”?

Our duty as citizens of the Philippines is to make sure that if there should be an election we should vote Duterte’s candidates.

_________________
“YESTERDAY IS HISTORY, TOMORROW A MYSTERY, AND TODAY
A GIFT…THAT’S WHY IT IS CALLED THE PRESENT “.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 1:28 pm 
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Eto pa...

_____

Cyber libel
SKETCHES - Ana Marie Pamintuan (The Philippine Star) - February 18, 2019 - 12:00am


As that statement from the National Press Club and several published commentaries indicate, members of the Philippine media are conflicted over the arrest of Rappler CEO Maria Ressa for cyber libel.

Both Malacañang and the private complainant, businessman William Keng, are standing firm on their statements that President Duterte and his government have nothing to do with the arrest and Maria’s inability to post bail immediately for a bailable offense. They point out that a private individual felt wronged by a media report and took the available legal recourse for redress.

Maria and several media groups, noting the timing of the court indictment and her arrest on top of the other battles Rappler is facing, believe otherwise and see press freedom under threat. Persons or organizations that incur the ire of Duterte do tend to end up in serious trouble: a chief justice was ousted pronto while two senators have been arrested and one is still in detention.

On Rappler’s troubles, the opposing sides are unlikely to change their positions.

* * *

For a broader appreciation of what’s happening, we discussed the issue on “The Chiefs” with former Supreme Court spokesman Theodore Te and cyber crime lawyer Regie Tongol, last Friday on Cignal TV’s One News channel.

Some takeaways from our discussion:

There is no prohibition on serving an arrest warrant after normal government office hours, or at past 5 or 6 p.m. Anyone with a standing arrest warrant can be taken in by the police at any time of the day or night. In fact, Te told us, the arresting officer need not even present the warrant immediately.

He explained that if a cop, for example, spots in Zamboanga someone that he knows has a pending arrest warrant issued in Manila, the cop isn’t going to get the warrant first before arresting the suspect. The warrant can be shown later after the suspect has been taken in.

There are so many arrest warrants pending all over the country, Te pointed out, and it would be impossible for a cop to have a copy of each one in his possession in case he chances upon a suspect. This can be cured by placing such court data in digital format that can be accessed on any smartphone, but our judiciary isn’t there yet despite an ongoing computerization project.

Isn’t there supposed to be a rule that no one should be arrested for a bailable offense after office hours when bail can’t be processed, or on a Friday because the suspect would end up spending the weekend in jail?

There is nothing in the rules of court that says so, Te said. If there is such a rule, he noted, it could be an internal one in the Philippine National Police.

* * *

Being arrested after office hours shouldn’t be too worrisome since there are night courts in several cities all over the country. Even if Maria’s arrest warrant was issued by a regional trial court, Te said the rules allowed the night court, even if it was a metropolitan trial court in Pasay, to process bail for a libel complaint.

Unfortunately for Maria and for all of us citizens, it seems our night courts are useless in the first weeks of the year.

Te explained that night courts were originally set up for foreign tourists, so their cases could be decided quickly with minimal disruption in their travel schedules. Regie Tongol told The Chiefs that even if the night court was open in Pasay last week, this year’s accreditation for those who process bail bonds has not yet been released by the Supreme Court’s Office of the Court Administrator. The list is normally released by mid-February or later in the month, Tongol said.

With no one to process a bail bond, the person arrested can opt for a cash bail. But because cash is involved, Tongol and Te said the cashier’s money processing systems in the lower courts are networked with the Supreme Court. In Maria’s case, it was after office hours, and the one in charge at the SC had probably gone home, Tongol said.

Another problem with night courts, Te notes, is that these are housed in office buildings or complexes operated by local government units. The LGUs pay for the air conditioning, electricity and overtime pay of personnel who must be around while the night court is in operation. And some LGUs are unwilling or unable to foot those additional bills.

We can only speculate on whether the National Bureau of Investigation, which served the arrest warrant on Maria, was aware of such circumstances. Officials of the NBI and its mother agency the Department of Justice have invoked the presumption of regularity in serving the arrest warrant after 5 p.m. on the eve of Valentine’s Day.

* * *

Another takeaway from our discussion on The Chiefs is related to the fact that the arrest warrant was issued for a Rappler report published before the law on cyber libel was enacted, but updated in 2014 when it was already in effect.

