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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 10:05 pm 
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Hidilyn F. Diaz (born February 20, 1991[1]) is a Filipino weightlifter and airwoman. At the 2016 Summer Olympics, Diaz competed at the women's 53-kg weight division and won the silver medal, ending the Philippines' 20-year Olympic medal drought.

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Diaz competed at the women's 53kg weightlifting category with the intention of at least winning a bronze medal. Diaz surpassed her own personal target and won the silver medal at the event, after successfully clinching a lift of 88 kg in her second attempt in snatch event (placed 6th) and 111 kg and 112 kg in the first and second attempts in the clean and jerk event (placed 2nd). This was the first medal for the Philippines in the Summer Olympics after 20 years. This was also the first non-boxing medal for the nation since 1936. Aside from being the first Filipina weightlifter to compete in three consecutive Olympics, she also became the first women and first Mindanaoan to win an Olympic medal.

On August 8, 2016, she returned to her homeland Zamboanga City and was welcomed as an Hero of the City, She also received numerous incentives from Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte, Philippine Sports Commission and her local city.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidilyn_Diaz

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He has told you what he requires of you.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 3:14 pm 
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Dr. Isagani S. Leal

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Perseverance personified
By Stella A. Estremera
Saturday, April 13, 2013


DURING the graduation ceremony at the PICC in Manila of the Manila Central University-Filemon D. Tanchoco Medical Foundation (MCU-FDTMF) College of Medicine on April 18, 1994, Gemeniano F. Leal, a jeepney driver from a remote barangay of Magpet in Cotabato Province, was the graduation speaker.

How an aging jeepney driver became a graduation speaker of soon-to-be doctors of medicine is the story of perseverance that spanned years and distances of the jeepney driver’s son, Dr. Isagani S. Leal.

“Maraming umiyak noon dahil sa binibigkas ng father ko, yung ang mga gabi ay pilit ginawang araw para lang matustusan ang aking pag-aaral,” Dr. Leal said.

Dr. Leal is Asia’s only musculoskeletal expert who had to be a waiter and dish washer in Tropical Hut while in pre-med in between washing cars for a fee, a room boy of Anito Hotel while in Medical School, and being his own delivery boy in a small business he ran while already a practicing doctor in Cotabato City.

Dr. Leal today is the resident sports doctor of all the teams of multibillionaire Manny V. Pangilinan -- the Team Azkals and Talk and Text included, who specializes in non-invasive treatment of sports injuries. Meaning, he’ll heal you without cutting you up.

His most common patients in this specialized field, however, are old people suffering from arthritis and rheumatism.

Before becoming what he is today, he made a name of sorts as the doctor of poor overseas Filipino workers in Israel during the four years of his residency training for musculoskeletal medicine between 2004-2008 in Tel Aviv.

He’s now a regular visiting specialist of Alexian Brothers Health and Wellness Center in Matina, Davao City starting this year, and his initial once-a-month visit is now extended to twice a month because of the bulk of patients that he gets.

“Yung unang clinic ko dito noong February, hanggang 10 o’clock kami ng gabi,” he said.

He hails from Barangay Pangao-an in Magpet where his mother, Julieta Leal, was the pioneering public school teacher.

“We had to walk seven kilometers to school every day,” he said during an interview in the clinic he shares with fellow doctor and City Councilor Rene Elias Lopez at the Alexian Brothers last week.

From that remote barangay, he finished high school at the Notre Dame in Magpet where the brothers noticed his unusual intelligence and thus invited him to become a seminarian.

He did become one, except that in his years as a seminarian he noticed that his grades in Theology and Philosophy were among the lowest, while his grades in the sciences were extremely high.

He decided to take up BS Psychology at the Far Eastern University (FEU) because of this, just to test the waters and check out if indeed, the world of medicine is his calling.

Upon graduation, the family had to discuss long and hard if they can afford medical school.

He persisted and thus entered MCU after garnering a 99+ rating in the Medical College Aptitude Test (MCAT).

Medical School was a test of his and his family’s mettle and determination. There wasn’t enough money to feed the family, much less pay for tuition.

“Yung pinakabata kong sister umiiyak na ‘yun kasi hanggang kelan ba raw an asin yung ginagamit naming pang-toothpaste. Sabi naman ng nanay, konting tiis lang at matatapos rin ang iyong manong,” he said.

