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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:44 am 
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What really gives?

Please feel free to give any input or views, Pinoy folks


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:50 am 
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For the Philippines, caught between the US and China, trade war is an opportunity to move up the value chain

Lucio Blanco Pitlo III says the trade war may see mixed results for Manila, with some sectors actually gaining, but it should still be a sign that the Philippines needs to diversify and make higher-quality goods

As the trade war escalates between the US and China – the world’s two largest economies – their trade partners are becoming increasingly wary. The timing could not be more ominous for the Philippines, one of the world’s fastest-growing economies, a long-time ally of the United States trying to bolster its economic ties with China.

China and the US currently represent the largest and third-largest trade partners of the Philippines respectively, while the US, Hong Kong and mainland China form the country’s top three export markets, and China and the US constitute the largest and fourth-largest sources of its imports.
The Philippines is already experiencing high inflation and is still in the early stages of addressing its decades-old infrastructure deficit, so the trade war casts a long shadow over the country’s prospects. It is an active player in the increasingly integrated global supply and production chains through which goods bound for external markets like the US and China pass. There is potential for the trade war to disrupt this, inflicting collateral damage on national economies in the chain.

A total of 16.9 per cent of Philippine exports form part of China’s value chain, among the highest percentage in Southeast Asia. However, these only account for about 3.2 per cent of its GDP. In contrast, Malaysia and Singapore have higher exposure, at 7.3 per cent and 5.7 per cent respectively.
Migrant Filipino workers in export-oriented factories in Taiwan, South Korea and Japan who churn out intermediate or final goods destined for China, America or third-party markets may also be affected. Being less dependent on exports could give the country some breathing space, but its relatively high volume may eventually hurt it.

That said, there are also opportunities, in the form of trade diversification. With its young demography, burgeoning middle class, proficient manpower and increased investment in infrastructure, the Philippines has potential: it has emerged as the world’s top investment destination this year.
As such, the country can position itself to attract Chinese enterprises producing goods for the US, as well as American firms producing for the huge China market. Increasing labour costs on the Chinese mainland and the Philippines’ proximity to lucrative Asian markets can buttress its credentials as an alternative manufacturing hub. The country can also serve as an alternative supplier of goods (for example, fruits, fisheries and electronics) to both the US and China.

Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Ernesto Pernia has said a full-blown trade war would have a positive net effect on the Philippines, claiming that the country would gain millions of dollars in exports to the US, mainly electronic goods, if the trade war intensifies. This would alleviate the potential loss of imports from China.

In spite of the trade war, investment in the Philippines grew in the second quarter of 2018. Manufacturing received the most investment, followed by construction. The US is the third-largest prospective investor after Indonesia and Japan, with a 4-billion-peso (US$74 million) pledge, accounting for 12.9 per cent of total approved investments.

China, on the other hand, is looking for local partners to develop its first industrial estate in the country, which it says would be larger than its eight existing sites in Southeast Asia.

Efforts to boost the nation’s competitiveness can enhance its position. Tax reform and President Rodrigo Duterte’s “build, build, build” programme for infrastructure will go a long way in enticing foreign and domestic capital. This ambitious programme will help address traffic congestion and logistical constraints, generate jobs and spread development.

Last May, Duterte also signed the Ease of Doing Business Act, meant to cut bureaucratic red tape and streamline procedures for business applications. China Telecom and AT&T are among the foreign companies interested in becoming the country’s third telcoms player, breaking the prevailing duopoly and improving services.

World leaders must stand firm on trade after ‘poison pill’ pact

The trade war will greatly affect electronics, which amount to more than half of Philippine export revenue and nearly a quarter of its import bill, based on July 2018 figures.

American electronics companies producing goods in the Philippines that feed into China’s value chain and are eventually exported to the US and elsewhere may be hurt by the trade war.