In the case of printed news, it’s easier to pursue libel for multiple publications and reprints of the article in question, and to set the prescription period for filing a libel complaint. If a politician, for example, picks up a 20-year-old negative report on a rival and reprints and distributes the article, this is deemed a new publication with a new prescription period.

Given the nature of the internet, however, stories can be in cyberspace long after we’re all dead. Even items deleted from online publications can linger forever in cyberspace. When do you start computing for the start of the prescription period for cyber libel? Should every update of an article count, even if it is edited only for a typo error or to add a comma or period?

Both Te and Tongol concede that this is a gray area that will eventually have to be settled by the SC, after the lower courts have ruled on the libel case against Maria.

If any jurisprudence that might result from the SC deliberation on the issue is deemed to impinge on freedom of expression and the press, Congress can pass remedial legislation, Te said.

This is a different media environment and cyber libel is a new creature. Those who will rule on the issue must see to it that the legal precedents they set will not be a cause for future national regret.

_________________
“YESTERDAY IS HISTORY, TOMORROW A MYSTERY, AND TODAY
A GIFT…THAT’S WHY IT IS CALLED THE PRESENT “.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 1:29 pm 
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What we lost fighting over
CTALK - Cito Beltran (The Philippine Star) - February 18, 2019 - 12:00am


Once again many members of media and those claiming to be supportive of media and Freedom of the Press are making their views heard and read in defense of Journalist Maria Ressa or in defense of President Rodrigo Duterte. This column however is not about them but about a bunch of free loaders hoping to get media mileage from the current Libel related feud. What sickens me are those political re-electionists who are riding on the bandwagon chiming out their support for Press Freedom and calling out to “authorities” to be humane! What a bunch of hypocrites!

Hello?! In between 1992 and 2019 what real recognizable efforts have any of you members of Congress and the Senate done that qualifies as a determined, persistent and organized effort for the eradication or decriminalization of Libel? If you Fakes really support Freedom of the Press how come all we ever hear from you sorry losers is lip service? Your press release or sound byte that has a shelf life of 24 hours are all self-serving and shows how stupid you think the media are: assuming that we will all be so happy to believe that you are on our side! What a cheap shot at publicity just to be re-elected or to be in the news for free!

If you are earnestly concerned for Freedom of the Press more than your Public Relations with members of the media, then you who spout your concern ought to have done so at the very first instance and at every turn and event where we as professionals were stifled, blocked, charged or attacked! Scores of journalists, broadcasters and professional crews have been killed, attacked or fired from their jobs because we investigated corruption. If legislators and those re-electionists believed in Freedom of the Press then how come there is no law that requires networks and the likes to allocate air time for independent producers outside of “cable TV”? If there is a sincere interest in keeping Freedom of the Press healthy, then how come our “Media perfect” Senators and Congressmen never bothered to investigate the well-being, compensation and benefits of media workers?

I became a car-napping victim while doing a series on Mansions of Military generals, later I was removed from a radio program for supporting the BIR in its tax war against a rich and powerful individual. Advertising was more important than ratings or righteousness. My father ended up being charged with Libel by a sitting President for using a figure of speech. Until he died, Louie Beltran believed that Cory was misled and misinformed by two cabinet members whose activities my father regularly criticized and exposed. My father at least got lip service and lies from politicians. I quietly trudged on while cutting notches on my belt of reality and experience.

Quite frankly, so many people easily raise the banner of Press Freedom as if Freedom of the Press was just about Libel or censorship. It is ironic that we all think there is Freedom of the Press in the Philippines given the reality that Congress holds the power to issue or revoke a “Franchise to Operate” a media outfit. Yes, the “Congress” as defined by George Washington or Benjamin Franklin during their time was and is suppose to be representative of the peoples’ will, but in the Philippines they are no more than merchants who have “weaponized” public office against their political and commercial enemies! The Press, ideally, is suppose to have neither Fear nor Favor, but ask any owner of any media outfit honest enough to speak and they could tell you that there is fear and most certainly lots of Favors “owned” as in “Utang na loob” which they are perpetually reminded of especially before campaign time and elections.