Thus he worked as a room boy in Anito Hotel.

It took him two years to finish first year medicine because of this.

For his second year, his mother retired as a public school teacher and so he had enough to pay full tuition from her retirement pay.

But that was all it can pay.

The third year, he had to earn his allowance to cover board and lodging and school needs again while his father saves up for his tuition, thus it again took him two years again to hurdle.

On the fourth year, his father was supposed to have saved enough for his tuition, except that a fellow worker in the motel urged him to invest the money with the business of the fellow worker’s wife in Baclaran; to add a little more in the savings he had.


The woman swindled him, and never returned his money. While it seemed like it was the end of his dream, he decided not to force the woman to pay up.

“Wala rin namang mapapambayad yun,” he said.

With no money to pay his tuition, he asked their school registrar to allow him to enroll while he still has to earn his tuition as he explained what happened to his tuition money. He had news clippings from tabloid newspapers that told his story and he showed this to the registrar. The registrar called the dean but did not give any assurance about his request.

“After two days, pinatawag ako sa Dean’s Office. Akala ko, hindi na talaga ako makakapagpatuloy.”

But it was good news he got. Dean Lutgarda V.C. Quito told him she was able to contact some MCU alumni in Missouri, USA, who committed to shoulder his tuition fee plus a P500/month allowance.

“Pinagkasya ko yun; ang kinakain ko sarsa, rice, gulay lang, ibubuhos mo lang yung sarsa sa kanin,” he said.

But that’s not the end of it.

In fourth year, you have to be an intern, and that will require more money, which he does not have and cannot earn while working as an intern.

Checking out the possible hospitals he can serve, he learned that Chinese General Hospital is the only hospital that offers free board and lodging plus allowance to interns.

Thus, instead of writing down three hospitals of choice to work as an intern, as required in their applications, he only wrote one: Chinese General Hospital.

During interview, he was asked why; he said it was the only one that he can afford to go.

His academic record was scrutinized and was found wanting.

“Sinabi ko na kung nabigyan lang ako ng equal opportunity tulad ng mga classmates ko na full-time students, mas maganda naman siguro ang grades ko,” he said, and went on to explain that he had to work for his keep.

Like a door closing on him, the administrator said they only accept interns who speak Chinese because most of their patients are Chinese. Not discouraged, he asked to be given one month to learn.

He learned and returned to the hospital, pushing to be accepted once again.

“Sabi ko, ito lang ang pwede kong pasukan dahil may free board and lodging at allowance kaya’t sa ayaw niyo’t sa gusto, dito talaga ako papasok.” After internship and graduation, the board.

Before the exams, he was praying to hard, asking the Lord for help as he cannot see himself working and saving again for another board.

He passed with an unimpressive grade of 75 percent.

“At least, one click lang, hindi na kailangang ulitin,” he said.

With his license, he went to Cotabato City to practice, that was where he met his wife.

Segue.

While waiting for him to attend to all his patients at the Alexian, this writer was seated in front of two women patients waiting for their turn who were speaking in grammatically correct Tagalog but had this accent that was definitely not from Luzon.

Thus, during the course of the interview, I couldn't help but ask where those women were from.

“Yan ang Tagalog ng Cotabato,” he said. One of the women is the daughter of his “ninang sa kasal.”

While running a small clinic in Cotabato, he said, he also set up a business selling consumer goods, which he delivers himself.

One of his regular customers was this lady, who at one time noticed that the receipt he handed over had “Isagani S. Real” as proprietor of “ISLeal Merchandise.”

“Kaano-ano mo si Doctor Leal,” the lady asked.

When told that he is that Doctor Leal, the lady was shocked because he was more like a kargador than a doctor and businessman and that flustered the lady for treating him like the kargador that he looked like.

They’ve been friends since then, and she became his “ninang” when he got married.

In 2004, he had the chance to apply for a scholarship in Israel for a specialization. Of the 16 who applied, only two of them passed.

It was the only available specialization course where he did not have to spend anything, he said. But it meant weathering the unpredictable peace and order condition in that small country, that was more often at war than in peace, and being fluent in Hebrew. Like learning Chinese as an intern, he also learned Hebrew just to get the scholarship.

In his four years in Israel, he was writing a column for a Filipino-Iraeli magazine as his job in between earning his specialization. Through this column, he got to know of the medical problems of OFWs, the most challenging of which were OFWs who had no working visas.

