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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:41 am 
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The greatest boxer of all time is Muhammad Ali. “Greatest” and “dominant” have somewhat different definitions for a reason. Floyd Mayweather Jr. is the most dominant boxer in history and also, because of his ability to make championship fighters look ordinary, and his perfect record in a brutal sport, the most dominant athlete of all time. Mayweather’s 50 consecutive victories with zero losses consist of 24 wins against current or former champions and 26 victories in world title fights. Half of the time, Mayweather was defeating the best in his sport and the entire world. You don’t need graphs or endless statistics to debate Mayweather’s dominance. Zero losses says it all.

Too many convoluted mathematical equations exist in today’s era of rankings and athletic debate. With Mayweather, the fact he’s faced so many legends and remained without a loss speaks volumes. From 2005 until 2012, he defeated Arturo Gatti, Zab Judah, Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton, Juan Manuel Marquez, Shane Mosley and Miguel Cotto. These are all boxing legends, and Mayweather continued his excellence even when fighting Canelo Alvarez and the great Manny Pacquiao in later years.

Like DiMaggio’s 56 game hitting streak, Mayweather achieved a mark of greatness that can’t be quantified by graphs or metrics. It’s difficult to get a hit in three consecutive baseball games, much less 56 games in a row. For this reason, Joe DiMaggio’s record might never be broken. In boxing, Ali lost to Frazier and Ken Norton numerous times, Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran both defeated one another, Mike Tyson lost to Evander Holyfield, and even the greatest champions tasted defeat.

The only undefeated record belonged to the legendary Rocky Marciano, at 49-0, and the same critique of Marciano defeating Joe Lewis has been leveled against Mayweather. Some say “Money” evaded upper echelon opponents during their prime, but this critique ignores the reality that Mayweather was a more powerful puncher earlier in his career, and had other youthful advantages had he faced De La Hoya or Pacquiao earlier in their careers. Ultimately, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is 26-0 in world title fights. Over half of his unbroken winning streak consisted of world title contests; which both highlights his athletic talent and mental toughness.

Maywewather has world titles in 5 weight divisions; one of only five boxers in history to achieve this feat. His titles span from the 130 to 154 lb. weight classes, which also correlates to the fact he was Ring Magazine Boxer of the Year in 1998 and 2007. This accomplishment also speaks volumes, since nobody has ever accused or even suspected Mayweather of taking any performance enhancing drugs. Yet, he dominated in an era where numerous boxers have been suspected of using PEDs. A perfect record, from the beginning of an athlete’s career until the end, without gaining a chemical advantage over opponents, is something phenomenal in this day and age.

As for the issue of his fighting style, I’m embarrassed to have once written this article. Although I’m a journalist focused primarily on politics, I’ve written several sports articles and if I could go back in time, I wouldn’t have written that piece. First, I don’t want to be associated with the few baseball writers who didn’t vote for Babe Ruth or Hank Aaron as first ballot Hall of Famers (imagine explaining voting against Ruth or Aaron) and personal preference should be removed from evaluating an athlete’s career achievements. For me, Mike Tyson and Marvelous Marvin Hagler are my type of fighters, Ali is the greatest, and I like Pacquiao’s fighting style more than Mayweather’s technical mastery. However, perfection can’t be evaluated alongside a thirst for blood, or a longing for the days of Joe Louis and Rocky Marciano.

Mayweather’s defensive skills have resulted in hundreds of millions of dollars, while the majority of boxers struggle to keep their earnings. After parting ways with Hall of Fame promoter Bob Arum a decade ago, Mayweather controlled his financial future and has earned $340 million over the years. In an industry known for ruining boxers financially, Mayweather was nearly perfect with money as well, promoting himself and negotiating his own contracts. In terms of dominance, this aspect of autonomy spans beyond boxing and if you don’t believe me, watch ESPN’s Broke. In addition, Mayweather’s boxing skills will allow him to live in a healthier manner during his later years, when other boxers might feel the effects of punches to the head and years of contact.

