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How accurate is our written history?
100% 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
75% 14%  14%  [ 1 ]
50% 29%  29%  [ 2 ]
20% 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
10% 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
1% 57%  57%  [ 4 ]
Total votes : 7
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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 8:35 pm 
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continuation from page nine (9) of quotes from history about pre-colonial Filipinos.

Raiding continued...

The Moro's

From the book Swish of the Kris, by Vic Hurley

"The Southern Filipino ships were faster and swifter than the European ships of that period and they enjoyed the supremacy of the seas until 1860 when the steam vessels arrived on the scene.”

From the book Iranun and Balangingi: Globalization, maritime raiding and the birth of ethnicity, by James Warren.

On the heirarchy in a pirate ship

"In addition to the ordinary crew and oarsmen, every joanga (a raiding vessel) carried a large force of armed fighting men trained to serve on land or sea between 60 and 80 on the larger vessels. These warriors, renowned for their martial skill, discipline and courage, played no part in sailing the long ships and complement carried on board was there simply to wage war on land and sea. The exception to this rule was the Iban and Alforean warriors whose extraordinary stamina made them ideal candidates to pull at the sweeps in an emergency. These fighting men were armed with shields, spears, two-handed lanun swords, axes, and muskets, and pistols. Standing on the raised upper deck or fighting platform, 40 or 50 of these screaming warriors, dressed in bullet-proof, sleeveless scarlet jackets padded with kapok, or wearing various pieces of armor and chain mail, made a terrifying sight as their joanga swept alongside a merchant prahu or descended upon a hapless village"

from the same book:

"The Iranun warriors, like the Vikings, were worldly raiders who traveled in search of slaves and work, sometimes for years on end, around the great ports of Manila, Makassar, Batavia, Penang, and Singapore. They often spoke a variety of languages, and were familiar with the traditions and religions of all quarters of Southeast Asia. Some were literate, able to negotiate ransom, or unravel the intricacy of colonial legal system and they were knowledgeable in martial arts, weapons manufacture and seamanship."

from the same book:

"These special warriors were bound together by near total loyalty and strict discipline. Their code of conduct meant that there was no place for shame and dishonor and they would never abandon their commander and companions in battle. an Iranun warrior never expected any quarter particularly from Europeans and hence were prepared to follow their commander to his death if called upon to do so."

From the book The Philippine Islands: A political, geographical, ethnographical, social and commercial history of the Philippine archipelago embracing the whole period of Spanish rule, by John Foreman.

"They are very long-suffering in adversity, hesitating in attack, and the bravest of the brave in defence. They disdain work as degrading and only a fit occupation for slaves, whilst warfare is, to their minds, an honourable calling. Every male over 16 years of age has to carry at least one fighting-weapon at all times, and consider himself enrolled in military service."

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 9:04 pm 
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Quotes in history about pre-colonial Filipinos

Mercenary

During the war between the Sultan of Malacca against the Portuguese in 1525. Chronicler Joao de Barros, having witnessed the ferocity of the Tagalog mercenaries in battle described them as...

"the most warlike and valiant of these parts"

Gen. William Draper, head of the British fleet that captured Manila in 1762 said...

"They never retreated and they fought like mad dogs, gnawing at our bayonets"

Referring to the Kapampangan fighters that resisted them.

The people of Luzon were not raiders/pirates. Iba ang raket nila; Mercenary.

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 10:09 pm 
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Pre-colonial Philippines

Religion

Before the arrival of the Abrahamic religions (Christianity and Islam) to the islands. Most of the pre-colonial Filipinos practiced Hindu-Buddhism and animism; similar to our Asian neighbors.

Golden Kinnari idol

Image

Found in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology.

Was originally found in Surigao del sur as part of the Surigao treasure. Dated 10th-13th Century.

Showcased in Ayala museum.

According to archeologists, this design is unique to the Philippines.

Golden Tara

Image

a golden figure of a Buddhist diety. Dated 850-950 C.E.

Found in the Agusan del sur by a Manobo woman after a storm and flood in 1917.

Showcased in Field Museum in Chicago. :(

Manunggul Jar

Image

A secondary burial jar found in Manunggul cave in Palawan. Dated late neolithic period, about 890-710 B.C.

According to archeologists, its intricate design is unrivaled in South East Asia and was probably made by a master potter.

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 10:19 pm 
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I think ang significance ng Manunggul jar is yung mga nagsasagwan na human figure sa taas nung banga.