Texas Instruments, one of the world’s largest producers of semiconductor chips, has production facilities in Baguio and the Clark Freeport and Special Economic Zone. Moog, another US company that has also set up shop in Baguio, is involved in the design and production of precision instruments with applications in the aerospace and industrial machinery sectors.

Such companies may feel the heat, as electronics were among the primary class of goods subject to higher tariffs by both the US and China.

Rising protectionism and attempts to roll back globalisation are worrying trends, but they are realities the Philippines must accept. Indeed, trade wars may force competing economies to turn more inward and self-reliant; the US is reviving manufacturing while China is hastening reform.

Thus, instead of being a spectator, the Philippines should take the trade war as a call to action. While stopgap measures can be implemented, cushioning the country from adversity requires resolute long-term action. Diversifying trade and investment partners is one way to mitigate risks.

The trade war highlights the importance of moving up the value chain. Building infrastructure, improving logistics, investment in human capital development and maximising technology transfer will enhance the Philippines’ competitiveness. Implementing critical policy reforms, such as easing the foreign ownership cap in certain target sectors, is also important.

Finally, as the country’s trade increasingly integrates with Asean and Northeast Asia (China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan), deepening ties with regional neighbours becomes imperative.

Lucio Blanco Pitlo III is a research fellow at the Asia-Pacific Pathways to Progress Foundation, a lecturer on Chinese Studies at Ateneo de Manila University and contributing editor (reviews) for the Asian Politics & Policy Journal. He also sits on the Board of the Philippine Association for China Studies

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diploma ... sland-stop


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:53 am 
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US most trusted Philippines ally – Pulse Asia
Helen Flores (The Philippine Star) - January 15, 2019 - 12:00am



MANILA, Philippines — The United States has remained the country most trusted by Filipinos, and Russia and China the least, according to the latest Pulse Asia survey.

The poll, taken from Dec. 14 to 21 last year, showed 84 percent of Filipinos saying the Philippines should extend “a great deal/fair amount of trust” to the US. This was higher than the 79 percent recorded in March 2017.



The US was followed by Japan and Australia with trust ratings of 75 percent and 72 percent, respectively. Great Britain/United Kingdom obtained 57 percent.


Reacting to the survey result, Malacañang expressed optimism Filipinos’ attitude toward China would change if the latter shows sincerity in its dealing with the Philippines.

“It’s understandable for Filipinos to feel that way... Because we’ve been used to the (United) States being our ally, so we are more used to engaging with America. Perhaps as we go along and witness the sincerity of China with respect to agreements between the two countries, their views might change,” presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo said at a press briefing yesterday.


Pressed why he thought a majority of poll respondents were distrustful of China despite President Duterte’s pro-Beijing statements, Panelo replied: “Not necessarily, it takes time for people to accept certain things that they are not used to.”

Meanwhile, in the case of Russia and China, most Filipinos say the Philippines should extend only “a little trust or no trust at all” to these countries at 54 percent and 60 percent, respectively.

Forty percent of Filipinos say the Philippines should not trust China too much.

The survey was conducted after the two-day visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping to the Philippines, where both countries signed numerous deals, including a possible joint exploration in the disputed West Philippine Sea.

Duterte had said he would like to strengthen ties with China and Russia, two global powers with shaky relations with the US.

While Filipinos still trust the US most, respondents from Mindanao – Duterte’s bailiwick – have a less trusting attitude toward the country.

It was in Mindanao that the US got its lowest rating at 74 percent.

Russia, on the other hand, obtained its highest score in Mindanao at 54 percent.

Nearly or exactly the same percentages of Metro Manilans and Mindanawons say the Philippines should give China either “a great deal/a fair amount of trust” (49 percent to 50 percent) or “a little/no trust at all” (50 percent).

China and Russia in Pulse Asia’s March 2017 poll also got the highest distrust rating at 63 and 56 percent, respectively.

As for regional organizations, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation got majority trust ratings at 82 percent and 80 percent, respectively.