In fact this barely talked about business model of government and Congress, is the very reason why independent media outlets have all disappeared and reappeared as absorbed, purchased companies of mega corporations. Once Congress or government targets a media company, it simply hemorrhages, shrinks, loses advertisers or loses a franchise and dies. There are sensational stories such as the Inquirer and Rappler but there are also “Silent movies” where we never hear a sound and never see the media outfit ever again.

The current struggle of Maria Ressa and Rappler versus their accuser Mr. Keng and the imagined backer, the Duterte administration is simply just another bone everyone is fighting over because of political manipulation between the DU30s and the Yellows. They will all have their day in court while the rest of Philippine media allow themselves to get sucked into the misleading notion that competition is good for business. No it is not because Media is not supposed to be a business and we are not supposed to be competitors. We fight the same battles and should not be fighting or bashing each other. That is the work of the devil not a media professional. For so long, we have been led out of pride and greed to try to beat the competition with a scoop, inside story, better resources and bragging rights. That’s what happened to our elders in the trade right before Martial Law. One day they all woke up in the same detention camp, sharing bunks, praying for each other, encouraging each other, commiserating with each other. By then it was too late and it would take over a decade to regain what was lost. But we never got it back because once again, they made a business out of Freedom of the Press.

_________________
“YESTERDAY IS HISTORY, TOMORROW A MYSTERY, AND TODAY
A GIFT…THAT’S WHY IT IS CALLED THE PRESENT “.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 1:54 pm 
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Thank you Bobby...


________

Maria Ressa is an American, bashing the Philippines salvaged her distressed career


By RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO
February 18, 2019




Part 1

RAPPLER CEO and editor in chief Maria Angelita Aycardo Ressa is an American citizen, who of course uses US passports that identify her nationality. She has been deliberately, yet cleverly, hiding this fact.

So have US media which rushed in, believing her lies against the Duterte administration, either because of their journalistic laziness or perhaps after all, proud that an American is lecturing this Third World country somewhere in the Pacific on press freedom and is being persecuted for it.

No wonder that American press institutions that want to impose their beliefs on Third World nations have showered Ressa with awards that a “brave Filipina” is fighting for press freedom in this country with a spineless local press.

It is so disgusting that Vice President Leni Robredo, Yellow senators like Risa Hontiveros, Church officials, and even academic institutions like the Ateneo and La Salle gave the benefit of the doubt to an American rather than to Filipinos patriotically serving the country like Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra, who ordered Ressa to be charged with cyber-libel, and Judge Reinalda Estacio-Montesa, who issued the arrest warrant against her.




Guevarra is such a respected legal eagle that Duterte appointed him to his post, even if he was formerly former President Aquino 3rd’s deputy executive secretary. Estascio-Montesa on the other hand is the country’s foremost expert in the novel field of cyber-crime, and was our sole representative in the European Union’s Global Action on Cybercrime. Her independence and integrity are obvious in that she was first appointed as trial court judge by Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo in 2006 and then by Benigno Aquino 3rd as regional trial court judge in 2012.

Are these the type of people whom President Duterte can tell what to do, to “weaponize” – Ressa’s term – our laws?

US embassy

Right after Ressa was arrested, the US embassy issued a statement — a rare one, her media outfit Rappler itself reported — which said: “We hope the charge against journalist and Rappler CEO Maria Ressa will be resolved quickly in accordance with relevant Philippine law and international standards of due process.”

The statement was not due to US concerns over a purported attack on the press, as Rappler implied. It was simply because Ressa is a US citizen, and US embassies are required to publicly express concern over a high-profile citizen being arrested and charged in local courts.

If Ressa had to spend more than a day in detention, we would have seen a US embassy officer visit her to check on her situation, as is standard operating procedure for American embassies.

Going by the success of Ressa in spreading lies around the world, the framers of our Constitution were men of foresight when they put in our nation’s basic law: “The ownership and management of mass media shall be limited to citizens of the Philippines, or to corporations, cooperatives or associations, wholly owned and managed by such citizens.”

Oath of US allegiance

Ressa became a US citizen shortly after her family migrated to the US in 1973, and swore the oath of allegiance required of naturalized Americans, the very first sentence of which declares:

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen.”

No wonder Ressa has no qualms about lying to the world that the Philippine president is a dictator and is attacking the press. She just isn’t a Filipino, in the deeper meaning of the term.