“Marami silang ganun doon,” he said.

He went around on home visits doing consultations, ultrasound, and treatment of OFWs.

“Naisip ko kasi, itong mga taong ito pag lumabas ito at nakita ng authorities, madedeport sila, mawawalan ng trabaho, at merong isang pamilyang mawawalan ng pangkabuhayan, mga batang hindi na makakaeskwela,” he said. “Wala ring ibang malalapitan ang mga taong ito.”

In between school, he went “from north to south” of Israel to treat.

Life wasn’t good to him at home. He lost his wife to leukemia while he was in Israel leaving a void within; here he was, a doctor saving lives and yet he cannot save his wife.

He returned after his scholarship to a daughter, who did not know who he was. His daughter was not even a year old when he lost his wife.

But, life has been treating him well since.

His mother died just after he became a doctor but not yet making a name for himself. His father, now 80 years old, now lives with him in Quezon City.

He owns the Center for Musculoskeletal Science-Asia on West Avenue, Quezon City, and has 18 physical therapists, one assistant doctor and three visiting doctors under his employ.

But he is not swimming in money and is not inclined to be.

The reason: He is paying a lot for his state-of-the-art equipment that can only be had from Israel, but most of all, he’s not charging much. He just bills his patient according to what it takes to cure.

He recalls how Puerto Princesa Mayor Edward Hagedorn sought him out after spending over P350,000 to fix a slip disc in a hospital in Manila and not getting any relief from it afterwards.

After just a short period for treatment, he said, Hagedorn was cured and was just billed P38,000.

Since he refused to ask more, Hagedorn just gifted him a lot in Puerto Princesa.

Despite his comparatively very low fees, student athletes still get 50 percent discount.

“Hindi ako naga-take advantage kasi it’s a gift from God. Kung mag-take advantage ako, baka kunin sa akin; pwedeng makadisgrasya ng pasyente, matanggalan ng lisensya,” he said.

This is the very reason why he is holding clinic in Alexian Brothers. He admitted that upon graduation from Israel, he intended to set up practice in Alexian and even shipped out all his equipment there, but he was prevailed upon to settle in Manila because of his specialization and thus had to ship out his equipment again.

But his heart is still with service to the poor and so he’s back, setting up clinic twice a month now to serve those who need him in Visayas and Mindanao.

“Ang Alexian merong moral and spiritual responsibility hindi lang basta profit. Feeling ko, mas belong ako dito,” he said. In his future plans is setting up his own center here to cater to the bulk of his patients from the two island groups.


http://www.sunstar.com.ph/weekend-davao ... ied-277434

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A GIFT…THAT’S WHY IT IS CALLED THE PRESENT “.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2017 10:37 am 
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Bobby Murphy

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Bobby Murphy (born July 19, 1988) is an American Internet entrepreneur. He is the co-founder of the mobile app Snapchat, which he created with Evan Spiegel and Reggie Brown while they were students at Stanford University. He is also CTO of Snap Inc.

Robert Cornelius Murphy, popularly known as Bobby Murphy, was born on July 19, 1988. Murphy's mother Rosie L. Go-Murphy is a Filipino, state government employee, also has Chinese descent and grew up in the Philippines, and emigrated from the Philippines to the United States and his father in American Richard Cornelius Murphy, Jr., works for the state of California as a government employee, of Scottish, English, and Irish descent.[3] He was raised Catholic.

When it comes to Snapchat’s parent company Snap, which filed for a $3 billion IPO last week, you’re likely more familiar with the company’s CEO Evan Spiegel than its co-founder, Bobby Murphy. But as Snap’s chief technical officer, Murphy remains no less integral to Snap’s ongoing success than its better-known chief executive is.

Born and raised in Berkeley, Calif., the 28-year-old Filipino American co-founder met Spiegel at Stanford University while studying for a degree in mathematics and computational science. Now, with Snap gearing up to go public in March, Murphy is poised to have a whopping $4 billion net worth, according to Forbes.

Here are 4 things you might not know about soon-to-be billionaire:
He makes half of what Spiegel does
According to Snap’s S-1 statement filed last week, Murphy earns $250,000 a year — just half of what Spiegel makes.