Pulse Asia asked its 1,800 adult respondents nationwide the question: “Generally speaking, how much trust should the Philippines extend to (country/organization)?” – Alexis Romero


Read more at https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2019 ... E4Qgj32.99


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:14 am 
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OPINYON: Ang pagsakop ng Tsina sa bansang Pilipinas

https://idealknowledgeph.wordpress.com/ ... -ng-china/


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:25 am 
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Duterte says ‘be careful’ in targeting Chinese workforce in PH
by UNTV News and Rescue

MANILA, Philippines – President Rodrigo Duterte on Tuesday (November 27) said there is no question that illegal Chinese workers “should be deported.”

However, he noted that the government “should be careful” in making such decision because thousands of overseas Filipino workers might suffer Chinese retaliation.

“They should be deported,”the President said during the inauguration of the Bohol-Panglao International Airport on Tuesday.

“But in the same manner, you should be careful because when you point to the Chinese you also point yourself at us. There are so many thousands of Filipinos working there or went inside China as tourists and working there,” he warned.

This was President Duterte’s response to the call of the senators to launch a crackdown against foreign workers including Chinese following reports from the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) that from more than 110,000 alien employment permits issued to foreign workers in the country, more than 50,000 were given to Chinese nationals.

“There has to be an arrangement there. So if you think that you are at a loss or as a disadvantage because there are so many Chinese nationals working here, remember that we have the same equal amount of people, of Filipinos who are working in China,” the President concluded. – Marje Pelayo

https://untvweb.com/news/duterte-says-b ... rce-in-ph/


WTF, what’s the point of favoring China more than the US if it doesn’t directly benefit the locals? And with so many unemployed and underemployed smart and hard working Pinoys, why do lolo Digong gov't need hundred of thousands of workers from China? Smh


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:48 am 
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More illegal Chinese workers in Philippines

They are stealing jobs and raising property prices, claim senators

President Rodrigo Duterte's rapprochement with China, driven in most part by economic reasons, has unwittingly led to a huge influx of undocumented Chinese workers over the past two years.

They have been accused of not only elbowing Filipinos out of lucrative jobs but also jacking up property prices.

Labour officials and senior diplomats attending a Senate hearing yesterday admitted that at least 150,000 Chinese in the offshore gaming industry could be working without permits, but one senior lawmaker has suggested that the actual number may be double that.

The Labour Department issued 115,652 Alien Employment Permits (AEPs) from 2015 to last year. About 51,980 went to Chinese workers.

"We observe that there is indeed an upward trend in the issuance of AEPs," Labour Undersecretary Ciriaco Lagunzad told the Senate.

Some senators believe, however, that the latest numbers do not line up with facts on the ground.

"You go to shopping malls, condominiums. You'd think you were in China. I believe there are more than 200,000 (Chinese workers) here now... They are not just in gaming. They're also in restaurants, construction, mining," said Senator Joel Villanueva, head of the Senate committee leading an investigation into the issue.

Senator Franklin Drilon, a former labour secretary, said there could be as many as 400,000 Chinese working for gaming operators and other outsourcing companies that mostly service clients in China.

Nearly 2,000 illegal Chinese workers have been apprehended in the Philippines over the past two years.

The biggest haul was in 2016, when 1,200 Chinese employees of a gaming firm inside the Clark special economic zone in Pampanga province, an hour north of the capital, Manila, were rounded up.

In May last year, nine Chinese and an Indonesian were nabbed for operating dredging vessels and hauling black sand without permits.

That same year, in September, 34 Chinese were arrested at an online gaming company in Pasay city, south of Manila.

A Chinese chef was pilloried online in May after he was seen in a video beating up a Filipino waitress at his restaurant. Investigations showed that he did not have a work permit and could not even produce a passport.

Last week, 93 Chinese were arrested from another online gambling outfit, in Pasig city, east of Manila.

"We have so many of our countrymen looking for jobs abroad. When they leave, they are abused. Yet, there are jobs here that seem to be handed over to other nationals... Our workers shouldn't be robbed of jobs," said Mr Villanueva.