While she acquired Philippine citizenship in 2004 under the country’s “dual citizenship law,” this has been only for convenience, for her to own property in the country. There is no oath similar to the US oath of allegiance (to “abjure” allegiance to one’s former country) in such re-acquisition of Filipino citizenship by a former Filipino.

Dual citizenship proved to be a huge advantage for Ressa as she claimed to be a Filipino in becoming a major stockholder of Rappler (and later Rappler Holdings), a firm in media, an industry where foreigners are totally banned from both investing in or managing.

So unlike Poe

Talk of “transparency” Ressa incessantly says this country needs: She has never disclosed to the Securities and Exchange Commission nor anywhere else that she swore to “absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to” the Philippines. This is so unlike Sen. Grace Poe, who renounced her US citizenship to run for office in the country of her birth.

Ressa considers herself an American, and has been ashamed to claim to be identified as a Filipino when traveling abroad. Except once when she tried out her new Philippine passport issued under the dual citizenship law in 2004, Ressa has always used her US passports, four so far since the first was issued in the 1970s (US passports have 10-year validities).

She used her US passports in all of her 350 arrivals and departures in the Philippines in the past 14 years. With such frequency of travel, leaving the country almost every month, either Ressa has a secret job as international correspondent, spy – or so homesick of America she visits it so often. (I wonder if she charged her trips to Rappler.)

No wonder Ressa is so bold in spreading lies against Duterte. Behind her to defend her is the most powerful nation on earth. If ever Ressa is convicted of the crimes she is charged of and ordered jailed, she could just flee to the US.

Despite the Philippines’ extradition treaty with the US, the imperial power has had a track record of refusing to extradite its citizens hunted by police authorities or convicted by courts for some crime. This happened for instance even in the face of public outrage, as in the case of American Rod Strunk, the prime suspect in the murder of his wife Nida Blanca in 2001, whom the US has refused to extradite to the Philippines despite the charges against him.

Hid nationality

US media foundations which showered Ressa with so much praise as a courageous fighter for press freedom struggled to hide her nationality.

For example, the Committee to Protect Journalists announced that its 2018 “International Press Freedom Awards go to a Vietnamese blogger, Venezuelan reporter, Ukrainian broadcaster, a Sudanese freelancer, a Cameroonian radio correspondent, and a Tibetan documentary filmmaker.”

How did it refer to Ressa who was given Columbia University’s Gwen Ifill Press Freedom Award?

Just as “Rappler editor,” without identifying her nationality. The Columbia University functionary, Sheila Coronel, who lobbied for Ressa’s award, and who prides herself on being a top-notch investigative journalist, portrayed Ressa as a Filipina, that she “was born in the Philippines, migrated with her family to the US, and then returned to Manila in the 1980s.” She omitted to mention what would have been a significant information: That she assumed American citizenship in the 1970s and never gave it up.

Ressa though is not a rare creature in this sorry country. Not a few Filipinos who abandoned their country by becoming US citizens or to work abroad (even to purportedly teach investigative journalism in an Ivy League school) delight in bashing the country, without even doing research to verify information spewed in such publications as Rappler.

What’s happened to our country? Why do we allow an American to run a company in an industry totally reserved for Filipinos? Why do we allow this American to tell lies to the world that press freedom is under attack in this country, and that only she and her Rappler are bold enough to oppose a dictator? Why are so many among our political and intellectual elite so gullible to believe an American’s lies against this country and its government?

On Wednesday, Part 2: How Ressa salvaged her distressed career by being a tool of the Yellows and then bashing the country and Duterte

Email: tiglao.manilatimes@gmail.com
Facebook: Rigoberto Tiglao
Twitter: @bobitiglao
Archives at: www.rigobertotiglao.com

_________________
“YESTERDAY IS HISTORY, TOMORROW A MYSTERY, AND TODAY
A GIFT…THAT’S WHY IT IS CALLED THE PRESENT “.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:16 pm 
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good read 8)
JABEZJ wrote:
What we lost fighting over
CTALK - Cito Beltran (The Philippine Star) - February 18, 2019 - 12:00am


Once again many members of media and those claiming to be supportive of media and Freedom of the Press are making their views heard and read in defense of Journalist Maria Ressa or in defense of President Rodrigo Duterte. This column however is not about them but about a bunch of free loaders hoping to get media mileage from the current Libel related feud. What sickens me are those political re-electionists who are riding on the bandwagon chiming out their support for Press Freedom and calling out to “authorities” to be humane! What a bunch of hypocrites!