From the statement: “In October 2016, we entered into an amended and restated offer letter agreement with Robert Murphy, our co-founder and Chief Technology Officer with respect to his continuing employment with us. Mr. Murphy’s annual base salary as of December 31, 2016 was $250,000.”

Although Spiegel’s cash salary will technically be reduced to just $1 when Snap debuts on the New York Stock Exchange in March — upon which both co-founders will reportedly have a net worth of $4 billion each — it’s worth noting the huge difference in pay.

He’s the technical whiz.

Murphy, who originally met Spiegel in 2010 when both belonged to the Stanford fraternity Kappa Sigma, was brought onto Snapchat early on to code the app after another project — an online social network inspired by Google Circles — failed to catch on.

“The notion is to change the notion of what a photograph is and use it as a means of communication and just recognizing that photos and videos are extremely expressive,” Murphy attempted to explain to Stephen Colbert during a rare TV appearance in 2013 with Spiegel. “You have a camera on your smartphone always with you. Why not use that as a way to communicate with friends and family? The disappearing aspect is an effort to bring the service back to normal human communication, which is ephemeral and transient and fluid.”

It was Murphy who led Snap’s expansion on the technical side. As the app evolved to include new features such as payments, content distribution, even hardware, Murphy oversaw the smooth expansion of Snap’s back-end architecture, which included storing and crunching Snapchat data on Google Cloud.

He’s even-keeled.

If Spiegel is historically known for having somewhat of a temper, Murphy has a reputation for being even-keeled. Not only is he extremely measured in the few interviews he’s done with the media, Snapchat’s first employee, David Kravitz, told Forbes in January 2014, he can’t remember ever seeing Murphy upset.

“I’d describe him almost like a monk,” Kravitz told the publication.

He lives 11 blocks from Snapchat headquarters

In late 2013, Murphy splurged on a new $2.1 million home in Venice, Calif., just 11 blocks from Snap’s headquarters. Designed by architect Larry Scarpa and artist Randy West, Murphy’s chic abode is reportedly a two-bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom home with patios, balconies and roof deck. Not too shabby, given Murphy graduated from Stanford just under seven years ago.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/bobby-murphy-snapchat-cto-010625845.html?soc_src=social-sh&soc_trk=fb

previous:

Fil-Am techie is world's second youngest billionaire
By Lara Tan, CNN Philippines
Updated 11:49 AM PHT Thu, March 19, 2015

http://cnnphilippines.com/business/2015/03/05/bobby-murphy-second-youngest-billionaire-forbes.html

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The Lord has shown you what is good.
He has told you what he requires of you.
You must act with justice.
You must love to show mercy.
And you must be humble as you live in the sight of your God.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:09 pm 
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Flash Elorde (born Gabriel Elorde; March 25, 1935 – January 2, 1985) was a Filipinoprofessional boxer. He was born and raised in the town of Bogo, Cebu, Philippines (since a city) in 1935.

Elorde was a World Junior Lightweight Champion, he won the title in 1960. In 1963, he was inaugurated as WBC and WBA champion. He still holds the junior lightweight division record for longest title reign, and is considered as one of the greatest junior lightweight champion in history. It spanned for seven years, and in doing-so he legitimized the division. Elorde is considered as one of the best Filipino boxers of all-time along with eight-division world championManny Pacquiao and flyweight champion in the 1920s, Pancho Villa. He was much beloved in the Philippines as a sports and cultural icon, being the first Filipino international boxing champion since middleweight champion Ceferino Garcia.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:09 pm 
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:11 pm 
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Gabriel Elorde was born in the town of Bogo,Cebu. The youngest of 15 children, he came from a poor family.

Elorde finished only the 3rd grade of his elementary education and was forced to drop out due to extreme poverty. He then began to work as a bearer of bowling balls and, beside this, as a carpenter.

His love for boxing came from a friend, Lucio Laborte, a former professional boxer. Laborte taught him how to box, and Elorde quickly learned the sport and pursued his dream to become a boxer. At the time he was only 16 years old.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 6:38 pm 
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Bro boxing_the_no1_sport,

This thread is for:

Pls note:
General Sports
Please discuss here all other sports outside of boxing and basketball. Discussion should be generally in English.

Boxing & Basketball threads are a great deal here in Pacland therefore we concentrate here to others sports and/or Careers and Endeavors ... hope u understand ! :)

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Micah 6:8 (NIRV)

The Lord has shown you what is good.
He has told you what he requires of you.
You must act with justice.
You must love to show mercy.
And you must be humble as you live in the sight of your God.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 3:50 am 
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Oopppsss sorry!