There are those who might confuse the words “greatest” with “dominant” and disregard my thoughts, in the same manner I overlooked Mayweather’s perfect career after the Pacquiao fight. There might be better boxers in the history of boxing, but nobody has had as many consecutive victories. As for my viewpoint he’s the most dominant athlete of all time, the nature of boxing and others sports must be put into perspective.

Gretzky, Jordan, and Bonds played team sports, and those teams had an impact on their greatness and success. Peter Sampras, Roger Federer, Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus and other legends in tennis and golf had courts, wind, tournaments that fit their strengths, and other factors that played into their success. Floyd Mayweather Jr., like any boxer, only had his gloves and the opponent in front of him, doing everything possible to inflict maximum damage. The psychology and nature of boxing revolve around the bare minimum in terms of external factors; two men are looking at each other with the intent to hurt one another, and nobody stops until the bell rings.

Gretzky was protected from physical contact by teammates and Michael Jordan had Scottie Pippen; every legend in baseball, football and basketball had someone around who helped them achieve greatness. Mayweather went into the ring with another man who wanted to knock his head off. There’s a chance that any boxer could lose his life in the ring, like Korean championship boxer Duk-koo Kim in his fight thirty years ago against Ray Mancini. As explained in a New York Times piece by Mark Kriegel titled A Step Back, the courageous Korean champion died as a result of a grueling match:

Upon his arrival at Desert Springs Hospital, Duk-koo was given a CT scan revealing a subdural hematoma — a blood clot — on the right side of the brain. Dr. Lonnie Hammargren, the neurosurgeon who reported to the ER, saw from the scan that most of the blood had settled in the parietal lobe. He estimated its volume to be 100cc.
“Enough to fill between three and four one-ounce shot glasses,” he says.
Later that night, Sinatra introduced Ray to the audience at the Circus Maximus Showroom.
...Two and a half hours on the operating table would not save Duk-koo Kim. Death was inevitable; the body would go the way of his brain.
People don’t die in basketball and Mayweather fought at 134 lbs, the same weight Ray Mancini and Duk-koo Kim fought at during that tragic title fight.

In terms of earnings, revenue generated in his sport, and consecutive years of greatness and dominance, there’s nobody who compares to Floyd Mayweather Jr. Factor in the reality that he could have died in any of his matches, and that half of his fights were against current or former champions (capable of literally killing a man in the ring) and his accomplishments become even greater. His five titles in different weight classes and his greatness span from the 90’s until today. As for Mayweather’s victory to surpass Marciano’s record, Conor McGregor holds multiple championships in the UFC, and as we witnessed in the fight, displayed amazing boxing skill. There’s no doubt he could defeat a number of professional boxers in the world today.

Floyd Mayweather Jr. has been able to make a brutal combat sport look easy at times. He’s defeated the best and either outsmarted them or dominated physically to remain perfect. While nobody is a perfect human being, and not everyone loves his personality, remember that as you read this, not everyone loves your personality or thinks you’re a perfect person. In terms of professional boxing and sports history, there isn’t another athlete who’s done what Mayweather Jr. has achieved. Fifty times, Mayweather entered the ring against a dangerous opponent and all fifty times, he defeated competitors who wanted nothing more than to knock him out. Combine this consecutive win streak with the fact he negotiated his own contracts and controlled his financial future, and nobody can match Mayweather Jr.’s legacy.


https://www.huffpost.com/entry/floyd-ma ... 6c803c73da


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:58 am 
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If your argument is that Floyd was undefeated in 50 fights, consider Julio Cesar Chavez's record of about 80 undefeated professional record before he suffered his first defeat... and all his fights were top notch. Floyd waited 5 years before accepting Pacman's challenge just when Pacquiao was slipping. At the height of Margarito's career when he KO'd Cotto, he (Mayweather) was offered $8M (the highest at that time) by Arum to face Margarito, but he turned it down for fear of losing his "0" loss record. He subsequently faced underweight Marquez down the line to pad up his record. I think the title of "The most dominant athlete and boxer of all time" belongs to non other than Julio Cesar Chavez, Sr., who I believe would have bamboozled Mayweather at their peaks.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 7:09 am 
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You might have a good argument in most dominant boxer but ATHLETE ???
Edwin Moses won 122 consecutive races in a span of 10 years.
Aleksandr Karelin won 887 wrestling matches and lost TWO.