Hello?! In between 1992 and 2019 what real recognizable efforts have any of you members of Congress and the Senate done that qualifies as a determined, persistent and organized effort for the eradication or decriminalization of Libel? If you Fakes really support Freedom of the Press how come all we ever hear from you sorry losers is lip service? Your press release or sound byte that has a shelf life of 24 hours are all self-serving and shows how stupid you think the media are: assuming that we will all be so happy to believe that you are on our side! What a cheap shot at publicity just to be re-elected or to be in the news for free!

If you are earnestly concerned for Freedom of the Press more than your Public Relations with members of the media, then you who spout your concern ought to have done so at the very first instance and at every turn and event where we as professionals were stifled, blocked, charged or attacked! Scores of journalists, broadcasters and professional crews have been killed, attacked or fired from their jobs because we investigated corruption. If legislators and those re-electionists believed in Freedom of the Press then how come there is no law that requires networks and the likes to allocate air time for independent producers outside of “cable TV”? If there is a sincere interest in keeping Freedom of the Press healthy, then how come our “Media perfect” Senators and Congressmen never bothered to investigate the well-being, compensation and benefits of media workers?

I became a car-napping victim while doing a series on Mansions of Military generals, later I was removed from a radio program for supporting the BIR in its tax war against a rich and powerful individual. Advertising was more important than ratings or righteousness. My father ended up being charged with Libel by a sitting President for using a figure of speech. Until he died, Louie Beltran believed that Cory was misled and misinformed by two cabinet members whose activities my father regularly criticized and exposed. My father at least got lip service and lies from politicians. I quietly trudged on while cutting notches on my belt of reality and experience.

Quite frankly, so many people easily raise the banner of Press Freedom as if Freedom of the Press was just about Libel or censorship. It is ironic that we all think there is Freedom of the Press in the Philippines given the reality that Congress holds the power to issue or revoke a “Franchise to Operate” a media outfit. Yes, the “Congress” as defined by George Washington or Benjamin Franklin during their time was and is suppose to be representative of the peoples’ will, but in the Philippines they are no more than merchants who have “weaponized” public office against their political and commercial enemies! The Press, ideally, is suppose to have neither Fear nor Favor, but ask any owner of any media outfit honest enough to speak and they could tell you that there is fear and most certainly lots of Favors “owned” as in “Utang na loob” which they are perpetually reminded of especially before campaign time and elections.

In fact this barely talked about business model of government and Congress, is the very reason why independent media outlets have all disappeared and reappeared as absorbed, purchased companies of mega corporations. Once Congress or government targets a media company, it simply hemorrhages, shrinks, loses advertisers or loses a franchise and dies. There are sensational stories such as the Inquirer and Rappler but there are also “Silent movies” where we never hear a sound and never see the media outfit ever again.

The current struggle of Maria Ressa and Rappler versus their accuser Mr. Keng and the imagined backer, the Duterte administration is simply just another bone everyone is fighting over because of political manipulation between the DU30s and the Yellows. They will all have their day in court while the rest of Philippine media allow themselves to get sucked into the misleading notion that competition is good for business. No it is not because Media is not supposed to be a business and we are not supposed to be competitors. We fight the same battles and should not be fighting or bashing each other. That is the work of the devil not a media professional. For so long, we have been led out of pride and greed to try to beat the competition with a scoop, inside story, better resources and bragging rights. That’s what happened to our elders in the trade right before Martial Law. One day they all woke up in the same detention camp, sharing bunks, praying for each other, encouraging each other, commiserating with each other. By then it was too late and it would take over a decade to regain what was lost. But we never got it back because once again, they made a business out of Freedom of the Press.

_________________
Fat Man in Nagasaki


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:27 pm 
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"hihihihihihih walang credibility yan si Tiggy....."


---- Delawang uto-uto, puro bukol na sa kakaumpog pero uto-uto pa din :lol: :lol: :lol:


JABEZJ wrote:
Thank you Bobby...