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 4:02 pm 
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Location: jeddah,ksa... pb 0467 ║▌│█│║▌║││█║▌│║▌║
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Jessica Cox: Pilot born without arms on flying with her feet
Jessica Cox was born without arms as a result of a rare birth defect.
That has not stopped her from living her life to the fullest. In fact, Ms Cox has experienced and achieved more than most people do in a lifetime.
She can drive a car, fly a plane and play piano - all with her feet.
In 2012 she married Patrick, her former Taekwondo instructor (she has two black belts). They live in Tucson in the US state of Arizona.
Ms Cox, 30, travels around the world as a motivational speaker, using her own life as an example of what one can achieve if one wants it enough. This month she visits Ethiopia to help promote disability rights.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 10:23 pm 
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Simeon Toribio

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 10:25 pm 
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Simeon G. Toribio (August 6, 1905 – June 5, 1969) was a Filipino athlete, who won the bronze medal in the high jump at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, United States. He represented the Philippines in three consecutive Summer Olympics, starting in 1928.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 10:26 pm 
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According to author Jorge Afable, Toribio could have won the gold medal, if not only for the "call of nature". It was a grueling four-hour competition to jump over the bar raised at 6 feet and six inches high. Toribio, who once made the jump, failed to overcome it the second time because he was distressed by call of nature. Before this, Toribio narrowly missed the bronze in the 1928 Amsterdam Games.

Toribio, who studied at Silliman University, later became a Civil Engineer. In 1941, he was elected to the House of Representatives of the Philippines, representing the Second District of Bohol, and serving until 1953.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:27 pm 
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diehard fan wrote:
Image

Jessica Cox: Pilot born without arms on flying with her feet
Jessica Cox was born without arms as a result of a rare birth defect.
That has not stopped her from living her life to the fullest. In fact, Ms Cox has experienced and achieved more than most people do in a lifetime.
She can drive a car, fly a plane and play piano - all with her feet.
In 2012 she married Patrick, her former Taekwondo instructor (she has two black belts). They live in Tucson in the US state of Arizona.
Ms Cox, 30, travels around the world as a motivational speaker, using her own life as an example of what one can achieve if one wants it enough. This month she visits Ethiopia to help promote disability rights.

may dugong pinoy ba sya bro?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:36 pm 
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JABEZJ wrote:
Dr. Isagani S. Leal

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Perseverance personified
By Stella A. Estremera
Saturday, April 13, 2013


DURING the graduation ceremony at the PICC in Manila of the Manila Central University-Filemon D. Tanchoco Medical Foundation (MCU-FDTMF) College of Medicine on April 18, 1994, Gemeniano F. Leal, a jeepney driver from a remote barangay of Magpet in Cotabato Province, was the graduation speaker.

How an aging jeepney driver became a graduation speaker of soon-to-be doctors of medicine is the story of perseverance that spanned years and distances of the jeepney driver’s son, Dr. Isagani S. Leal.

“Maraming umiyak noon dahil sa binibigkas ng father ko, yung ang mga gabi ay pilit ginawang araw para lang matustusan ang aking pag-aaral,” Dr. Leal said.

Dr. Leal is Asia’s only musculoskeletal expert who had to be a waiter and dish washer in Tropical Hut while in pre-med in between washing cars for a fee, a room boy of Anito Hotel while in Medical School, and being his own delivery boy in a small business he ran while already a practicing doctor in Cotabato City.

Dr. Leal today is the resident sports doctor of all the teams of multibillionaire Manny V. Pangilinan -- the Team Azkals and Talk and Text included, who specializes in non-invasive treatment of sports injuries. Meaning, he’ll heal you without cutting you up.

His most common patients in this specialized field, however, are old people suffering from arthritis and rheumatism.

Before becoming what he is today, he made a name of sorts as the doctor of poor overseas Filipino workers in Israel during the four years of his residency training for musculoskeletal medicine between 2004-2008 in Tel Aviv.

He’s now a regular visiting specialist of Alexian Brothers Health and Wellness Center in Matina, Davao City starting this year, and his initial once-a-month visit is now extended to twice a month because of the bulk of patients that he gets.