Wilt Chamberlain ?
Michael Jordan ?


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 7:49 am 
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BelowTheBelt wrote:
If your argument is that Floyd was undefeated in 50 fights, consider Julio Cesar Chavez's record of about 80 undefeated professional record before he suffered his first defeat... and all his fights were top notch. Floyd waited 5 years before accepting Pacman's challenge just when Pacquiao was slipping. At the height of Margarito's career when he KO'd Cotto, he (Mayweather) was offered $8M (the highest at that time) by Arum to face Margarito, but he turned it down for fear of losing his "0" loss record. He subsequently faced underweight Marquez down the line to pad up his record. I think the title of "The most dominant athlete and boxer of all time" belongs to non other than Julio Cesar Chavez, Sr., who I believe would have bamboozled Mayweather at their peaks.


Quality Over Quantity. TBE Floyd had fought more title fights than JCC Sr. TBE Floyd had beaten more Hall of Famers than JCC Sr.

Checkmated.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:02 am 
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Jimmy Wilde had 93-0-1 streak...
Julio Cesar Chavez had 89-0-1 streak...
Willie Pep had 62-0 streak...
Jimmy Barry had 59-0-10 streak...
Ricardo Lopez had 51-0-1 streak...
Wanheng Menayothin has 52-0 record/streak and still counting...

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:20 am 
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Seven Sigma wrote:
The greatest boxer of all time is Muhammad Ali. “Greatest” and “dominant” have somewhat different definitions for a reason. Floyd Mayweather Jr. is the most dominant boxer in history and also, because of his ability to make championship fighters look ordinary, and his perfect record in a brutal sport, the most dominant athlete of all time. Mayweather’s 50 consecutive victories with zero losses consist of 24 wins against current or former champions and 26 victories in world title fights. Half of the time, Mayweather was defeating the best in his sport and the entire world. You don’t need graphs or endless statistics to debate Mayweather’s dominance. Zero losses says it all.

Too many convoluted mathematical equations exist in today’s era of rankings and athletic debate. With Mayweather, the fact he’s faced so many legends and remained without a loss speaks volumes. From 2005 until 2012, he defeated Arturo Gatti, Zab Judah, Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton, Juan Manuel Marquez, Shane Mosley and Miguel Cotto. These are all boxing legends, and Mayweather continued his excellence even when fighting Canelo Alvarez and the great Manny Pacquiao in later years.

Like DiMaggio’s 56 game hitting streak, Mayweather achieved a mark of greatness that can’t be quantified by graphs or metrics. It’s difficult to get a hit in three consecutive baseball games, much less 56 games in a row. For this reason, Joe DiMaggio’s record might never be broken. In boxing, Ali lost to Frazier and Ken Norton numerous times, Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran both defeated one another, Mike Tyson lost to Evander Holyfield, and even the greatest champions tasted defeat.

The only undefeated record belonged to the legendary Rocky Marciano, at 49-0, and the same critique of Marciano defeating Joe Lewis has been leveled against Mayweather. Some say “Money” evaded upper echelon opponents during their prime, but this critique ignores the reality that Mayweather was a more powerful puncher earlier in his career, and had other youthful advantages had he faced De La Hoya or Pacquiao earlier in their careers. Ultimately, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is 26-0 in world title fights. Over half of his unbroken winning streak consisted of world title contests; which both highlights his athletic talent and mental toughness.

Maywewather has world titles in 5 weight divisions; one of only five boxers in history to achieve this feat. His titles span from the 130 to 154 lb. weight classes, which also correlates to the fact he was Ring Magazine Boxer of the Year in 1998 and 2007. This accomplishment also speaks volumes, since nobody has ever accused or even suspected Mayweather of taking any performance enhancing drugs. Yet, he dominated in an era where numerous boxers have been suspected of using PEDs. A perfect record, from the beginning of an athlete’s career until the end, without gaining a chemical advantage over opponents, is something phenomenal in this day and age.

