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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 9:28 pm 
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Pangilinan: Transfer of 10 convicts may be ‘a reward’ for testifying vs De Lima
By: Consuelo Marquez - Reporter / @CMarquezINQINQUIRER.net / 07:05 PM September 06, 2019


MANILA, Philippines — The transfer of 10 high-risk detainees in the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) in Muntinlupa City to the Marine barracks in Taguig City could be a reward for testifying against Senator Leila de Lima, an opposition senator said Friday.

Senator Francis Pangilinan made the remark as Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra earlier defended the transfer of the top-level convicts, saying it was not special treatment since it was for security reasons.

“More than a case of special treatment, one can’t help but wonder if this is part of the reward the convicts are receiving for weaving stories and testifying against Senator Leila de Lima,” Senator Francis Pangilinan said in a statement.

Pangilinan was also wary that the convict-witnesses could be given early freedom.

“We might wake up one day to reports that they have been released, while Sen. De Lima remains incarcerated for a crime she never committed,” he said.

De Lima is currently detained at Camp Crame in Quezon City due to drug charges.

The senator then dismissed Guevarra’s justification of the criminals’ transfer from Bilibid to the Philippine Marines compound, saying it merely proved the inability of NBP to protect prisoners.

“The explanation of Justice Secretary Guevarra that the transfer was for security reasons is a virtual admission of the inability of our prison system to safeguard inmates,” Pangilinan said.

Pangilinan pointed out that the 10 high-profile criminals were already inside NBP’s maximum security compound, which should be “heavily guarded and imposed with strictest security measures.” /kga





https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1161766/p ... vs-de-lima

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 2:37 pm 
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tiyanak2 wrote:
Pangilinan: Transfer of 10 convicts may be ‘a reward’ for testifying vs De Lima
By: Consuelo Marquez - Reporter / @CMarquezINQINQUIRER.net / 07:05 PM September 06, 2019


MANILA, Philippines — The transfer of 10 high-risk detainees in the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) in Muntinlupa City to the Marine barracks in Taguig City could be a reward for testifying against Senator Leila de Lima, an opposition senator said Friday.

Senator Francis Pangilinan made the remark as Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra earlier defended the transfer of the top-level convicts, saying it was not special treatment since it was for security reasons.

“More than a case of special treatment, one can’t help but wonder if this is part of the reward the convicts are receiving for weaving stories and testifying against Senator Leila de Lima,” Senator Francis Pangilinan said in a statement.

Pangilinan was also wary that the convict-witnesses could be given early freedom.

“We might wake up one day to reports that they have been released, while Sen. De Lima remains incarcerated for a crime she never committed,” he said.

De Lima is currently detained at Camp Crame in Quezon City due to drug charges.

The senator then dismissed Guevarra’s justification of the criminals’ transfer from Bilibid to the Philippine Marines compound, saying it merely proved the inability of NBP to protect prisoners.

“The explanation of Justice Secretary Guevarra that the transfer was for security reasons is a virtual admission of the inability of our prison system to safeguard inmates,” Pangilinan said.

Pangilinan pointed out that the 10 high-profile criminals were already inside NBP’s maximum security compound, which should be “heavily guarded and imposed with strictest security measures.” /kga





https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1161766/p ... vs-de-lima

Winning the senate may be a reward for marrying Sharon Cuneta. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 3:01 pm 
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so true...








except for the roxas couple.. 'twas a meant to be...









a disaster




:lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 3:37 pm 
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tiyanak2 wrote:
so true...








except for the roxas couple.. 'twas a meant to be...









a disaster




:lol: :lol: :lol:

May balat yata sa puwet either si Mar o si Korina. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 12:13 pm 
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IceColdBeer wrote:
tiyanak2 wrote:
so true...








except for the roxas couple.. 'twas a meant to be...









a disaster




:lol: :lol: :lol:

May balat yata sa puwet either si Mar o si Korina. :lol: :lol: :lol:



parang yung movie ni Tito Vic and Joey na may mga balat sa pwet


:lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2019 5:24 pm 
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Drug courier slain; P27-million shabu seized
Non Alquitran (The Philippine Star) - September 16, 2019 - 12:00am



MANILA, Philippines — A suspected courier for a drug ring operating in Metro Manila was killed in what police said was a shootout during a sting in Cubao, Quezon City yesterday that yielded around four kilos of shabu worth P27.2 million.