“Yung unang clinic ko dito noong February, hanggang 10 o’clock kami ng gabi,” he said.

He hails from Barangay Pangao-an in Magpet where his mother, Julieta Leal, was the pioneering public school teacher.

“We had to walk seven kilometers to school every day,” he said during an interview in the clinic he shares with fellow doctor and City Councilor Rene Elias Lopez at the Alexian Brothers last week.

From that remote barangay, he finished high school at the Notre Dame in Magpet where the brothers noticed his unusual intelligence and thus invited him to become a seminarian.

He did become one, except that in his years as a seminarian he noticed that his grades in Theology and Philosophy were among the lowest, while his grades in the sciences were extremely high.

He decided to take up BS Psychology at the Far Eastern University (FEU) because of this, just to test the waters and check out if indeed, the world of medicine is his calling.

Upon graduation, the family had to discuss long and hard if they can afford medical school.

He persisted and thus entered MCU after garnering a 99+ rating in the Medical College Aptitude Test (MCAT).

Medical School was a test of his and his family’s mettle and determination. There wasn’t enough money to feed the family, much less pay for tuition.

“Yung pinakabata kong sister umiiyak na ‘yun kasi hanggang kelan ba raw an asin yung ginagamit naming pang-toothpaste. Sabi naman ng nanay, konting tiis lang at matatapos rin ang iyong manong,” he said.

Thus he worked as a room boy in Anito Hotel.

It took him two years to finish first year medicine because of this.

For his second year, his mother retired as a public school teacher and so he had enough to pay full tuition from her retirement pay.

But that was all it can pay.

The third year, he had to earn his allowance to cover board and lodging and school needs again while his father saves up for his tuition, thus it again took him two years again to hurdle.

On the fourth year, his father was supposed to have saved enough for his tuition, except that a fellow worker in the motel urged him to invest the money with the business of the fellow worker’s wife in Baclaran; to add a little more in the savings he had.


The woman swindled him, and never returned his money. While it seemed like it was the end of his dream, he decided not to force the woman to pay up.

“Wala rin namang mapapambayad yun,” he said.

With no money to pay his tuition, he asked their school registrar to allow him to enroll while he still has to earn his tuition as he explained what happened to his tuition money. He had news clippings from tabloid newspapers that told his story and he showed this to the registrar. The registrar called the dean but did not give any assurance about his request.

“After two days, pinatawag ako sa Dean’s Office. Akala ko, hindi na talaga ako makakapagpatuloy.”

But it was good news he got. Dean Lutgarda V.C. Quito told him she was able to contact some MCU alumni in Missouri, USA, who committed to shoulder his tuition fee plus a P500/month allowance.

“Pinagkasya ko yun; ang kinakain ko sarsa, rice, gulay lang, ibubuhos mo lang yung sarsa sa kanin,” he said.

But that’s not the end of it.

In fourth year, you have to be an intern, and that will require more money, which he does not have and cannot earn while working as an intern.

Checking out the possible hospitals he can serve, he learned that Chinese General Hospital is the only hospital that offers free board and lodging plus allowance to interns.

Thus, instead of writing down three hospitals of choice to work as an intern, as required in their applications, he only wrote one: Chinese General Hospital.

During interview, he was asked why; he said it was the only one that he can afford to go.

His academic record was scrutinized and was found wanting.

“Sinabi ko na kung nabigyan lang ako ng equal opportunity tulad ng mga classmates ko na full-time students, mas maganda naman siguro ang grades ko,” he said, and went on to explain that he had to work for his keep.

Like a door closing on him, the administrator said they only accept interns who speak Chinese because most of their patients are Chinese. Not discouraged, he asked to be given one month to learn.

He learned and returned to the hospital, pushing to be accepted once again.

“Sabi ko, ito lang ang pwede kong pasukan dahil may free board and lodging at allowance kaya’t sa ayaw niyo’t sa gusto, dito talaga ako papasok.” After internship and graduation, the board.

Before the exams, he was praying to hard, asking the Lord for help as he cannot see himself working and saving again for another board.

He passed with an unimpressive grade of 75 percent.

“At least, one click lang, hindi na kailangang ulitin,” he said.

With his license, he went to Cotabato City to practice, that was where he met his wife.

Segue.

While waiting for him to attend to all his patients at the Alexian, this writer was seated in front of two women patients waiting for their turn who were speaking in grammatically correct Tagalog but had this accent that was definitely not from Luzon.

