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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2003 1:35 pm 
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Lightweight
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Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2003 1:33 pm
Posts: 188
Location: Iloilo City
Hey guys, can I have your comments?

-----------------------------------------------------------
raps Pinoys, claims credit for Pacquiao’s rise
By Joaquin Henson
The Philippine Star 11/06/2003
-----------------------------------------------------------

Muhammad, who used to be a bodyguard in former heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali’s entourage, recently told Ivan Goldman of World Boxing Magazine he agreed to pit Pacquiao against Marco Antonio Barrera in San Antonio on Nov. 15 because "if we win, Pacquiao will immediately come out of it as a major, major pay-per-view commodity (and) if we lose, he will get a great deal of experience–that’s what fighting’s all about, taking risks."

According to Goldman, it was Barrera who instructed Golden Boy Promotions’ Richard Schaeffer to arrange the fight against Pacquiao. Apparently, Barrera didn’t relish the sight of Pacquiao knocking out his Mexican countryman Emmanuel Lucero in Los Angeles last July. "Barrera doesn’t like to see Mexican fighters put to sleep," said Goldman.

Muhammad hinted of difficulty in talking terms with Pacquiao’s Filipino handlers and said he "is dealing with issues" involving business agent Rod Nazario and registered manager Marty Elorde. Muhammad’s connection to Pacquiao is Nazario.

"There’s another group (Elorde) over there (in the Philippines) that owns the managing contract," said Muhammad. "They’ve got their own agenda. And that agenda does not assist me much. If not for me, no one would know of Pacquiao. One reason Rod signed with me is I told him, I pull miracles."

Muhammad said he finds it ludicrous for some of Pacquiao’s Filipino advisers to even consider promoting his fights in the Philippines.

"I end up putting out forest fires," continued Muhammad who was recently accused by syndicated Talk America Radio Network host Pedro Fernandez of forging heavyweight Razor Ruddock’s signature on a 1995 fight contract. "My athlete had to stay in the Philippines because he was given cash money to do so. I had to replace that money. But I think the others involved are seeing you have to fight in the US. Otherwise, out of sight, out of mind. To try to keep him in the Philippines where he can’t make any real money is ludicrous."

Muhammad said Pacquiao is exposed to danger in the Philippines because "there are rebels and bandits who would like to abduct him or a member of his family (and) the motive could be ransom, publicity or both." He said bodyguards surround Pacquiao and his family and "Pacquiao stays in areas where he believes he’s protected."

Muhammad, head of the New Jersey promotions outfit M&M Sports, arranged Pacquiao’s first fight in the US. It was against Lehlo Ledwaba for the International Boxing Federation superbantamweight crown in Las Vegas in 2000. Pacquiao took the fight on three weeks notice after original challenger Enrique Sanchez backed out because of a training injury. "Everyone thought we were in over our heads," recalled Muhammad. "Pacquiao broke Ledwaba’s nose, dropped him with a bodyshot and knocked him out in the sixth."

San Francisco lawyer Sydney Hall brought Muhammad and Nazario together three years ago.

"There was this lawyer (Hall) running around trying to get Pacquiao anAmerican contract," related Muhammad. "He was shopping him to everyone–America Presents, Lou DiBella, Main Events, Don King. But the lawyer was about to lose him if he didn’t make the deal. The Nazarios were getting frustrated. The lawyer called me and asked if I could meet Rod at 9 or 10 in the morning in San Francisco. I said okay and they didn’t actually get around to seeing me until 6 or 7 that evening. They figured they would sign with King anyway but I changed their minds. I explained that I make miracles."

Muhammad said Pacquiao is becoming more proficient in English. "We all agree he should learn English," he added. "He’s a good-looking kid. He has a very nice personality and he can fight. If he can speak English, his value escalates. Maybe, he’ll be the first Filipino to crack the ice in commercials and endorsements."

Goldman said Pacquiao’s demolition of previously unbeaten Lucero brought him instant credibility. "Pacquiao against any of Mexico’s three mighty amigos–Barrera, Erik Morales or Juan Manuel Marquez–is a dream match for hardcore fans," mused Goldman. "But then again, virtually any fight involving Pacquiao is. He hasn’t gone the distance in more than six years. In every one of Pacquiao’s US fights, he’s made more fans, all hungry to see him again. Back home, Pacquiao is a recognized superstar. Filipinos see him as their Tiger Woods, Oscar de la Hoya and Eminem, all in one package."

Home Box Office (HBO) Sports vice president of programming Kerry Davis said the cable TV network is "delighted" to stage the Pacquiao-Barrera bout at the Alamodome on Nov. 15.

"Barrera would be a huge step up over the guys Pacquiao’s been fighting," noted Davis. "Pacquiao seems to think he’s ready. We think Pacquiao is one of the best little guys in the sport."

As to Muhammad’s claims of propping up Pacquiao, he’s entitled to crow all he wants. Last year, he signed Pacquiao to a $2.5 Million, eight-fight, 2 1/2 year offer sheet. For as long as Muhammad brings in the money, Pacquiao or Nazario or Elorde probably couldn’t care less about his self-serving posturing.