National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) director Maj. Gen. Guillermo Eleazar said they were validating reports that slain suspect Edgardo Alfonso, 50, was working for a drug convict at the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) in Muntinlupa.

“We received information that Alfonso was the courier or operator of a drug lord outside the NBP,” Eleazar said.

Police said Alfonso, of Barangay Tramo in Pasig City, had been placed under surveillance by the NCRPO Regional Drug Enforcement Unit amid reports that he was behind the distribution of drugs in the metropolis.

Anti-narcotics agents were able to close a P1.5-million drug deal with the suspect at a gasoline station at the corner of P. Tuazon Boulevard and 18th Avenue in Barangay San Roque at around 5:50 a.m.

After handing over a kilo of shabu to a policeman who posed as a buyer, Alfonso sensed the presence of police.

The suspect tried to escape as he reportedly fired at the policemen, but he was neutralized in the ensuing gunfight.

Alfonso died at the scene from gunshots to the body.

Police said they recovered a .45-caliber handgun and the marked money from the suspect.

Another three kilos of shabu were found in Alfonso’s backpack, according to authorities.

Eleazar said he ordered his men to track down Alfonso’s cohorts as couriers of the drug convict.

“Our informants provided us information regarding Alfonso’s drug activities and we are working on the group’s neutralization,” Eleazar said.

He added that Alfonso was a high-value target of the NCRPO.

The seized drugs were brought to the crime laboratory of the Philippine National Police for examination.

Police said the neutralization of Alfonso would help reduce the proliferation of drugs in the metropolis.


Drug surrenderee nabbed

In San Juan City, a drug surrenderee was arrested yesterday during a raid on his house in Barangay West Crame.

Jason Servania, alias Ivler, 30, allegedly yielded 12 sachets of shabu and drug sniffing paraphernalia, according to city police chief Col. Jaime Santos.

Police said Servania was nabbed based on a search warrant issued by Judge Danilo Cruz of the Pasig City Regional Trial Court Branch 152 for violating Republic Act 9165 or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act.

Servania had surrendered to police under Oplan Tokhang in 2016.

He failed to continue his drug rehabilitation program launched by the city government to reform drug users and pushers who voluntarily surrendered to authorities.

Probers said they received information that Servania had allegedly returned to drug pushing, prompting police to conduct an operation against him.

Servania did not resist arrest when a police team headed by Capt. Edwin Malabanan, head of the station’s drug enforcement unit, served the search warrant at his house.

The suspect was detained at the San Juan police station pending his transfer to the court. – With Romina Cabrera


Read more at https://www.philstar.com/nation/2019/09 ... 2AtTyZK.99

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2019 11:52 pm 
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NCRPO, PDEA seize P204-M shabu, nab suspect tied to drug convicts
Published September 16, 2019 10:15pm



Members of the National Capital Region Police Office and the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency on Monday night seized 30 kilos of shabu worth P204 million at a condominium building in Pasig City.

The authorities also arrested suspect Manolito Lugo Carlos alias Lito and Tonge at the Sorrento Oasis Residences on C. Raymundo Avenue, Pasig City.

Carlos is allegedly involved with convicted drug personalities now serving sentence at the National Bilibid Prison, Muntinlupa City.

He is said to be the right hand man of a convicted drug lord and is in cgarghe of the storage and distribution of illegal drugs.

Police said Carlos was a high-profile drug personality and was among major targets of NCRPO under a case operational plan.

"He is a main player of a syndicated organized gang engaged in the illegal drug trafficking operating in Metro Manila, Region 3 and Calabarzon," said the police in its report.

The NCRPO and PDEA raided condominium unit at 7:40 p.m. with a search warrant issued by Executive Judge Danilo Cruz of the Pasig City Regional Trial Court.

The government agents recovered 30 heat sealed plastic packs of shabu weighing a kilo each.

The street value of 30 kilos of shabu is pegged at P204 million.