________

Maria Ressa is an American, bashing the Philippines salvaged her distressed career


By RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO
February 18, 2019




Part 1

RAPPLER CEO and editor in chief Maria Angelita Aycardo Ressa is an American citizen, who of course uses US passports that identify her nationality. She has been deliberately, yet cleverly, hiding this fact.

So have US media which rushed in, believing her lies against the Duterte administration, either because of their journalistic laziness or perhaps after all, proud that an American is lecturing this Third World country somewhere in the Pacific on press freedom and is being persecuted for it.

No wonder that American press institutions that want to impose their beliefs on Third World nations have showered Ressa with awards that a “brave Filipina” is fighting for press freedom in this country with a spineless local press.

It is so disgusting that Vice President Leni Robredo, Yellow senators like Risa Hontiveros, Church officials, and even academic institutions like the Ateneo and La Salle gave the benefit of the doubt to an American rather than to Filipinos patriotically serving the country like Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra, who ordered Ressa to be charged with cyber-libel, and Judge Reinalda Estacio-Montesa, who issued the arrest warrant against her.




Guevarra is such a respected legal eagle that Duterte appointed him to his post, even if he was formerly former President Aquino 3rd’s deputy executive secretary. Estascio-Montesa on the other hand is the country’s foremost expert in the novel field of cyber-crime, and was our sole representative in the European Union’s Global Action on Cybercrime. Her independence and integrity are obvious in that she was first appointed as trial court judge by Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo in 2006 and then by Benigno Aquino 3rd as regional trial court judge in 2012.

Are these the type of people whom President Duterte can tell what to do, to “weaponize” – Ressa’s term – our laws?

US embassy

Right after Ressa was arrested, the US embassy issued a statement — a rare one, her media outfit Rappler itself reported — which said: “We hope the charge against journalist and Rappler CEO Maria Ressa will be resolved quickly in accordance with relevant Philippine law and international standards of due process.”

The statement was not due to US concerns over a purported attack on the press, as Rappler implied. It was simply because Ressa is a US citizen, and US embassies are required to publicly express concern over a high-profile citizen being arrested and charged in local courts.

If Ressa had to spend more than a day in detention, we would have seen a US embassy officer visit her to check on her situation, as is standard operating procedure for American embassies.

Going by the success of Ressa in spreading lies around the world, the framers of our Constitution were men of foresight when they put in our nation’s basic law: “The ownership and management of mass media shall be limited to citizens of the Philippines, or to corporations, cooperatives or associations, wholly owned and managed by such citizens.”

Oath of US allegiance

Ressa became a US citizen shortly after her family migrated to the US in 1973, and swore the oath of allegiance required of naturalized Americans, the very first sentence of which declares:

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen.”

No wonder Ressa has no qualms about lying to the world that the Philippine president is a dictator and is attacking the press. She just isn’t a Filipino, in the deeper meaning of the term.

While she acquired Philippine citizenship in 2004 under the country’s “dual citizenship law,” this has been only for convenience, for her to own property in the country. There is no oath similar to the US oath of allegiance (to “abjure” allegiance to one’s former country) in such re-acquisition of Filipino citizenship by a former Filipino.

Dual citizenship proved to be a huge advantage for Ressa as she claimed to be a Filipino in becoming a major stockholder of Rappler (and later Rappler Holdings), a firm in media, an industry where foreigners are totally banned from both investing in or managing.

So unlike Poe

Talk of “transparency” Ressa incessantly says this country needs: She has never disclosed to the Securities and Exchange Commission nor anywhere else that she swore to “absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to” the Philippines. This is so unlike Sen. Grace Poe, who renounced her US citizenship to run for office in the country of her birth.

Ressa considers herself an American, and has been ashamed to claim to be identified as a Filipino when traveling abroad. Except once when she tried out her new Philippine passport issued under the dual citizenship law in 2004, Ressa has always used her US passports, four so far since the first was issued in the 1970s (US passports have 10-year validities).

She used her US passports in all of her 350 arrivals and departures in the Philippines in the past 14 years. With such frequency of travel, leaving the country almost every month, either Ressa has a secret job as international correspondent, spy – or so homesick of America she visits it so often. (I wonder if she charged her trips to Rappler.)

No wonder Ressa is so bold in spreading lies against Duterte. Behind her to defend her is the most powerful nation on earth. If ever Ressa is convicted of the crimes she is charged of and ordered jailed, she could just flee to the US.