:combo:


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 5:55 pm 
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Cruiserweight
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Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2004 11:34 pm
Posts: 2622
Location: General Aviation Area (PB-0999)
mexican destroyer wrote:
Hey guys, can I have your comments?

-----------------------------------------------------------
raps Pinoys, claims credit for Pacquiao’s rise
By Joaquin Henson
The Philippine Star 11/06/2003
-----------------------------------------------------------

Muhammad, who used to be a bodyguard in former heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali’s entourage, recently told Ivan Goldman of World Boxing Magazine he agreed to pit Pacquiao against Marco Antonio Barrera in San Antonio on Nov. 15 because "if we win, Pacquiao will immediately come out of it as a major, major pay-per-view commodity (and) if we lose, he will get a great deal of experience–that’s what fighting’s all about, taking risks."

According to Goldman, it was Barrera who instructed Golden Boy Promotions’ Richard Schaeffer to arrange the fight against Pacquiao. Apparently, Barrera didn’t relish the sight of Pacquiao knocking out his Mexican countryman Emmanuel Lucero in Los Angeles last July. "Barrera doesn’t like to see Mexican fighters put to sleep," said Goldman.

Muhammad hinted of difficulty in talking terms with Pacquiao’s Filipino handlers and said he "is dealing with issues" involving business agent Rod Nazario and registered manager Marty Elorde. Muhammad’s connection to Pacquiao is Nazario.

"There’s another group (Elorde) over there (in the Philippines) that owns the managing contract," said Muhammad. "They’ve got their own agenda. And that agenda does not assist me much. If not for me, no one would know of Pacquiao. One reason Rod signed with me is I told him, I pull miracles."

Muhammad said he finds it ludicrous for some of Pacquiao’s Filipino advisers to even consider promoting his fights in the Philippines.

"I end up putting out forest fires," continued Muhammad who was recently accused by syndicated Talk America Radio Network host Pedro Fernandez of forging heavyweight Razor Ruddock’s signature on a 1995 fight contract. "My athlete had to stay in the Philippines because he was given cash money to do so. I had to replace that money. But I think the others involved are seeing you have to fight in the US. Otherwise, out of sight, out of mind. To try to keep him in the Philippines where he can’t make any real money is ludicrous."

Muhammad said Pacquiao is exposed to danger in the Philippines because "there are rebels and bandits who would like to abduct him or a member of his family (and) the motive could be ransom, publicity or both." He said bodyguards surround Pacquiao and his family and "Pacquiao stays in areas where he believes he’s protected."

Muhammad, head of the New Jersey promotions outfit M&M Sports, arranged Pacquiao’s first fight in the US. It was against Lehlo Ledwaba for the International Boxing Federation superbantamweight crown in Las Vegas in 2000. Pacquiao took the fight on three weeks notice after original challenger Enrique Sanchez backed out because of a training injury. "Everyone thought we were in over our heads," recalled Muhammad. "Pacquiao broke Ledwaba’s nose, dropped him with a bodyshot and knocked him out in the sixth."

San Francisco lawyer Sydney Hall brought Muhammad and Nazario together three years ago.

"There was this lawyer (Hall) running around trying to get Pacquiao anAmerican contract," related Muhammad. "He was shopping him to everyone–America Presents, Lou DiBella, Main Events, Don King. But the lawyer was about to lose him if he didn’t make the deal. The Nazarios were getting frustrated. The lawyer called me and asked if I could meet Rod at 9 or 10 in the morning in San Francisco. I said okay and they didn’t actually get around to seeing me until 6 or 7 that evening. They figured they would sign with King anyway but I changed their minds. I explained that I make miracles."

Muhammad said Pacquiao is becoming more proficient in English. "We all agree he should learn English," he added. "He’s a good-looking kid. He has a very nice personality and he can fight. If he can speak English, his value escalates. Maybe, he’ll be the first Filipino to crack the ice in commercials and endorsements."

Goldman said Pacquiao’s demolition of previously unbeaten Lucero brought him instant credibility. "Pacquiao against any of Mexico’s three mighty amigos–Barrera, Erik Morales or Juan Manuel Marquez–is a dream match for hardcore fans," mused Goldman. "But then again, virtually any fight involving Pacquiao is. He hasn’t gone the distance in more than six years. In every one of Pacquiao’s US fights, he’s made more fans, all hungry to see him again. Back home, Pacquiao is a recognized superstar. Filipinos see him as their Tiger Woods, Oscar de la Hoya and Eminem, all in one package."

Home Box Office (HBO) Sports vice president of programming Kerry Davis said the cable TV network is "delighted" to stage the Pacquiao-Barrera bout at the Alamodome on Nov. 15.

"Barrera would be a huge step up over the guys Pacquiao’s been fighting," noted Davis. "Pacquiao seems to think he’s ready. We think Pacquiao is one of the best little guys in the sport."

As to Muhammad’s claims of propping up Pacquiao, he’s entitled to crow all he wants. Last year, he signed Pacquiao to a $2.5 Million, eight-fight, 2 1/2 year offer sheet. For as long as Muhammad brings in the money, Pacquiao or Nazario or Elorde probably couldn’t care less about his self-serving posturing.

:combo:

after 4 years, this is your first comment, tae si murad muhammad...
long live digging!


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