Also recovered at the scene were assorted drug paraphernalia; and different bank deposit slips indicating therein the alleged amount of remmitances as payment for the illegal drugs. —Anna Felicia Bajo/NB, GMA News




https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/news/me ... _ataglance

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 1:03 am 
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PDEA still can’t destroy P22B worth of drugs in its custody
By: Christia Marie Ramos - Reporter / @CMRamosINQINQUIRER.net / 09:33 PM September 16, 2019




MANILA, Philippines — A total of P22 billion worth of illegal drugs confiscated in several anti-drug operations are still in the custody of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA), including 300 kilograms of crystal meth, or shabu, that were seized nine years ago.

PDEA Director General Aaron Aquino himself disclosed this on Monday during the hearing of the Senate finance subcommittee on his agency’s proposed 2020 budget.

The senators at the hearing had asked him about the status of the PDEA inventory.

“There’s a large seizure, especially for 2019,” Aquino said. “From January to August alone, we have seized around P10 billion worth of drugs.”

“And this is mainly due to the failure of the judges to issue the order to destroy?” Sen. Panfilo Lacson, who presided over the hearing, asked Aquino.

“We still have drugs seized in 2010,” the PDEA chief said in Filipino. “In the Las Piñas raid, there were more than 300 kilograms. Sir, there’s no court order [to destroy the drugs].”

Senate Minority Leader Franklin Drilon noted that he had repeatedly suggested to PDEA in past budget hearings to “sit down with the court administrator.”

“There is nothing wrong with that, you sit down with the court administrator,” he said. “Point out this provision of law and express your disappointment at the lack of cooperation of the judges in authorizing PDEA or whoever to follow the procedure of destroying the evidence.”

He was referring to Section 21 of the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002, which says: “After the filing of the criminal case, the Court shall, within seventy-two (72) hours, conduct an ocular inspection of the confiscated, seized and/or surrendered dangerous drugs, plant sources of dangerous drugs, and controlled precursors and essential chemicals, including the instruments/paraphernalia and/or laboratory equipment.”

The law also says: “The PDEA shall within twenty-four (24) hours thereafter proceed with the destruction or burning of the same, in the presence of the accused or the person/s from whom such items were confiscated and/or seized, or his/her representative or counsel, a representative from the media and the DOJ, civil society groups and any elected public official.”

Aquino said he did follow Drilon’s suggestion.

He said he talked with Court Administrator Midas Marquez and raised the agency’s concern over the delay of issuing court orders to destroy the confiscated drugs.

According to him, Marquez said it was easier said than done.

Aquino said court representatives should inspect the evidence 72 hours after filing a case. Then it would take PDEA another 24 hours to destroy the drugs.

“So in short, every four days we should be burning the drugs. This has not been followed, sir,” he said.

“On our side, we have no proposal for a timeline on how to do it,” he added. “So they said they would study it, and in the meantime, they will give a circular to all RTC (regional trial court) judges to expedite the prescribed 72 hours.”

The circular, however, had not been issued, he said.

Drilon wondered why PDEA needed a court order to destroy the drugs seized in the 2010 Las Piñas operation that Aquino earlier mentioned.

Drilon admitted that 72 hours waiting for an order might not be practical.

But he said: “Ten years is too much. Why can we not secure the authorization in the last 10 years for this particular apprehension?”

“We filed a motion for the destruction of drugs,” Aquino said. “In fact, the judge already conducted an ocular inspection. The problem, sir, is that after so many years that we’ve been asking for a court order for the destruction, we have been denied. I really don’t know why.”
“Now we are sending letters again. Why is it that they are denying our request?” he added.

Drilon then offered to join a meeting between PDEA and the Supreme Court (SC) — “just to emphasize to them that this is a matter which is serious.”

Following the discussion, Lacson suggested another hearing to tackle the issue.

“We will plead with the SC to put its foot down on judges who refuse to abide by the law to follow the implementation that within 72 hours the confiscated drugs should be destroyed,” Lacson, speaking partly in Filipino, told reporters in an interview.

“So we will plead with the SC to find a way to help PDEA — maybe through the intercession of the Senate — to fast-track or expedite the destruction of drugs,” he added.

