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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 7:52 am 
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By Joaquin Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated March 9, 2013 - 12:00am


MANILA, Philippines - Mexican boxing legend Marco Antonio Barrera plans to open a gym in Manila and hopes to co-promote cards featuring Mexican and Filipino fighters here and in his country as a way of creating opportunities for future world champions.

Barrera’s Filipino friend Jeff de Guzman said the Mexican spoke with Manny Pacquiao on the phone during his recent four-day visit to Cebu to witness WBO lightflyweight titlist Donnie Nietes’ defense against challenger WBO minimumweight king Moises Fuentes at the Waterfront Hotel Pacific Ballroom in Lahug last Saturday.

“Manny invited Barrera to Sarangani but Barrera couldn’t go,” said De Guzman. “Barrera arrived in Cebu on Thursday and left Sunday morning after the fight because of a commitment with Azteca TV. Barrera will be back in one or two months to sit down with prospective partners for his boxing project. He’s looking forward to doing business with Filipinos and he knows how important it is to be connected with Manny.”

Barrera intends to broker an exchange of Filipino and Mexican fighters. His stable lists at least 23 up-and-coming Mexican fighters within the age range of 21 to 25. One of his fighters is Fuentes whom his older brother Jorge manages. “Right now, Barrera has fighters ready to come over and face guys like Boom Boom Bautista and Genesis Servania,” said De Guzman. “He saw the crowd in Cebu and believes there is a market for exciting fights.”

ALA Promotions chairman Tony Aldeguer, whose son Michael manages Nietes, welcomed Barrera’s plan as an opportunity for Filipino fighters to gain global exposure. “That only goes to show how nice a people we are and I am sure he has seen a lot of Filipino talents after watching fighters like Manny, Nonito Donaire, Brian Viloria and Nietes,” said Aldeguer.

Fuentes was paid $40,000 for the fight against Nietes so bringing in top-caliber Mexican warriors isn’t prohibitive if Barrera and Filipino promoters tie up. “Barrera wants to give Filipino fighters a fair shake,” said De Guzman. “He noticed that most Filipino fighters stay only three or four days in Mexico before a fight and that’s not enough time to acclimatize to the high altitude. If he’s involved in bringing Filipino fighters to Mexico, he’ll make sure they’re in town at least 10 days before a fight. It’s not the same with Mexican fighters coming to Manila because there is no high altitude to get used to.”

Dean's Corner ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1


Barrera has a lot of respect for Filipino fighters particularly as he was twice beaten by Pacquiao. He compiled a record of 67-7, with 44 KOs, and his only loss by stoppage was to Pacquiao in 2003. Barrera battled only one other Filipino, former world champion Jesus Salud whom he halted in six in 2000. The only fighters to beat Barrera were Pacquiao twice, Junior Jones twice, Juan Manuel Marquez, Erik Morales and Amir Khan. He stopped Jose Arias in two rounds in his farewell fight in Guadalajara in February 2011. During his 22-year career, Barrera held the WBO superbantamweight title thrice, the WBC/IBO featherweight belts and the IBF/WBC superfeatherweight championships. He began his career with a 43-0 start.

Barrera, 39, didn’t raise a howl when Nietes retained his crown by a majority draw with Fuentes but expressed his disagreement with the decision to WBO Asia Pacific chairman and fight supervisor Leon Panoncillo. The Fuentes group earlier tried to strike out Filipino Danrex Tapdasan from the judges panel, citing the possibility of partisanship, but Panoncillo upheld the appointment approved by WBO president Paco Valcarcel of Puerto Rico. Panoncillo told Barrera it was a close fight and could’ve gone either way, justifying the draw. Panoncillo assured Barrera it was not a hometown decision.