Some of our ancestors believe na when people die tatawid sila sa isang ilog in the after life.

Other cultures also believe in something similar to this. If I'm not mistaken the Greeks, the Egyptians and the Japanese.

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 11:11 pm 
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Kindly allow me to transfer this post ko from page nine, here to page ten. Para madaling hanapin, sama sama na sila.

Here are some quotes from history about pre-colonial Filipinos.

Raiding

From the book Barangay: Sixteenth century Philippine culture and society, by William Henry Scott.

"Wars were therefore fought to control people, not territory. They were waged by raids intended to seize slaves outright, to initiate or enforce alliances for trading networks, and to take booty to cover costs in any case. They were fought not by standing armies or navies loyal to some super-ordinate political authority, but by citizen warriors owing personal allegiance to leaders who were physically present.”

About the Visayans:

From the book Barangay: sixteenth century Philippine culture and society, by William Henry Scott

"The most celebrated form of Visayan warfare was sea raiding, mangayaw, a word which appeared in all major languages in the Philippines. Its root appears to be kayaw (for example, Ilocano kinayawan, captive) though Spanish lexicographers extracted ayaw, ngayaw, and agaw, and it meant a raid to bring back slaves or heads. There is no record of Visayan headhunting; that is, warfare for the specific purpose of taking heads, but heads were cut off in the course of battle or murder. Pedro de Arana lost his head during the occupation of Cebu. Luba, pagot, sumbali, and tongol all meant to behead, and tongol was also the dress plumage displayed at the stern of a warship.”

From the book Philippine Quarterly of Culture and Society by Efren Isorena.

"Chau Ju-Kua writing in the thirteenth century.

The language of the P'i-she-yeh (Visaya) can not be understood and traders do not resort to the country. The People go naked and are in a state of primitive savagery like beasts.

The savages come to make raids and as their coming cannot be foreseen, many of our people have been victim to their depredation, a great grief to the people. During the Period Shun-Hi (1174-1190 AD) their chiefs are in a habit of assembling parties of several hundreds to make sudden attacks on the villages of Shi-au and Wei-tou in Tsuan-Chou-fu, where they gave free course to their savage instincts, slaying men without number and women too, after they had raped them.

They were fond of iron vessels... one could get rid of them by closing the entrance door, from which they would only wrench the iron knocker and go away. When attacking an enemy, they are armed with Javelins to which are attached to a rope of over a hundred feet in length, in order to recover them after throwing, for they put such value on the iron of which these weapons are made, that they can not bear to loose them."

Visayan Ritual before raiding...
From the book Barangay: Sixteenth Century Philippine culture and society, by William Henry Scott.

"The sacrifice that was performed on launching a warship for a raid was called pagdaga, and it was considered most effective if the prow and keel were smeared with blood of a victim from the target community."

On fighting other ships using projectiles, during the battle of bangkusay...

"Normal for open combat were bamboo spears with fire-hardened wooden points, their last section loaded with sand for better balance, or, most common of all, the sugob, a length of sharpened bagakay bamboo. From the fighting decks of karakoa cruisers, 30-centimeter long spikes or javelins of heavy hardwood pointed at both ends were thrown in large numbers with an accuracy which attracted the attention of all foreign observers. All these missiles were ordinarily poisoned with bulit, snake venom, preferably from a viper so deadly it was called odto, high noon, because its victims could not expect to survive more than half a day."

_________________
"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 11:23 pm 
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If India has Kama Sutra and Japan has Shibari (bondage); the ancient Filipinos had Tugruk and Sakra. :mrgreen:

Those of you here who are married or who have girlfriends may have heard of things like french tickler or pilik mata ng kambing. The pre-colonial Filipinos also had something similar to spice up their romantic life. Here is an article from pinoy-culture.com

Sex

Image

The Tugruk and Sakra

by Ligaya Caballes, June 14, 2012,

The Tudruk or Tugbuk (Pen!s Pin) and Sakra (Pen!s Ring) were objects used by the early Cebuanos and other ethnic groups to add spice and excitement to their sexual lifestyle. Unfortunately, this practice of putting tudruk and sakra on male pen!ses were prohibited when the Catholic Spanish missionaries came to the island. One of the missionaries had even conducted a tedious individual pen!s inspection to get rid of these things that they called “satanic and barbaric”. The European missionaries were dumbfounded when they found out that the natives were practicing such “malevolent deeds”.