The large number of Chinese migrants has also led to spiralling property prices.

"With so many of them coming here, they are not just robbing Filipinos of jobs, but they're also taking away our homes," said Mr Villanueva. He cited a Facebook post that went viral here about a real estate agent looking for 400 condo units for 3,000 Chinese workers.

Condo rentals at the prime Manila Bay area, where many of the casinos and online gaming companies are headquartered, have risen by as much as 62 per cent in the first six months of the year. Property prices there now range from 45,700 pesos (S$1,200) to 76,200 pesos per sq ft.

Chinese buyers made up almost 30 per cent of residential reservation sales at SM Prime, the country's largest property developer, in the first quarter of last year.

Similarly, the share of Chinese nationals who bought homes from Ayala Land, another real estate giant, jumped to almost half of all sales to foreign buyers, last year. The figure was 30 per cent in 2016.

The Chinese migration has been sparked by Mr Duterte's push to have closer ties with Beijing.

He has pivoted towards Beijing since winning the presidency in 2016 as he courted Chinese investments to push Philippine growth through an ambitious US$169 billion (S$232 billion) infrastructure-building programme.

Chinese offshore gaming firms have particularly benefited from this rapprochement. They have set up operations in the Philippines to skirt tougher regulations on gambling in China.

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-as ... hilippines


This is sad. No wonder, lolo Digong wanted the PH to be a province of China. Of course, this involves easy corruption and personal embezzlement deals from his Camote gov't.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:52 am 
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More than 1,600 Chinese structures in South China Sea

https://www.rappler.com/nation/203380-c ... ers-report


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:56 am 
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Esperon: Philippines should protest China’s island-building in West Philippine Sea
By: Nestor Corrales - Reporter / @NCorralesINQ INQUIRER.net / 10:09 AM February 05, 2019


MANILA, Philippines – National Security Adviser Hemogenes Esperon Jr. believes the Philippines should go back to protesting China’s building of artificial islands in the West Philippine Sea rather than contesting every constructed facility they have built there.

“I think, for simplicity, we simply go back to our original protest. That of protesting the construction or building of an artificial island,” Esperon told INQUIRER.net in a text message on Monday night.

Esperon, who is also the chairman of Task Force West Philippine Sea, issued the statement after Chinese State-run Xinhua News Agency reported that China has built a maritime rescue center in the Kagitingan Reef, which is part of the Kalayaan Island Group.

Malacañang earlier said it would let Foreign Affairs Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr. “address the issue” but Locsin said he would wait for the assessment of Esperon.



READ: Locsin: Philippines must protest creation of China rescue center

Esperon said many facilities have already been built on the reclaimed Kagitingan Reef, which Beijing calls Yongshu Reef.

“Kagitingan now has two harbors, an airstrip, and many buildings, among others. Without constructing anything else, it could be the HQs for rescue operations. Why, it could even be declared by the Chinese as an observatory or a marine cultured coral farm site. Or a drug rehabilitation center. Or a flying school,” he said.

“Now, which of those need to be verified? Which of the examples would you protest or contest? he asked.

Malacañang earlier said the Philippines should be “thankful” to China if it indeed built a maritime rescue center on the Kagitingan Reef.

“Maybe we should be thankful,” Presidential Spokesperson Salvador Panelo said, as long as “it does not conflict with our sovereignty.”

China claims nearly all of the 3.5 million-square-kilometer South China Sea, including waters close to the Philippines and nearby countries.

The Philippines won its arbitration case against China in July 2016, but President Rodrigo Duterte has chosen to set aside the ruling as Manila pursued warmer ties with Beijing, which has been strained due to our maritime row. /muf



Read more: https://globalnation.inquirer.net/17293 ... z5g7urh86r
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:59 am 
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'China finishing West Philippine Sea buildings that could house missiles'
Idrees Ali, Reuters
Posted at Feb 22 2017 09:01 AM | Updated as of Feb 22 2017 04:53 PM

WASHINGTON, Feb 22 (Reuters) - China, in an early test of U.S. President Donald Trump, has nearly finished building almost two dozen structures on artificial islands in the South China Sea that appear designed to house long-range surface-to-air missiles, two U.S. officials told Reuters.