Barrera reportedly told Michael Aldeguer he thought Fuentes won by at least a four round margin. The ALA Promotions president, however, said Nietes deserved to win because he scored the more telling blows and displayed superior ring generalship. Barrera said if ever there is a rematch in Manila or Cebu, he will insist on three neutral judges. Tony Aldeguer said Barrera or anyone in Fuentes’ camp has no business making demands because the appointments are made only by Valcarcel. Barrera didn’t push his protest, saying “that’s part of boxing” with a shrug of the shoulders. He wouldn’t want to jeopardize plans of partnering with Filipino promoters for future projects.

Barrera said Fuentes learned his lesson from the draw with Nietes. “Next time, Fuentes won’t leave the outcome in the hands of the judges,” said Barrera, quoted by De Guzman. “He’ll make sure he knocks out Nietes if ever there’s a rematch.” But it won’t be easy tagging Nietes who proved an elusive target most of the way in boxing Fuentes from a distance. Nietes has never been stopped in carving out a 31-1-4 record. His only setback was to Indonesia’s Angky Angkotta by split decision in Jakarta in 2004. Angkotta was the same fighter whom Servania halted in seven in the Nietes-Fuentes undercard last Saturday.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 7:56 am 
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What a nice gesture of goodwill......thanks MB.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:03 am 
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This is really good!
I hope it will push through, another job opportunities for some Filipino, and not only that, it will promote Boxing sports more in Metro Manila area, bigger chance to any out-of-school youths to try and showcase their talent in this sport.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:34 am 
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the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao :biglaugh:


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:48 am 
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el critico wrote:
the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao :biglaugh:




:lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 9:00 am 
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el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 9:55 am 
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el critico wrote:
the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao :biglaugh:




Don't feed this troll. :biglaugh:

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:18 am 
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8 in 8 wrote:
el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:37 am 
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Junorz wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:
el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.

It gives hope to people who don't have much......you want to take that away from any aspiring boxers who probably will turn out great someday ? c'mon lighten up a bit.....geeezhhhhh. :-|

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 11:20 am 
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8 in 8 wrote:

el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

Junorz responded: How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.



Hold your horses, kabayan. I believe you misunderstood my remark. Actually, I was responding sarcastically to el critico's comment that Barrera's "first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao." (See above). You wouldn't call the people you're trying to sell your product to as imbeciles? Would you? Hence my comment, Barrera as a businessman, praising the pactards would be a smart move. Don't you think so? If not, might as well call Barrera's plan as a scam.

With regard to your comment that boxing in the Philippines is a fad, I think you are underestimating the Filipinos' enthusiasm when it comes to boxing. I suggest you read up more on the history of Philippine Boxing. Filipinos have always been "crazy" about boxing even before Pacquiao and I believe will continue to do so after Pacquiao.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:05 pm 
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8 in 8 wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:

el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

Junorz responded: How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.



Hold your horses, kabayan. I believe you misunderstood my remark. Actually, I was responding sarcastically to el critico's comment that Barrera's "first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao." (See above). You wouldn't call the people you're trying to sell your product to as imbeciles? Would you? Hence my comment, Barrera as a businessman, praising the pactards would be a smart move. Don't you think so? If not, might as well call Barrera's plan as a scam.

With regard to your comment that boxing in the Philippines is a fad, I think you are underestimating the Filipinos' enthusiasm when it comes to boxing. I suggest you read up more on the history of Philippine Boxing. Filipinos have always been "crazy" about boxing even before Pacquiao and I believe will continue to do so after Pacquiao.


Kabayan, Filipinos love to watch boxing and it could be true with our history. But how many of those Filipinos go to the gym and make a serious career out of it for a long period. Forget Pacquiao, forget Elorde. Most Filipino boxers don't get that far. A lot of them will soon find out that being a boxing pro for a career cannot support a family. They will have to get married eventually and find other means of living free of bruises and constant threat of permanent injury. There are plenty of gyms in the Philippines, some had already shut down, that look and feel like a squalor. I wouldn't call Barrera's plan as scam because he ain't going to hit the jackpot here. In order to maintain a decent gym with great facilities, he has to earn more than what he spends for property maintenance and the grooming of stable boxers. Do you think it's that easy to build up a world class fighter coming off the streets and farflung provinces?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:14 pm 
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Junorz wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:

el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

Junorz responded: How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.