/atm



https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1165253/p ... ts-custody

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 1:03 am 
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Corrupt cops still 'selling, recycling' illegal drugs: PDEA chief
Dharel Placido, ABS-CBN News
Posted at Sep 16 2019 10:57 AM | Updated as of Sep 16 2019 04:01 PM




MANILA (UPDATE) - Unscrupulous cops recycle illegal drugs seized during narcotics operations, the head of an agency tasked to lead President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs said Monday, in a stunning admission that could again put doubts on the credibility of the government's drug war.


Several sources have confirmed that unscrupulous anti-narcotics agents use the seized illegal drugs to either sell them or use them as planted evidence in bogus operations, said Philippine Drug Enforcement Authority (PDEA) Director General Aaron Aquino.

“There are still reports [of recycling of illegal drugs]… It’s still rampant, especially [among] operatives down [the line],” Aquino told senators during his agency’s budget hearing.

“Ang usually nagiging modus, maybe half of that will be surrendered, iyon ang ipapalabas na na-seize, the other one will be kept, either for future operations [or be sold],” he added.

(The usual modus is, maybe half of that will be surrendered and be presented as the seized drugs, the other one will be kept, either for future operations or be sold.)

He said some P22 billion worth of seized illegal drugs, P20 billion of which are shabu, remain in the government’s inventory.

Aquino also revealed that a “drug queen”, who is behind the buying of seized drugs from unscrupulous law enforcement agents, is now the subject of the PDEA’s operations.

Senate Minority Floor Leader Franklin Drilon, who brought up the issue on the pilferage of seized illegal drugs, said Aquino’s revelation was worrisome and a “serious bipartisan concern.”

“I admire your candor, Director General Aquino, but it causes a concern, because the people who are given the task of solving our enforcing the law in so far as drug trafficking is concerned are the ones who lead the anomalous practices,” Drilon said.

Aquino blamed the courts’ slow issuance of orders to destroy seized drugs for the buildup of the government’s seized drugs inventory. He noted that the oldest illegal drugs in the government’s custody is 9 years old.

Drilon said he is willing to help the PDEA press the judiciary to act swiftly on requests to sanction the destruction of seized illegal drugs.

Sen. Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa, meanwhile, challenged Aquino to present proof on his claims, as he sought to defend the efforts of the Philippine National Police (PNP), an agency he once led, in ridding its ranks of bad eggs.

“In fairness to the PNP, it is doing its best to rid all the scalawags,” Dela Rosa said.

“Mahirap puro candor pero wala tayong leg to stand on sa ganoong accusation.”

(It's hard that you have candor but your accusation has no leg to stand on.)

LOSING THE WAR

Sen. Panfilo Lacson, who presided over budget hearing for the PDEA and the Dangerous Drugs Board, said the revelation shows that the government could be losing the war on drugs.

“In spite of so many accomplishments, battles may be won, but are we winning the war?” Lacson told reporters after the hearing.

“Apparently we are not winning the war because even the President in his latest SONA (State of the Nation Address), he said the problem of illegal drugs still persists. That’s a tacit admission we are not winning the war.”

Lacson said anti-narcotics officials should be required to wear body cameras during anti-narcotics operations so they would be deterred from pilfering seized illegal drugs.

Dela Rosa, known for making colorful comments, for his part said police should just immediately dump seized illegal drugs in the drainage.

“Why not gawin na lang natin on the spot pagkahuli ng shabu d'yan, kunan ng sample, hanap ka kaagad ng drainage, ibuhos ang shabu doon, tapos na wala ng problema, o kaya itapon na sa dagat?” he said.

(Why not after the seizure we just take a sample of the drugs and drain the rest or throw them into the sea?)

Aquino said requiring joint operations from various law enforcement agencies is one way of deterring the pilferage of seized illegal drugs. He also recommended an intensified internal cleansing among law enforcement agencies.

The government’s war on drugs has been heavily criticized for the mounting death toll linked to various anti-narcotics operations. But critics say some of the slain suspects, mostly poor ones, were killed in cold blood.

The PNP said 5,526 drug suspects were killed from July 1, 2016 until June 30.