The development is likely to raise questions about whether and how the United States will respond, given its vows to take a tough line on China in the South China Sea.

China claims almost all the waters, which carry a third of the world's maritime traffic. Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam also have claims. Trump's administration has called China's island building in the South China Sea illegal.

Building the concrete structures with retractable roofs on Subi, Mischief and Fiery Cross reefs, part of the Spratly Islands chain where China already has built military-length airstrips, could be considered a military escalation, the U.S. officials said in recent days, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"It is not like the Chinese to build anything in the South China Sea just to build it, and these structures resemble others that house SAM batteries, so the logical conclusion is that's what they are for," said a U.S. intelligence official, referring to surface-to-air missiles.

Another official said the structures appeared to be 20 meters (66 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) high.

A Pentagon spokesman said the United States remained committed to "non-militarization in the South China Sea" and urged all claimants to take actions consistent with international law.

In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said on Wednesday he was aware of the report, though did not say if China was planning on placing missiles on the reefs.

"China carrying out normal construction activities on its own territory, including deploying necessary and appropriate territorial defense facilities, is a normal right under international law for sovereign nations," he told reporters.

In his Senate confirmation hearing last month, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson raised China's ire when he said Beijing should be denied access to the islands it is building in the South China Sea.

Tillerson subsequently softened his language, and Trump further reduced tensions by pledging to honor the long-standing U.S. "one China" policy in a Feb. 10 telephone call with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

LONGER RANGE

Greg Poling, a South China Sea expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said in a December report that China apparently had installed weapons, including anti-aircraft and anti-missile systems, on all seven of the islands it has built in the South China Sea.

The officials said the new structures were likely to house surface-to-air missiles that would expand China's air defense umbrella over the islands. They did not give a time line on when they believed China would deploy missiles on the islands.

"It certainly raises the tension," Poling said. "The Chinese have gotten good at these steady increases in their capabilities."

On Tuesday, the Philippines said Southeast Asian countries saw China's installation of weapons in the South China Sea as "very unsettling" and have urged dialogue to stop an escalation of "recent developments."

Philippine Foreign Secretary Perfecto Yasay did not say what provoked the concern but said the 10-member Association of South East Asian Nations, or ASEAN, hoped China and the United States would ensure peace and stability.

POLITICAL TEST

The U.S. intelligence official said the structures did not pose a significant military threat to U.S. forces in the region, given their visibility and vulnerability.

Building them appeared to be more of a political test of how the Trump administration would respond, he said.

"The logical response would also be political – something that should not lead to military escalation in a vital strategic area," the official said.

Chas Freeman, a China expert and former assistant secretary of defense, said he was inclined to view such installations as serving a military purpose - bolstering China's claims against those of other nations - rather than a political signal to the United States.

"There is a tendency here in Washington to imagine that it's all about us, but we are not a claimant in the South China Sea," Freeman said. "We are not going to challenge China's possession of any of these land features in my judgment. If that's going to happen, it's going to be done by the Vietnamese, or ... the Filipinos ... or the Malaysians, who are the three counter-claimants of note."

He said it was an "unfortunate, but not (an) unpredictable development."

Tillerson told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee last month that China's building of islands and putting military assets on them was "akin to Russia's taking Crimea" from Ukraine.