Hold your horses, kabayan. I believe you misunderstood my remark. Actually, I was responding sarcastically to el critico's comment that Barrera's "first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao." (See above). You wouldn't call the people you're trying to sell your product to as imbeciles? Would you? Hence my comment, Barrera as a businessman, praising the pactards would be a smart move. Don't you think so? If not, might as well call Barrera's plan as a scam.

With regard to your comment that boxing in the Philippines is a fad, I think you are underestimating the Filipinos' enthusiasm when it comes to boxing. I suggest you read up more on the history of Philippine Boxing. Filipinos have always been "crazy" about boxing even before Pacquiao and I believe will continue to do so after Pacquiao.


Kabayan, Filipinos love to watch boxing and it could be true with our history. But how many of those Filipinos go to the gym and make a serious career out of it for a long period. Forget Pacquiao, forget Elorde. Most Filipino boxers don't get that far. A lot of them will soon find out that being a boxing pro for a career cannot support a family. They will have to get married eventually and find other means of living free of bruises and constant threat of permanent injury. There are plenty of gyms in the Philippines, some had already shut down, that look and feel like a squalor. I wouldn't call Barrera's plan as scam because he ain't going to hit the jackpot here. In order to maintain a decent gym with great facilities, he has to earn more than what he spends for property maintenance and the grooming of stable boxers. Do you think it's that easy to build up a world class fighter coming off the streets and farflung provinces?


Of course, it's not that easy at all. I think Barrera knows that but it's a risk he's willing to take. Boxing is business and a risky one at that. Only time will tell whether he's right or wrong. As they say, no pain, no gain. A lot of successful businessmen took risks to get there. Let me ask you. Where did Pacquiao start as a boxer? Didn't he come from a farflung province? Didn't he sometimes have to sleep in street cardboard boxes before he hit the jackpot?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:31 pm 
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el critico wrote:
the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao :biglaugh:



Image


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:46 pm 
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Junorz wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:

el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

Junorz responded: How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.



Hold your horses, kabayan. I believe you misunderstood my remark. Actually, I was responding sarcastically to el critico's comment that Barrera's "first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao." (See above). You wouldn't call the people you're trying to sell your product to as imbeciles? Would you? Hence my comment, Barrera as a businessman, praising the pactards would be a smart move. Don't you think so? If not, might as well call Barrera's plan as a scam.

With regard to your comment that boxing in the Philippines is a fad, I think you are underestimating the Filipinos' enthusiasm when it comes to boxing. I suggest you read up more on the history of Philippine Boxing. Filipinos have always been "crazy" about boxing even before Pacquiao and I believe will continue to do so after Pacquiao.


Kabayan, Filipinos love to watch boxing and it could be true with our history. But how many of those Filipinos go to the gym and make a serious career out of it for a long period. Forget Pacquiao, forget Elorde. Most Filipino boxers don't get that far. A lot of them will soon find out that being a boxing pro for a career cannot support a family. They will have to get married eventually and find other means of living free of bruises and constant threat of permanent injury. There are plenty of gyms in the Philippines, some had already shut down, that look and feel like a squalor. I wouldn't call Barrera's plan as scam because he ain't going to hit the jackpot here. In order to maintain a decent gym with great facilities, he has to earn more than what he spends for property maintenance and the grooming of stable boxers. Do you think it's that easy to build up a world class fighter coming off the streets and farflung provinces?

8 in 8 wrote:
Of course, not easy at all. I think Barrera knows that but a risk he's willing to take. Boxing is business and a risky one at that. Only time will tell whether he's right or wrong. As they say, no pain, no gain. Let me ask you. Where did Pacquiao start as a boxer? Didn't he come from a farflung province? Wasn't he sleeping in cardboard boxes in the streets before he hit the jackpot?