Despite their professions of piety, the early Spaniards were curious about the native’s culture and even studied the sex life of the natives. The first Europeans to record the sexual practices in the Philippines were Antonio Pigafetta and Fray Juan de Plasencia.

Pigafetta interviewed and examined couples at length. Here are some of his findings:

“Both young and old males pierce their penises with a gold or tin rod the size of a goose quill. In both ends of the same bolt, some have what resembles a spur, with points upon the ends; others are like the head of a cart nail. I very often asked many, both young and old, to see their pen!s, because I could not credit it. In the middle of the bolt is a hole, through which they urinate.

The bolt and the spurs always hold firm. They say that the women wish it so, and if they did otherwise they would not have communication with them.

When a man wishes to have intercourse with a woman, she takes his pen!s not in the normal way, but gently introduces first the top spur and then the bottom one into her vag!na. Once inside, the pen!s becomes erect and cannot be withdrawn until it is limp.”

Pigafetta asserted that the women hated this mode of fornication, which lacerated their organs. “they very much preferred our men to their own,” he noted with the hint of a boast. (bloggers thoughts: Wtf.)

He was wrong. Later, Spaniards found the painful posture to be the rage, especially in the Visayas. Juan de Medina, an Agustinian friar, wrote that women there would copulate only that way and were “grief stricken” when Catholic missionaries compelled them to reform as the European missionaries were scandalized and described the women natives as “sex crazed and lack proper civilization”.

This form of sexual pleasure has also been found on other parts of Southeast Asia such as Borneo.

_________________
"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 12:20 am 
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The Balangay

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Massive balangay 'mother boat' unearthed in Butuan

The largest sailing vessel of its kind yet discovered is being unearthed in Butuan City in Mindanao, and it promises to rewrite Philippine maritime history as we know it.

Estimated to be around 800 years old, the plank vessel may be centuries older than the ships used by European explorers in the 16th century when they first came upon the archipelago later named after a Spanish king, Las Islas Felipenas.

The find also underscores theories that the Philippines, and Butuan in particular, was a major center for cultural, religious, and commercial relations in Southeast Asia.

National Museum archeologist Dr. Mary Jane Louise A. Bolunia, who leads the research team at the site, says almost everything about the newly-discovered "balangay" is massive.

She holds up her hand and curls her fingers into a circle, as if grasping a soda can. "That's just one of the treenails used in its construction," Bolunia says.

An aptly descriptive term, a "treenail" is a wooden peg or dowel used in place of iron nails in boatbuilding.

So with "nails" that size, exactly how big is this boat?

Bolunia produces a piece of onionskin paper with a carefully-inked map of the archeological site. On the upper corner is a roughly pea pod-shaped boat wreck, about 15 meters long, one of eight similarly-sized balangays discovered at the site since the 1970's.

But right next to it, discovered only in 2012, are what seem to be the remains of a ninth balangay so wide that it could easily fit the smaller craft into itself twice over – and that's just the part that's been excavated so far.

Although the boat has yet to be fully excavated, it's estimated to be at least 25 meters long.

Aside from the treenails, the individual planks alone are each as broad as a man's chest – roughly twice the width of those used in other balangays on the site. The planks are so large that they can no longer be duplicated, because there are no more trees today big enough to make boards that size, according to Bolunia.

Visiting the site

GMA News visited the site on August 14, and found the excavation site waterlogged pending further digging and study. However, Bolunia assured that keeping the artifacts in this condition for now is actually beneficial for their conservation.

"We just let the water seep in and leave it at that because it's more protected than if you dry it. If you expose it without proper conservation then it will disintegrate," she told GMA News.

Jorge Absite, officer-in-charge of the Butuan Museum, is hopeful that the new discovery will yield more insights about our Filipino ancestors.

The Butuan Museum is tasked with supervising the care and protection of the balangay excavations and any artifacts found therein.

"Ito ang kasagutan sa 'missing link' ng kultura natin, kung ano ba talaga ang uri ng pamumuhay meron ang mga ninuno natin (This is the answer to a 'missing link' in our culture, on what kind of life our ancestors really had)," Absite said.

"(Filipinos') ability to construct or build big boats is not something new... Even before the Chinese came to the Philippines, the Filipinos went to China through the Butuanons," Bolunia underscored.

Proceeding with caution

Historians, and Bolunia herself, caution that much work still needs to be done before the boat can be conclusively dated and identified.

"(The newly-discovered boat) will need more technical verification to establish its connection and relationship with the other boats already excavated, so that we can know its date, boat typology, and technology," said Dr. Maria Bernadette L. Abrera, professor and chairperson of the Department of History at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, in an email interview.