In his written responses to follow-up questions, he softened his language, saying that in the event of an unspecified "contingency," the United States and its allies "must be capable of limiting China's access to and use of" those islands to pose a threat.

https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/02/22/17/ ... e-missiles


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 10:01 am 
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Panelo: PHL must be thankful China built center on West Philippine Sea
By Bernadette D. Nicolas - February 1, 2019

https://businessmirror.com.ph/2019/02/0 ... er-on-wps/



TABOGO (Tanga, Bobo, Gag o) !!!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:06 am 
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Authorities rescue Australian national; 4 Chinese kidnappers apprehended
By: Christia Marie Ramos - Reporter / @CMRamosINQ
INQUIRER.net / 09:33 PM February 21, 2019

MANILA, Philippines — Anti-kidnapping operatives rescued an Australian national and arrested his four kidnappers in Makati City on Wednesday.

Authorities identified the victim as 29-year-old Jianting Chen, an Australian who arrived in the Philippines last February 17.

The Anti-kidnapping group (AKG) of the Philippine National Police said Rachel Ball, a member of the Australian police, informed them that the victim’s friend, Willian Choi, who is residing in Hong Kong, reported the kidnapping incident to the Australian embassy.

Chen reportedly informed Choi that he was kidnapped through a messaging app, The kidnappers allegedly demanded RMB 200,000 in exchange for Chen’s freedom.

Authorities said Chen was kidnapped on February 19 in Pasay City. He was rescued the following day along Calantas St. in Barangay San Juan in Makati City.

Police apprehended the four Chinese kidnappers — three male and one female, identified as You Hua Wu, 30; Zhao Ping Zheng, 29; Hao Meng Li, 35; and Xue Zhao, 28.

The suspects, who were turned over to the AKG for the temporary custody, were charged with Kidnaping for Ransom. They will undergo inquest proceedings at the Department of Justice. /ee

Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1088632/a ... z5gD2j3Ngf
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook


O ayan lolo president ang resulta ng friendlier ties mo sa China, you offered them a visa-free travel to our country - convenient access. Andami ng tsekwang illegal workers sa Pinas and some were on illegal activities also. Di ka pa ba nakokonsyensya sa ginawa mo? Ah, sorry wala ka nga pala nun.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:09 am 
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More than 3 million Chinese allowed entry into Philippines since 2016 — Immigration
data

Ian Nicolas Cigaral (philstar.com) - June 9, 2018 - 1:00pm

https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018 ... ation-data


Imagine nung June 2018 pa yan ha, ilan na kaya ang nilobo nyan ngayon?
Oh Philippines is now really a province of China, as per Dutae's own words.
Smh


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 8:40 am 
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Duterte - TUTA ng mga Intsik!

FACT.



:biglaugh:


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 7:57 am 
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Duterte does not favor deporting illegal Chinese workers

NO DEPORTATION. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte says let the Chinese workers illegally working in the Philippines be. File photo by Ted Aljibe/AFP

MANILA, Philippines – President Rodrigo Duterte took a tolerant stance on the influx of Chinese workers in the Philippines.

In his speech at the PDP-Laban event in Laguna, the President said that the number of illegal Chinese workers in the country "equals" the number of undocumented Filipino workers in China.

"'Yung mga Chinese dito, hayaan mo 'yan na dito magtrabaho. Hayaan mo. Bakit? We have 300,000 Filipinos in China kaya hindi ako makasabi, 'Oh, umalis kayo dito. Deport ka doon,'" Duterte said.

(Allow the Chinese work here. Let them be. Why? We have 300,000 Filipinos in China that's why I can't say, "Oh, leave this country. We'll have you deported.")

Duterte then posed the question: "Eh kung umalis 'yung [300,000] of them?" (What if the 300,000 of them were asked to leave?)

The Philippine consulate-general in Hong Kong earlier estimated that 200,000 OFWs are working as maids in mainland China, with most of the workers recruited from Hong Kong.

Meanwhile, industry insiders estimated that there are some 100,000 to 250,000 Chinese nationals employed illegally in the country.

In his recent opinion piece on Manila Times, Special Envoy to China Ramon Tulfo described Duterte's stance on illegal Chinese workers as "tolerant." Tulfo wrote the piece after he met with the President, who visited Hong Kong for a "family trip" mid-February.