The government routinely dismisses any criticism of the drug war, saying there is a presumption of regularity in all police operations.



https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/09/16/19/ ... pdea-chief

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 2:36 pm 
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Diokno: Docu on drug war could be used vs Duterte
By: Krixia Subingsubing - @inquirerdotnetPhilippine Daily Inquirer / 03:58 AM September 23, 2019


MANILA, Philippines — A documentary on the Philippines’ drug war that has been criticized by Malacañang can be used against President Rodrigo Duterte before the International Criminal Court (ICC).

This is what impressed human rights lawyer Jose Manuel “Chel” Diokno on watching “On the President’s Orders” at its Philippine premiere on Sept. 20.

“On the President’s Orders” is the first full-length documentary of the drug war on President Duterte’s watch. The film was made by Emmy award-winning filmmakers James Jones and Olivier Sarbil for the US television program “Frontline.”

The film’s Philippine premiere at the Film Center of the University of the Philippines was scheduled on the eve of the 47th anniversary of Ferdinand Marcos’ proclamation of martial law (its actual enforcement was on Sept. 23, 1972).

Observers have drawn parallels between President Duterte’s drug war and the martial law regime of the dictator Marcos.

Executive director Leni Velasco of Active Vista, which organized the International Human Rights Film Festival including Friday’s screening, cited such factors as the suppression of human rights and erosion of institutions.

Days before the film’s Philippine premiere, presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo criticized “On the President’s Orders” as “derogatory, black propaganda.”

For Diokno, who joined a panel of human rights advocates after the screening, any law student “could easily identify 20, 30, 40, even 50 violations” of the law just by watching the film.

Diokno even argued that the film could be presented before the ICC, which has begun to look into the drug war during President Duterte’s watch.

‘Killing field’

“In ICC cases, they have accepted press reports. But this film comes directly from the mouths of the officials,” Diokno said.

Jones, in an earlier interview with the Inquirer, said the police officials featured in the film “genuinely believed that the deaths were working and that the drug war is working.

Speaking to the audience via recorded video last Friday, Jones said Col. Jemar Modequillo, then Caloocan police chief, and Capt. Octavio Deimos, then the head of the Caloocan Special Weapons and Tactics team, “submitted themselves to cinematic scrutiny” even after the police had been sidelined in the drug war, following accusations of human rights violations.

Jones and Sarbil documented the city police at a time when Caloocan gained notoriety as a “killing field” in the drug war.

Aftermath

Modequillo had just been named chief of a police force plucked mostly from the regional police’s reserves, after the old ones were sacked in the aftermath of the deaths of teenagers Kian delos Santos, Carl Angelo Arnaiz and Reynaldo “Kulot” de Guzman, all in 2017.

Modequillo, who Jones said “loves the attention” and was a “charismatic character,” allowed the filmmakers access to nearly everything. This enabled them to capture the police as they descended into increasingly questionable behavior, as shown in the documentary.

In one scene, Deimos was shown on night patrol, stopping two boys, who looked no more than 15, on their way home.

One of the boys had another shirt tucked into his shorts with a print of a Nazarene image that bore the fifth commandment “Thou shall not kill.”

This scene elicited a nervous laughter among the audience.

“Maybe you are the one killing out here, huh,” Deimos said to the boy apparently as a joke.
In another scene, jail warden Master Sgt. Adolfo Agustin laughed as he hit a detainee’s hands with a heavy piece of wood.

“When the police kill, it’s legitimate… We are the enforcers of the law,” Deimos said in the film.

Diokno flagged these actual scenes in the documentary as “violations, if not of domestic laws, then of the international covenants and obligations.”

“Even our drug laws have very strict requirements for conducting searches, for taking inventories. Just stopping them on the streets and ordering them to remove what’s in their pocket [is not allowed],” he said.

‘Ignorance, stupidity’

But holding abusive policemen liable is difficult when the President himself has assured them immunity, said Human Rights Watch researcher Carlos Conde.

“The lesson of Duterte is that we not only allowed him to happen, we encouraged him to happen,” Conde said. “A lot of that has to do with our ignorance, with our stupidity, with our willingness to swallow whatever it is that he is telling us.”