Thus, during the course of the interview, I couldn't help but ask where those women were from.

“Yan ang Tagalog ng Cotabato,” he said. One of the women is the daughter of his “ninang sa kasal.”

While running a small clinic in Cotabato, he said, he also set up a business selling consumer goods, which he delivers himself.

One of his regular customers was this lady, who at one time noticed that the receipt he handed over had “Isagani S. Real” as proprietor of “ISLeal Merchandise.”

“Kaano-ano mo si Doctor Leal,” the lady asked.

When told that he is that Doctor Leal, the lady was shocked because he was more like a kargador than a doctor and businessman and that flustered the lady for treating him like the kargador that he looked like.

They’ve been friends since then, and she became his “ninang” when he got married.

In 2004, he had the chance to apply for a scholarship in Israel for a specialization. Of the 16 who applied, only two of them passed.

It was the only available specialization course where he did not have to spend anything, he said. But it meant weathering the unpredictable peace and order condition in that small country, that was more often at war than in peace, and being fluent in Hebrew. Like learning Chinese as an intern, he also learned Hebrew just to get the scholarship.

In his four years in Israel, he was writing a column for a Filipino-Iraeli magazine as his job in between earning his specialization. Through this column, he got to know of the medical problems of OFWs, the most challenging of which were OFWs who had no working visas.

“Marami silang ganun doon,” he said.

He went around on home visits doing consultations, ultrasound, and treatment of OFWs.

“Naisip ko kasi, itong mga taong ito pag lumabas ito at nakita ng authorities, madedeport sila, mawawalan ng trabaho, at merong isang pamilyang mawawalan ng pangkabuhayan, mga batang hindi na makakaeskwela,” he said. “Wala ring ibang malalapitan ang mga taong ito.”

In between school, he went “from north to south” of Israel to treat.

Life wasn’t good to him at home. He lost his wife to leukemia while he was in Israel leaving a void within; here he was, a doctor saving lives and yet he cannot save his wife.

He returned after his scholarship to a daughter, who did not know who he was. His daughter was not even a year old when he lost his wife.

But, life has been treating him well since.

His mother died just after he became a doctor but not yet making a name for himself. His father, now 80 years old, now lives with him in Quezon City.

He owns the Center for Musculoskeletal Science-Asia on West Avenue, Quezon City, and has 18 physical therapists, one assistant doctor and three visiting doctors under his employ.

But he is not swimming in money and is not inclined to be.

The reason: He is paying a lot for his state-of-the-art equipment that can only be had from Israel, but most of all, he’s not charging much. He just bills his patient according to what it takes to cure.

He recalls how Puerto Princesa Mayor Edward Hagedorn sought him out after spending over P350,000 to fix a slip disc in a hospital in Manila and not getting any relief from it afterwards.

After just a short period for treatment, he said, Hagedorn was cured and was just billed P38,000.

Since he refused to ask more, Hagedorn just gifted him a lot in Puerto Princesa.

Despite his comparatively very low fees, student athletes still get 50 percent discount.

“Hindi ako naga-take advantage kasi it’s a gift from God. Kung mag-take advantage ako, baka kunin sa akin; pwedeng makadisgrasya ng pasyente, matanggalan ng lisensya,” he said.

This is the very reason why he is holding clinic in Alexian Brothers. He admitted that upon graduation from Israel, he intended to set up practice in Alexian and even shipped out all his equipment there, but he was prevailed upon to settle in Manila because of his specialization and thus had to ship out his equipment again.

But his heart is still with service to the poor and so he’s back, setting up clinic twice a month now to serve those who need him in Visayas and Mindanao.

“Ang Alexian merong moral and spiritual responsibility hindi lang basta profit. Feeling ko, mas belong ako dito,” he said. In his future plans is setting up his own center here to cater to the bulk of his patients from the two island groups.


http://www.sunstar.com.ph/weekend-davao ... ied-277434


Dr. Leal is a hero.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:47 pm 
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Miguel S. White (October 9, 1909 – August 30, 1942)[1] was a Filipino track and field athlete of Filipino-American descent who competed for the Philippines in the 400 metre hurdles at the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin,Germany, winning a bronze medal in the process.

White was from Legazpi, Albay. He was killed in military action during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines.

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