"We have to be careful," said Ramon Villegas, a scholar who has done extensive research on pre-colonial Philippine history. "There has not been enough time to study (the artifacts). It could be a Spanish boat or Chinese junk."

Aside from carbon dating to determine the age of the wood, the construction techniques used and even the type of wood itself need to be ascertained before anyone can come to a definitive conclusion.

"Everything depends on the construction, on how the boat was built, before you can properly call it a 'balangay'," explains archeologist and anthropologist Dr. Jesus Peralta. He said he has yet to see the newfound boat for himself.

Nevertheless, the boat's proximity to previous sites of buried balangays promises to send ripples through the academic world.

"It's a 'mother boat'," Bolunia says with little hesitation, "and it's changing the way we think about ancient Filipino seafarers."

Rewriting Philippine history

It has long been established that Filipinos traveled across Southeast Asia as early as the 10th century, reaching as far as Champa – what is now the eastern coast of Vietnam – in groups of balangays.

These groups or flotillas have always been thought to consist of similarly-sized small vessels, an idea perpetuated by the term "barangay" – the smallest administrative division of the present-day Philippine government.

But, according to Bolunia, this new discovery suggests that these may just have been support vessels for a much larger main boat, where trade goods and other supplies were likely to have been held for safekeeping.

The discovery also suggests that seafaring Filipinos were much more organized and centralized than previously thought.

Butuan as a major center of culture and trade

"This balangay reinforces the findings of the earlier excavations about the role of Butuan as a commercial and population center in precolonial Philippines," Abrera told GMA News.

"Butuan seaport had long-time trade links with Champa and Guandong (China). You can retrace the importance of (the newly-discovered boat) by utilizing it as an archeological key to that period when Butuan was a busy link to the pan-Asian cultural and commercial intercourse," historian Arnold M. Azurin told GMA News via Facebook chat.

In fact, Filipino seafarers from Butuan were already exploring Asia over a thousand years ago, well ahead of our Chinese neighbors: as early as 1001, the Song Dynasty recorded the arrival of a diplomatic mission from the "Kingdom of Butuan."

"In 1003 AD, a Butuan chieftain petitioned the Chinese Imperial Court to allow it to bring its products direct to Guandong—instead of using Champa as the entrepôt (main trading post)," Azurin added.

However, according to Azurin, the petition was declined because the Court insisted on regulating trade via Champa.

He also says that Butuan may also have played a major role in the spread of culture and religion in the Philippines long before Christianity and even Islam came to the islands.

"The boat's possible deeper significance is that it may be one of the carriers of Hindu-Buddhist cultural influence in the Philippine Archipelago long before Islam and Christianity arrived here. Many scholars also say that the baybayin script arrived here through the same connection with Champa. Hence, you can deepen the cultural legacy of our ancestors," Azurin said.

Older than Magellan and Jung He

While the newfound boat has yet to be accurately dated, its construction and position directly alongside a balangay from the 1200's strongly suggest that it is also a balangay from the same time period.

If so, then the boat predates by hundreds of years Magellan's arrival, and death, in the Philippines in 1521 and even the Chinese explorer Zheng He's expedition across Asia in 1400.

"For more than a thousand years, the trade and settlement patterns and routes across Asia connected certain islands (of the Philippines), especially those with good harbors and steady supply of local products," Azurin said.

"Highly interesting is the mention of slaves-for-sale in (Magellan's chronicler) Pigafetta's account of the first circumnaviation: Raja Humabon boasted to Magellan that some boatloads of slaves had just left Cebu for Cambodia and Champa—likely in need of warm bodies for their wars of succession, or for new stonecutters for their megalithic shrines," he added.

Could Filipino craftsmen, sent abroad on balangays, have helped build ancient Asian monuments like Angkor Wat?

"That's a possible conjecture, considering that archeologists like Robert Fox, H. Otley Beyer and others have pointed out that some islands in southern Philippines had communities linked to (these places)," he said.

Continuing a seaworthy tradition

In any case, the "mother boat" and the smaller balangays in Butuan were definitely made for exploring the high seas, according to Dr. Bolunia.

She says their overall shape and construction are suited to navigating deep ocean waters more than shallow rivers. The presence of a quarter rudder and sails would also indicate a sea-going vessel, although these have yet to be found, Dr. Bolunia says.

"That's especially true for a boat this size," she says of the giant balangay.