As for the issue of his fighting style, I’m embarrassed to have once written this article. Although I’m a journalist focused primarily on politics, I’ve written several sports articles and if I could go back in time, I wouldn’t have written that piece. First, I don’t want to be associated with the few baseball writers who didn’t vote for Babe Ruth or Hank Aaron as first ballot Hall of Famers (imagine explaining voting against Ruth or Aaron) and personal preference should be removed from evaluating an athlete’s career achievements. For me, Mike Tyson and Marvelous Marvin Hagler are my type of fighters, Ali is the greatest, and I like Pacquiao’s fighting style more than Mayweather’s technical mastery. However, perfection can’t be evaluated alongside a thirst for blood, or a longing for the days of Joe Louis and Rocky Marciano.

Mayweather’s defensive skills have resulted in hundreds of millions of dollars, while the majority of boxers struggle to keep their earnings. After parting ways with Hall of Fame promoter Bob Arum a decade ago, Mayweather controlled his financial future and has earned $340 million over the years. In an industry known for ruining boxers financially, Mayweather was nearly perfect with money as well, promoting himself and negotiating his own contracts. In terms of dominance, this aspect of autonomy spans beyond boxing and if you don’t believe me, watch ESPN’s Broke. In addition, Mayweather’s boxing skills will allow him to live in a healthier manner during his later years, when other boxers might feel the effects of punches to the head and years of contact.

There are those who might confuse the words “greatest” with “dominant” and disregard my thoughts, in the same manner I overlooked Mayweather’s perfect career after the Pacquiao fight. There might be better boxers in the history of boxing, but nobody has had as many consecutive victories. As for my viewpoint he’s the most dominant athlete of all time, the nature of boxing and others sports must be put into perspective.

Gretzky, Jordan, and Bonds played team sports, and those teams had an impact on their greatness and success. Peter Sampras, Roger Federer, Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus and other legends in tennis and golf had courts, wind, tournaments that fit their strengths, and other factors that played into their success. Floyd Mayweather Jr., like any boxer, only had his gloves and the opponent in front of him, doing everything possible to inflict maximum damage. The psychology and nature of boxing revolve around the bare minimum in terms of external factors; two men are looking at each other with the intent to hurt one another, and nobody stops until the bell rings.

Gretzky was protected from physical contact by teammates and Michael Jordan had Scottie Pippen; every legend in baseball, football and basketball had someone around who helped them achieve greatness. Mayweather went into the ring with another man who wanted to knock his head off. There’s a chance that any boxer could lose his life in the ring, like Korean championship boxer Duk-koo Kim in his fight thirty years ago against Ray Mancini. As explained in a New York Times piece by Mark Kriegel titled A Step Back, the courageous Korean champion died as a result of a grueling match:

Upon his arrival at Desert Springs Hospital, Duk-koo was given a CT scan revealing a subdural hematoma — a blood clot — on the right side of the brain. Dr. Lonnie Hammargren, the neurosurgeon who reported to the ER, saw from the scan that most of the blood had settled in the parietal lobe. He estimated its volume to be 100cc.
“Enough to fill between three and four one-ounce shot glasses,” he says.
Later that night, Sinatra introduced Ray to the audience at the Circus Maximus Showroom.
...Two and a half hours on the operating table would not save Duk-koo Kim. Death was inevitable; the body would go the way of his brain.
People don’t die in basketball and Mayweather fought at 134 lbs, the same weight Ray Mancini and Duk-koo Kim fought at during that tragic title fight.

In terms of earnings, revenue generated in his sport, and consecutive years of greatness and dominance, there’s nobody who compares to Floyd Mayweather Jr. Factor in the reality that he could have died in any of his matches, and that half of his fights were against current or former champions (capable of literally killing a man in the ring) and his accomplishments become even greater. His five titles in different weight classes and his greatness span from the 90’s until today. As for Mayweather’s victory to surpass Marciano’s record, Conor McGregor holds multiple championships in the UFC, and as we witnessed in the fight, displayed amazing boxing skill. There’s no doubt he could defeat a number of professional boxers in the world today.