Despite the Philippines’ extradition treaty with the US, the imperial power has had a track record of refusing to extradite its citizens hunted by police authorities or convicted by courts for some crime. This happened for instance even in the face of public outrage, as in the case of American Rod Strunk, the prime suspect in the murder of his wife Nida Blanca in 2001, whom the US has refused to extradite to the Philippines despite the charges against him.

Hid nationality

US media foundations which showered Ressa with so much praise as a courageous fighter for press freedom struggled to hide her nationality.

For example, the Committee to Protect Journalists announced that its 2018 “International Press Freedom Awards go to a Vietnamese blogger, Venezuelan reporter, Ukrainian broadcaster, a Sudanese freelancer, a Cameroonian radio correspondent, and a Tibetan documentary filmmaker.”

How did it refer to Ressa who was given Columbia University’s Gwen Ifill Press Freedom Award?

Just as “Rappler editor,” without identifying her nationality. The Columbia University functionary, Sheila Coronel, who lobbied for Ressa’s award, and who prides herself on being a top-notch investigative journalist, portrayed Ressa as a Filipina, that she “was born in the Philippines, migrated with her family to the US, and then returned to Manila in the 1980s.” She omitted to mention what would have been a significant information: That she assumed American citizenship in the 1970s and never gave it up.

Ressa though is not a rare creature in this sorry country. Not a few Filipinos who abandoned their country by becoming US citizens or to work abroad (even to purportedly teach investigative journalism in an Ivy League school) delight in bashing the country, without even doing research to verify information spewed in such publications as Rappler.

What’s happened to our country? Why do we allow an American to run a company in an industry totally reserved for Filipinos? Why do we allow this American to tell lies to the world that press freedom is under attack in this country, and that only she and her Rappler are bold enough to oppose a dictator? Why are so many among our political and intellectual elite so gullible to believe an American’s lies against this country and its government?

On Wednesday, Part 2: How Ressa salvaged her distressed career by being a tool of the Yellows and then bashing the country and Duterte

Email: tiglao.manilatimes@gmail.com
Facebook: Rigoberto Tiglao
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:35 pm 
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nangongopya lang yan Carmen na yan dito sa Pacland wahahahaha :lol: :lol: :lol:

JABEZJ wrote:
Eto basahin nyo...


________

Freedom of the press is not the issue in the Maria Ressa story

FROM A DISTANCE - Carmen N. Pedrosa (The Philippine Star) - February 16, 2019 - 12:00am


We are being deluged with the “Maria Ressa and her press freedom story” in social media. It has a political purpose few would know and understand. As a columnist in another newspaper said, it is the template on how to oust governments in countries where the US must dominate (colonize).

As far as Maria Ressa and her foreign supporters are concerned, President Duterte, no matter how many Filipinos voted for him or how well he is doing his job as president of the Philippines, Western especially American strategists want him ousted.

For the first time we have a president who wants to do good for his country. He may have flaws but on the all-important duty of how to build a strong nation independently he is being condemned under the guise of “freedom of the press principle” by some Western and US strategists.

He may want to fulfill his mandate as the president of the Philippines to build an independent and strong nation but he is stopped because there is a bigger geopolitical issue involved – the China and US superpower rivalry in our region.

The Philippines stands between the two rivals for its strategic location and a lime development of pliant “little brown brothers.”

With that in mind the “freedom of the press” Maria Ressa claims is the “press freedom to lie.”

I agree with a columnist from another newspaper who calls it a template and points to Rappler’s funder Pierre Omidyar through his Omidyar Network as an example of what it does to oust a leader and destabilize a country.

Omidyar Network invested in Rappler in November 2015.

This is Rappler’s job in the Philippines with Maria Ressa selected to carry out the job. There are other anti-Duterte journalists in the Philippines but the Maria Ressa’s is a special kind. It has set a political goal in mind on behalf of a foreign interest.

President Rodrigo Duterte is not without fault. Indeed he has many faults but his kind of leadership is needed for a country in the stranglehold of a former colonialist “which claimed to set it free without setting it free.” It was brilliant deception and many American “Filipinos” mostly of the oligarchy have taken their side except that the policy is not brutally stated as such but wrapped in boxes with ribbons of human rights and press freedom. Maria Ressa formerly of the CNN is such a gift being given to us.