Even today, the Sama-Badjao of Sulu still practice boatbuilding techniques that are strikingly similar to those used in constructing the Butuan boats.

In 2010, replica balangays built by Sama-Badjao craftsmen and manned by Filipino adventurers completed a 14,000-km journey across Southeast Asia, proving the seaworthiness of the original balangays and the traditional woodcraft used to construct them.

One of the boats, the 15-meter-long "Diwata ng Lahi," is now on permanent display outside the National Museum in Manila.

Textual evidence of large boats

Villegas believes it was only a matter of time before a boat of this size was found, pointing out the historical accounts about similarly grand Filipino vessels.

For example, Pigafetta also documented the existence of a boat fit for a king: "We saw come two long boats, which they call Ballanghai, full of men. In the largest of them was their king sitting under an awning of mats," he wrote.

Native boats "intended for cargo capacity or seagoing raids" could be "as long as 25 meters," said noted historian Dr. William Henry Scott in his book, "Barangay: Sixteenth-Century Philippine Culture and Society".

Scott also hinted at the existence of even more impressive vessels: "The most celebrated Visayan vessel was the warship called karakoa, (which) could mount forty (meter-long oars) on a side."

"The care and technique with which (Filipinos) build them makes their ships sail like birds, while ours are like lead in comparison," Scott quoted a Spanish priest as having written in 1667.

However, no large Filipino vessels have been discovered and excavated – until now, if the Butuan "mother boat" is indeed of ancient origins.

"Historians have always known there were other (large) boats. We should expect to find big boats because (we know) they existed," Villegas said.

"It's just that the National Museum only now has the funds to do the excavations. There's a lot to be found even just in Butuan," he added.

Lingering mysteries of Butuan

Dr. Bolunia and her team plan to return to Butuan in September to complete the excavation, and hopefully to date the massive new find.

They also plan to take a core sample from the ground in the hopes of answering one of the biggest mysteries surrounding the Butuan balangays.

Dr. Bolunia explains that the archeological site, although now inland, was once an alcove that opened out to the sea. She says that all the balangays were found "drydocked" on what was once the Butuan seashore.

That the vessels were so well preserved is largely because they were buried intact, and the submergence of the area over succeeding centuries kept the wood from decaying.

But exactly how did the Butuan balangays get buried there in the first place?

Dr. Bolunia says there are two competing theories: either the boats were intentionally buried, or they were left behind after a sudden cataclysm – such as a landslide from an earthquake.

If the boats were purposely abandoned, why did the builders take the trouble of burying them? But, on the other hand, where is the evidence of any natural calamity that might have befallen the boats and their builders?

These are among the many remaining questions that face probers of the Philippines' ancient past. If Dr. Bolunia's hunches are correct about the latest find in Butuan, the mother boat could be the key to unlocking answers about how our Filipino ancestors lived, explored, and fought. — with Howie Severino/ELR, GMA News

Link: http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/321334/scitech/science/massive-balangay-mother-boat-unearthed-in-butuan

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 12:49 am 
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Weapons used by our warrior ancestors. From the Macau Museum of Art, History of steel in Eastern Asia exhibit, Philippine section. Lent to them by private collectors of ethnographic arms and armor, antiques.

Weaponry

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Kris swords

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Panabas (l) and Barung (r)

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Kampilan and Bankung (far left, center)

Note: Kampilans of the past were decorated with human hair.

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Talibong (l), Gunong (c), Pira (r)

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Bagobo & T'boli swords (l), Igorot head axe (r)

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Mandaya weapons

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Tenegre (l), Sansibar (r)

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Katipunan bolo

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Igorot bolo and shield

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 1:08 am 
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Marami pang hindi naisali dyan, wala pa dyan yung mga spear and arrow heads, rattan shields, animal hide armor, etc.

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 1:50 am 
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For those of you who don't have a mental picture of what the people back then looked like...

Napanood nyo yung history-serye ng GMA 7, Amaya? Yun

That is the 'generic' look, just to give people here an idea.



Okay yung palabas na yan, kasi ni-research talaga nila yan, yan mismo ang mga nakalagay sa historical documents about the pre-colonial Filipinos, what they looked like, or at least some of us. Books like the boxer codex, travel logs of Pigafeta, etc.

Actually mahirap magbigay ng 'exact' look ng pre-colonial Filipinos, kasi bawat ethnic group ay may ibat-ibang istilo ng pananamit.