Both Conde and Diokno believe it is necessary to document such violations as shown in the film.

He added, “I hope that when this madness ends, we will not make the same mistake as [when] the previous madness ended in 1986 and forgot to make and ensure that those people were held accountable.”



https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1168029/d ... vs-duterte

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 2:37 pm 
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Filipinos give thumbs up to Duterte's 'excellent' drugs war: poll


MANILA (Reuters) - Philippine citizens are overwhelmingly satisfied with President Rodrigo Duterte’s bloody war on drugs, a survey showed, giving a boost to a government outraged by an international push to investigate allegations of systematic murders by police.

The quarterly poll of 1,200 Filipinos by Social Weather Stations returned a rating of “excellent” for Duterte’s three-year campaign, with 82% satisfied due to a perception of less drugs and crime in the country.

That compared to 12% dissatisfied, because they believed the drug trade was still flourishing and there were too many killings and police abuses. The survey conducted by the independent pollster in late June had 6% undecided.

It was released two days after the leak of a presidential memo ordering departments and state-run firms to decline loans or aid from the 18 countries of the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) - among them Spain, Britain and Australia - that backed a resolution to investigate Duterte’s crackdown.

Police say they have killed more than 6,700 suspected drug dealers who all resisted arrest, and deny involvement in the mysterious murders of thousands more drug users.

Police reject allegations by human rights groups that they have executed targets, falsified reports and tampered with evidence and crime scenes.

Presidential spokesman, Salvador Panelo, said the poll showed that the international community had a warped understanding of what was happening.

“If it’s true that there are human rights violations then the people of this country will rise against this administration,” Panelo said on Monday.

“It’s not true that policemen just kill at will, they cannot do that,” he added.

The 47-member Council approved a resolution in July to compile a comprehensive report on the killings, which Manila’s foreign secretary said will not be permitted in the Philippines.

Panelo said domestic investigations had been undertaken already, and the U.N. resolution was “not only unfair, it’s an insult.”

The International Criminal Court has since last year been conducting a preliminary examination to determine if there are grounds to investigate Duterte. He has responded by cancelling the Philippines membership of the court.

Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director of Human Rights Watch, said domestic surveys showing support for Duterte and his campaign were exactly why an international probe was needed.

“It’s ridiculous to say there is any sort of serious national investigation into these crimes. It’s laughable,” he told news channel ANC.

“We have total impunity that continues to surround those who are involved in this,” he added.

Reporting by Martin Petty; editing by Darren Schuettler



https://www.reuters.com/article/us-phil ... SKBN1W803M

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 2:42 pm 
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BOC intercepts 6 boxes of liquid marijuana at Naia
By: Faye Orellana - Reporter / @FMOrellanaINQINQUIRER.net / 01:06 PM September 22, 2019


MANILA, Philippines — Agents of the Bureau of Customs (BOC) have seized six boxes of liquid marijuana at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (Naia), the agency said on Sunday.

According to the BOC-Naia, the package was initially declared as “ULEI CBD full plant extract” when imported in the country by sender Bayer Jasilica last Friday.

However, upon inspection and test conducted by the authorities, it tested positive for the presence of Tetrahydrocannabinol or liquid marijuana.

The boxes labeled “Lady Mary Farm Cannabidiol CBD Oil BIO” was reportedly shipped from the country Romania, BOC said.

The agency also identified the consignee of the package as Jeffrey Ciabal Perez of San Pablo City, Laguna.

A case was already filed against Perez for the Importation of Dangerous Drugs in the country, and for violation of the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act. /je



https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1167869/b ... na-at-naia

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:39 pm 
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nagtataka din naman ako dito sa mga ungas na ito


kapag may pagbabago na makakaapekto sa social order ng Pilipinas na pabor sa masang Pilipino,

tulad ng pagkontra sa salot ng droga, na ikinamamatay ng mga mismong tulak at adik sa drogang yan, at nagkakaisa ang sambayanan na nakakapag isip isip na nasa kamay nila ang tunay na pagdetermina ng tutoong mamumuno at magsisilbi sa kanila at hindi uunahin ang oligarchs--aba e pati ibang bansa, international organizations, intl media, nanghihimasok sa internal affairs natin :shock:

pero kapag may pangyayari naman na nagpapatuloy lang ng status quo ng ating social order na natural ay pabor sa elite ng ating bansa,

tulad ng pagmassacre ng hindi mabilang na magsasaka sa loob ng hindi mabilang na pagkakataon dahil sa kagustuhan ng isang angkan na kumapit sa lupang nakuha nila nuon na isasauli sa tao ang napagkasunduang kondisyon sa gobyerno na nagpautang sa kanila ng pambili sa naturang lupa....