Come on now. In my short trip to Philippine boxing history lane, we produced only 3 great fighters, Villa, Elorde and Pacquiao, in one century, 3 to 4 decades apart. Let's pray Donaire takes the mantle from Pacquiao within a decade, from one Filipino great to another. If Barrera thinks he can produce another Pacquiao with his gym, you, two, must be watching American Idol too much.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:59 pm 
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Junorz wrote:
Junorz wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:
8 in 8 wrote:

el critico wrote: the first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao

What a smart move by a former boxer now a promoter/businessman.

Junorz responded: How could that be a smart move? Most likely, Barrera, as promoter, is going to feed his wards who couldn't find decent jobs to keep themselves in good shape. He'd be running a shelter instead of a gym. The timing is even bad because Pacquiao's popularity is declining, so as the interest of aspiring Filipino boxers. Soccer is like a religion to Brazil, without Pele, without Ronaldo, it still thrives because the people love the game so much that it has become a big part of their lives. Boxing in the Philippines is a fad, it only grabs huge interest when there's a big star inspiring young, would-be boxers. I don't think Donaire has what it takes to be that star.



Hold your horses, kabayan. I believe you misunderstood my remark. Actually, I was responding sarcastically to el critico's comment that Barrera's "first step is to win the pactards, no wonder he praises pacquiao." (See above). You wouldn't call the people you're trying to sell your product to as imbeciles? Would you? Hence my comment, Barrera as a businessman, praising the pactards would be a smart move. Don't you think so? If not, might as well call Barrera's plan as a scam.

With regard to your comment that boxing in the Philippines is a fad, I think you are underestimating the Filipinos' enthusiasm when it comes to boxing. I suggest you read up more on the history of Philippine Boxing. Filipinos have always been "crazy" about boxing even before Pacquiao and I believe will continue to do so after Pacquiao.


Kabayan, Filipinos love to watch boxing and it could be true with our history. But how many of those Filipinos go to the gym and make a serious career out of it for a long period. Forget Pacquiao, forget Elorde. Most Filipino boxers don't get that far. A lot of them will soon find out that being a boxing pro for a career cannot support a family. They will have to get married eventually and find other means of living free of bruises and constant threat of permanent injury. There are plenty of gyms in the Philippines, some had already shut down, that look and feel like a squalor. I wouldn't call Barrera's plan as scam because he ain't going to hit the jackpot here. In order to maintain a decent gym with great facilities, he has to earn more than what he spends for property maintenance and the grooming of stable boxers. Do you think it's that easy to build up a world class fighter coming off the streets and farflung provinces?

8 in 8 wrote:
Of course, not easy at all. I think Barrera knows that but a risk he's willing to take. Boxing is business and a risky one at that. Only time will tell whether he's right or wrong. As they say, no pain, no gain. Let me ask you. Where did Pacquiao start as a boxer? Didn't he come from a farflung province? Wasn't he sleeping in cardboard boxes in the streets before he hit the jackpot?


Come on now. In my short trip to Philippine boxing history lane, we produced only 3 great fighters, Villa, Elorde and Pacquiao, in one century, 3 to 4 decades apart. Let's pray Donaire takes the mantle from Pacquiao within a decade, from one Filipino great to another. If Barrera thinks he can produce another Pacquiao with his gym, you, two, must be watching American Idol too much.


You didn't answer my question which was mainly a follow up to your own statement. Didn't Pacquiao come from a farflung province? Wasn't he sleeping in cardboard boxes in the streets before he hit the jackpot? Your answer of "Come on now" is cop out. You didn't want to answer it because you know it contradicts your statement.

As to your statement, "If Barrera thinks he can produce another Pacquiao with his gym, you, two must be watching American Idol too much." To reiterate, that's a risk Barrera is willing to take. BTW, what's American Idol got to do with the price of rice. I think you have completely digressed from the point and now being illogical. I will let you have the last word.


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