Pero yan ay pwede nang matawag na "generic" look, ng sinaunang tao noon.

take note of the red bandana worn by the characters in the show.

also take note of the amount of gold they are wearing, that is exactly the amount of gold they had on them back then. Based on archeological finds.

From the book The Philippine Islands, 1493–1898, Volume XXI, 1624, by Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson, it reads...

"The nobility of those Indians was personal. It consisted in one’s own deeds, without reference to those of others. Accordingly, he who was more valiant and killed most men in war was the more noble. The sign of that nobility consisted in wearing the cloth wrapped about the head (of which we have spoken above), of a more or less red color. Those nobles were exempt from rowing in the public fleets (and that although they were slaves), and ate with their masters at the table when they were at sea—a privilege which they gained by their exploits. In that custom of killing they reared their children and taught them from an early age, so that beginning early to kill men, they might become proud and wear the red cloth, the insignia of their nobility.”

Image

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 4:46 am 
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The gold of our ancestors

From the Philippine gold: treasure of forgotten kingdoms exhibit, Asian Society Museum in NYC. Loaned to them by the Ayala Museum in Makati.

Must watch: :cry:



Some of the pieces in the exhibit: Dated 10th-13th century

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Notice the bangle is surrounded with semi-precious stones (top left), sash/belt (bottom left), earrings (bottom right), bandana ornament (top right).

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Golden death mask. This is just one of many in the exhibit.

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A golden sash/cord. If I remember correctly, this thing weighs four (4) kilos.

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Earrings with beautiful design.

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Bolinao skull with teeth ornamented in gold. (not included in the Surigao treasure)

Image
Ancient Filipinos as illustrated in the boxer codex. Can you spot their golden accessories/jewelry similar to those in the exhibit?

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 5:33 am 
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Ganyan tayo kayaman noon na kahit mga alipin nakasuot ng ginto, Pati patay pinababaunan ng ginto!

“These natives bury their dead in certain wooden coffins, in their own houses. They bury with the dead gold, cloth, and other valuable objects. Saying that if they depart rich they will be well received in the other world, but coldly if they go poor.” – Miguel de Loarca, 1582

Saka ang ginto noon pinapamana sa next generations, hindi kasi greedy ang mga ninuno natin.

“They would rather keep it below the ground than in cash boxes because since they have wars, they can steal it in the house but not in the ground.” – Juan Martinez, 1567

Parte lang ng daily attire nila ang pagsusuot ng ginto.

"I do remember that once when I was solemnizing a marriage of a Bisayan principala, she was so weighed down with jewelry that it caused her to stoop, to me it was close to an arroba or so (1 arroba = 25 lbs.), which was a lot of weight for a girl of twelve. Then again, I also heard it said that her grandfather had a jar full of gold which alone weighed five or six arrobas. Even this much is little in comparison to what they actually had in ancient times.” – Francisco Ignacio Alcina, 1668

Mga artisan ang mga sinaunang Pilipino. Sa husay nila sa paggawa sa ginto namamangha ang mga kastila.

"They mix it (gold) with copper so skillfully they will deceive the best artisans of Spain.” – Hernando Riquel, 1573

“Nothing in the Indonesian repertoire or in the empires of Angkor (Cambodia) or Bagan (Myanmar), compare with these. It is unlikely that any ornament of the ancient world is comparable to the sheer scale of the goldsmiths’ ambitions or in the sense of excitement that the artisans themselves surely must have felt on beholding their own creations.” – John Micsik, Southeast Asian Studies Program, National University of Singapore

Yan ang komento ng isa sa mga eksperto na kumilatis sa mga artifact/treasure na yan.

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 12:34 pm 
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Nice Jura! Ala viking pala ang ibang mga ancestors natin noon.

Sarap basahin. :D :beer:

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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 10:03 pm 
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Mang Juraments sabi mo masyado malaki ang China pero yung US malaki din naman pero nasakop parin ng British..

siguro medyu maayus narin and malalim ang civilization ng China kaya hindi sila nasakop fully..

how i wish we can go back time and see how their civilization started..

dati kasi, kung sino malakas sya and panalo.. well until now to some extend ganyan parin pero not as glaring as before..

btw, nice read..


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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 1:26 am 
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IceColdBeer wrote:
Nice Jura! Ala viking pala ang ibang mga ancestors natin noon.

Sarap basahin. :D :beer:

Always happy to be of help, lalo na if it's concerned with us Pilipinos reclaiming our identity. :wink:

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"...awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
-Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, 'To the Filipinos'
"We will rise again" - Manny Pacquiao


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