...ay parang wala akong naalalang ganito kalaki ang atensyon ng mga yan :(



tiyanak2 wrote:
Diokno: Docu on drug war could be used vs Duterte
By: Krixia Subingsubing - @inquirerdotnetPhilippine Daily Inquirer / 03:58 AM September 23, 2019


MANILA, Philippines — A documentary on the Philippines’ drug war that has been criticized by Malacañang can be used against President Rodrigo Duterte before the International Criminal Court (ICC).

This is what impressed human rights lawyer Jose Manuel “Chel” Diokno on watching “On the President’s Orders” at its Philippine premiere on Sept. 20.

“On the President’s Orders” is the first full-length documentary of the drug war on President Duterte’s watch. The film was made by Emmy award-winning filmmakers James Jones and Olivier Sarbil for the US television program “Frontline.”

The film’s Philippine premiere at the Film Center of the University of the Philippines was scheduled on the eve of the 47th anniversary of Ferdinand Marcos’ proclamation of martial law (its actual enforcement was on Sept. 23, 1972).

Observers have drawn parallels between President Duterte’s drug war and the martial law regime of the dictator Marcos.

Executive director Leni Velasco of Active Vista, which organized the International Human Rights Film Festival including Friday’s screening, cited such factors as the suppression of human rights and erosion of institutions.

Days before the film’s Philippine premiere, presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo criticized “On the President’s Orders” as “derogatory, black propaganda.”

For Diokno, who joined a panel of human rights advocates after the screening, any law student “could easily identify 20, 30, 40, even 50 violations” of the law just by watching the film.

Diokno even argued that the film could be presented before the ICC, which has begun to look into the drug war during President Duterte’s watch.

‘Killing field’

“In ICC cases, they have accepted press reports. But this film comes directly from the mouths of the officials,” Diokno said.

Jones, in an earlier interview with the Inquirer, said the police officials featured in the film “genuinely believed that the deaths were working and that the drug war is working.

Speaking to the audience via recorded video last Friday, Jones said Col. Jemar Modequillo, then Caloocan police chief, and Capt. Octavio Deimos, then the head of the Caloocan Special Weapons and Tactics team, “submitted themselves to cinematic scrutiny” even after the police had been sidelined in the drug war, following accusations of human rights violations.

Jones and Sarbil documented the city police at a time when Caloocan gained notoriety as a “killing field” in the drug war.

Aftermath

Modequillo had just been named chief of a police force plucked mostly from the regional police’s reserves, after the old ones were sacked in the aftermath of the deaths of teenagers Kian delos Santos, Carl Angelo Arnaiz and Reynaldo “Kulot” de Guzman, all in 2017.

Modequillo, who Jones said “loves the attention” and was a “charismatic character,” allowed the filmmakers access to nearly everything. This enabled them to capture the police as they descended into increasingly questionable behavior, as shown in the documentary.

In one scene, Deimos was shown on night patrol, stopping two boys, who looked no more than 15, on their way home.

One of the boys had another shirt tucked into his shorts with a print of a Nazarene image that bore the fifth commandment “Thou shall not kill.”

This scene elicited a nervous laughter among the audience.

“Maybe you are the one killing out here, huh,” Deimos said to the boy apparently as a joke.
In another scene, jail warden Master Sgt. Adolfo Agustin laughed as he hit a detainee’s hands with a heavy piece of wood.

“When the police kill, it’s legitimate… We are the enforcers of the law,” Deimos said in the film.

Diokno flagged these actual scenes in the documentary as “violations, if not of domestic laws, then of the international covenants and obligations.”