But majority of Filipinos are growing up politically knowing what independence and freedom really mean. They will not be deceived.

The “freedom of the press” being alleged by Maria Ressa and her supporters is a cover up for the real issue here – the freedom of the Philippines from America’s colonization.

PRRD has made it clear that it was his duty to have an independent foreign policy for his country. With it goes the difficulties after a long history of Filipino oligarchs supporting continued American colonialization. That is the root cause of the sudden upsurge of issues to swing Filipinos from their support to Duterte and return us to the Aquino kind of Liberals with the May elections.

The columnist continues:

“Rappler has not disclosed how much Omidyar, a French-American billionaire who founded eBay, had invested in Rappler. However, a study of Rappler’s financial statements, would indicate that Omidyar put in about P100 million in the website. Venture Capital firm North Base media a few months earlier plunked in P50 million.”

Omidyar has apparently issued the order for Rappler and another of his media outfits, the US-based online publication The Intercept to work together to create outrage against Duterte. The Intercept has been posting extremely one-sided articles on Duterte that portray the President as a deranged killer.

A June 17 article claimed; “Since Duterte took office last June, police and vigilante death squads have killed more than 7,000 people, and devastated poor communities in cities across the country.

That 7,000 figure is what Rappler had invented way back in September 2016, which I have totally debunked so that respectable news outlets no longer use that false figure.

The invention of that 7,000 number, which it claimed was only as of September 2016, has been one of Rappler’s biggest achievements in demonizing Duterte.

What I found so shameful, and even treasonous for Rappler, was its conspiracy last May with The Intercept to disclose to the world the confidential telephone conversation between President Trump and Duterte.

Rappler gave the transcript of the conversation it got from Yellow stragglers at the foreign affairs department to The Intercept to first publish.

It then reported it, claiming it was merely re-publishing the report of that US Omidyar outfit. The thirst for fame of Rappler’s editors got the better of them, as it apparently asked intercept.com to put a note that the article was written “in partnership with Rappler.”

In a tone that reflects its capitalist worldview, Forbes’ lead paragraphs for the article on Omidyar’s funding of the Ukraine media outfit read: “The best way to raise funds for a media project in Ukraine? Go full-bore anti-Russia to easily woo North American and European governments to give you money.”

That notion could be the kindest comment on Rappler as well as on PCIJ, the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility, and Vera Files.

These latter three are the three local media outfits funded by the National Endowment for Democracy, which has been accused by respected investigative journalists to have been and continues to be a venue for propaganda operations of the Central Intelligence Agency.

What’s happened to our country? How could journalists who had in the past been passionate nationalists so devoted to the truth serve US masters? Is this what they call “globalization”?

Our duty as citizens of the Philippines is to make sure that if there should be an election we should vote Duterte’s candidates.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 3:58 pm 
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Kawawa talaga. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 5:08 pm 
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Americana pala si Ressa... :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 7:30 am 
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May Brasilyang kawawa at patuloy pa din up ng up nung langaw threads niya. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 8:02 am 
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desperado na talaga sa atensyon baka magkombulsyon na yan kailangan na niya talaga mapansin hihihihihihih :lol: :lol: :lol:









kawawa :bounce1:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 8:41 am 
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The.Equalizer wrote:
desperado na talaga sa atensyon baka magkombulsyon na yan kailangan na niya talaga mapansin hihihihihihih :lol: :lol: :lol:









kawawa :bounce1:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 10:58 am 
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Talking about Wilfredo Keng , Maria Ressa's , accuser, a wholly owned subsidiary of his company, Century Peaks Mining Corporation, bagged a massive infrastructure project with a reclamation component in the province of Cavite. . https://www.philstar.com/business/2018/ ... nhSrpWDzJ5

"A wholly owned subsidiary of mining firm Century Peak Metals Holdings Corp. is set to take a shot at a massive infrastructure project with reclamation component in the province of Cavite.

Century Peak Metals chief information officer Katrina Keng informed the Philippine Stock Exchange that its unit, Century Peak Corp. (CPC), and the province of Cavite have successfully concluded the detailed negotiations on the company’s unsolicited proposal for the reclamation of 1,333 hectares of land."


It really pays to be in the good graces of Malacanang


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