"The President said there were many Filipino workers who are illegally employed in China, but the Chinese government tolerates their stay as long as they're not committing any crime," Tulfo said.

Rise of Chinese nationals in the Philippines

In November 2018, ABS-CBN reported that the President approved of the deportation of illegal Chinese workers, but should be done "carefully."

Duterte said then that China "has not deported" any illegal Filipino workers yet, citing possible backlash if there would be a government crackdown on undocumented Chinese workers in the Philippines.

But lawmakers and various groups raised alarm over the influx of Chinese workers in the country who "take away" the jobs meant for Filipinos. (READ: Gov’t income and jobs for Filipinos ‘lost’ to Chinese workers – Villanueva)

From 2015 to 2018, Department of Labor and Employment had issued 169,893 alien working permits (AEP), 85,496 of which went to Chinese workers. (READ: How China’s online gambling addiction is reshaping Manila)

AEPs, valid up to 3 years, are required to get a working visa in the country.

Meanwhile, the Bureau of Immigration said it issued 185,000 special work permits from January to November 2018. Of the current valid SWPs, 64,087 of the total 72,010 were given to Chinese nationals. – Rappler.com


Tanginang pangulo yan ng Pinas, tabogo na duwag pa!
Napakalaki naman ng diperensya ng illegal vs legal.
Yon mga Pinoy workers sa China, mga legal yon!
TABOGO talaga si lolo Dutae.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 11:16 am 
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South China Sea: Indonesia And Vietnam Prove Duterte Wrong

Indonesia joined Vietnam recently to challenge Duterte’s doctrine in the South China Sea.

That’s the notion that any Asian-Pacific country that dares to tame Beijing’s ambitions to control the entire South China Sea will face war with China.

This week, Indonesia drew a “red line” in the South China Sea establishing fishing rights in areas where China claims “overlapping” rights, according to BenarNews.

Indonesia’s move comes roughly two years after the country renamed its maritime region in the southwest part of the South China Sea as the “North Natuna Sea,” asserting sovereignty in the area.

Meanwhile, Vietnam has been taken its own steps to tame Beijing’s ambitions to control the South China Sea. Last month, Hanoi pushed for a pact to outlaw many of China’s ongoing activities in the South China Sea. Like the building of artificial islands, blockades and offensive weaponry such as missile deployments; and the Air Defense Identification Zone—a conduct code China initiated back in 2013.

These activities are part of Beijing’s efforts to assert complete dominance in the South China Sea and push the US out.

“Although China does not want to usurp the United States’ position as the leader of the global order, its actual aim is nearly as consequential,” says Oriana Skylar Mastro in “The Stealth Superpower: How China Hid Its Global Ambitions,”published in the January/February issue of Foreign Affairs. “In the Indo-Pacific region, China wants complete dominance.; it wants to force the United States out and become the region’s unchallenged political, economic, and military hegemon.”

That’s why America has stepped up patrols in disputed South China Sea waters, asserting its willingness to keep the waterway an open sea to all commercial and military vessels.

And that has provided some sort of insurance for Indonesia and Vietnam against an unmeasured response from China.

Meanwhile, Indonesia’s and Vietnam’s moves have proved Duterte wrong: standing up to China doesn’t lead to war.

So far, financial markets in the region have been discounting these developments as “noise,” rather than something more serious, focusing instead on the trade war between Beijing and Washington. But they could come back to haunt markets once the trade war is settled.

A growing conflict between China on the one side and America on the other over who will write the navigation rules for the South China Sea raises geopolitical risks for the global economy. And it adds to investor anxieties over the fate of international trade and the economic integration of the Asia-Pacific region.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourd ... 0245e1e858

Eh TUTA nga kasi si lolo ng China tapos me malaki pang kutongan kaya ayun sinanla ng ang kanyang kaluluwa sa demonyo.


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