“Even our drug laws have very strict requirements for conducting searches, for taking inventories. Just stopping them on the streets and ordering them to remove what’s in their pocket [is not allowed],” he said.

‘Ignorance, stupidity’

But holding abusive policemen liable is difficult when the President himself has assured them immunity, said Human Rights Watch researcher Carlos Conde.

“The lesson of Duterte is that we not only allowed him to happen, we encouraged him to happen,” Conde said. “A lot of that has to do with our ignorance, with our stupidity, with our willingness to swallow whatever it is that he is telling us.”

Both Conde and Diokno believe it is necessary to document such violations as shown in the film.

He added, “I hope that when this madness ends, we will not make the same mistake as [when] the previous madness ended in 1986 and forgot to make and ensure that those people were held accountable.”



https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1168029/d ... vs-duterte



kadalasan ang mga nagpapanggap na tupa na yan, ang siyang mga lobo na nambibiktima ng walang kamuwang muwang





:banghead: :verymad:

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 4:29 pm 
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Documentary na foreign funded gagamitin against PRRD? :shock: :biglaugh:

Sabay banat na naman si Sen. Narco este Marco Rubio ng US na ang bayaw eh connected sa droga na pakawalan daw si Delima dahil sa bogus charges na dumaan naman sa husgado at nakitaan ng probable cause. :roll:

Ewan ko ba saaan kumukuha ng kapal ng apog mga 'to kahit yung mga panaka nakang sumusulpot dito. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 4:55 pm 
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Pangilinan sees ‘disconnect’ in Filipinos’ approval of drug war in latest SWS poll
By CNN Philippines Staff
Published Sep 23, 2019 1:15:20 PM



Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, September 23) — There is a “disconnect” in Filipinos’ sentiments on the administration’s controversial anti-narcotics drive as shown in the result of the latest Social Weather Survey poll, opposition Senator Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan said Monday.

"Our own polling, when we did our deep canvassing, ang number one na hindi magandang nangyayari sa Pilipinas ngayon araw-araw ang patayan," the Liberal Party head told CNN Philippines’ The Source.

[Translation: Our own polling found out that the number one bad thing that happens in the country is the killings everyday.]

“That is on the surface that they approved of the war on drugs, but underneath that surface, there is a disconnect,” he added.

In its second quarter survey, the SWS said 82 percent of Filipinos are satisfied with the administration’s war on drugs. On the other hand, 12 percent were dissatisfied while 6 percent were undecided.


While he agreed with the poll results, Pangilinan said the survey outcome should be viewed "in its entirety.”

“If you look into the other aspects of the war on drugs, more than 90 percent believe that the addicts should not be killed and over 80 percent are afraid they may become collateral damage,” Pangilinan said.

“They don’t like the killings… our citizens believe that they should not be killed, our citizens don’t believe the police, na nanlaban itong mga ito. In other words, there is that issue of human rights violation and outright murder, and also the concern that they might get caught in the crossfire,” the senator added.

Meanwhile, Malacañang said the high approval rating is a “response to the critics” and proof that criticisms against the campaign are false.

“The survey shows 82 percent and it has been unchanged since two years ago I think. These are the people who know the circumstances on the ground,” Presidential Spokesperson Salvador “Sal” Panelo said in a media briefing.

“Kung talagang may problema tayo sa pang-aabuso lalabas sa survey ‘yun,” he also said.

[Translation: If there are really abuses, it will be reflected in the survey.]

Government data shows at least 6,600 people have been killed in anti-illegal drug operations since President Rodrigo Duterte took office in July 2016.

A United Nations Human Rights Council resolution in July, initiated by Iceland, called for an investigation of the anti-illegal drugs campaign and the perceived summary killings in the country. The administration, however, had maintained the Philippines will not allow UN investigators in the country.

Malacañang had ordered the suspension of talks on financial assistance from 18 countries -- including Iceland -- that backed the resolution.

The administration has argued it does not need the international community to intervene because it can investigate these cases, noting the murder conviction of three cops in the killing of then 17-year-old Kian delos Santos in a police operation in 2017. But human rights groups are saying it is not enough assurance justice will also be served in the cases of thousands of other victims.




https://www.cnnphilippines.com/news/201 ... drugs.html

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