Floyd Mayweather Jr. has been able to make a brutal combat sport look easy at times. He’s defeated the best and either outsmarted them or dominated physically to remain perfect. While nobody is a perfect human being, and not everyone loves his personality, remember that as you read this, not everyone loves your personality or thinks you’re a perfect person. In terms of professional boxing and sports history, there isn’t another athlete who’s done what Mayweather Jr. has achieved. Fifty times, Mayweather entered the ring against a dangerous opponent and all fifty times, he defeated competitors who wanted nothing more than to knock him out. Combine this consecutive win streak with the fact he negotiated his own contracts and controlled his financial future, and nobody can match Mayweather Jr.’s legacy.


https://www.huffpost.com/entry/floyd-ma ... 6c803c73da
Agree he is a great boxer but dominant? No. He's very smart in choosing his opponent and yes he has "0" lose but that is not really important. Dominant is not the word imo of Mayweather.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:13 am 
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Absolutely not the most dominant boxer to be BUT to be fair with AXF, I believe he's the smartest boxer business/marketing-wise... He used every resources and power he had to sell himself and to secure victories even before a fight can be finalized...

AXF is one of the few boxers out there who have the right to cherrypick opponents and he utilized it in vain by carefully selecting opponents ripe for his condition... Since becoming his own boss, he never fought a prime boxer and always had the hometown advantage but still sold PPVs... That's how smart he is... :D

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 10:49 am 
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If he indeed is the most dominant athlete then he should've faced Pac back in '10.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 12:21 pm 
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JCOOL2329 wrote:
If he indeed is the most dominant athlete then he should've faced Pac back in '10.



Uhm, me too would've been treasured that great matchup, mah friend.
Fight should've been taken earlier, at their best form, and could've been made if Manny did not refuse to Olympic-style dope testing. However, PacQ adamantly rejected it, he said he's afraid of needle, so that was a clear duck. He blew that opportunity. A lot of people feel disappointed about it.
We know who's who.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 12:37 pm 
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Seven Sigma wrote:
JCOOL2329 wrote:
If he indeed is the most dominant athlete then he should've faced Pac back in '10.



Uhm, me too would've been treasured that great matchup, mah friend.
Fight should've been taken earlier, at their best form, and could've been made if Manny did not refuse to Olympic-style dope testing. However, PacQ adamantly rejected it, he said he's afraid of needle, so that was a clear duck. He blew that opportunity. A lot of people feel disappointed about it.
We know who's who.

Pac never said anything about being afraid of needles......it got discombobulated by that pig Arum.......cuz he's the one trying not to make the fight happen since floyd wants the lion's share......Pac admitted that he felt weak when he gave blood close to the fight when he faced Morales cuz the medical record got lost so they issued blood to be drawn close to the fight and that started this whole mess.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 12:59 pm 
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thedarkdragon11 wrote:
Absolutely not the most dominant boxer to be BUT to be fair with AXF, I believe he's the smartest boxer business/marketing-wise... He used every resources and power he had to sell himself and to secure victories even before a fight can be finalized...

AXF is one of the few boxers out there who have the right to cherrypick opponents and he utilized it in vain by carefully selecting opponents ripe for his condition... Since becoming his own boss, he never fought a prime boxer and always had the hometown advantage but still sold PPVs... That's how smart he is... :D


TBE Floyd fought Caneroids Alvarez at his peak, schooled him and kicked his azz pretty badly. How about that? lol


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 1:53 pm 
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Seven Sigma wrote:
thedarkdragon11 wrote:
Absolutely not the most dominant boxer to be BUT to be fair with AXF, I believe he's the smartest boxer business/marketing-wise... He used every resources and power he had to sell himself and to secure victories even before a fight can be finalized...

AXF is one of the few boxers out there who have the right to cherrypick opponents and he utilized it in vain by carefully selecting opponents ripe for his condition... Since becoming his own boss, he never fought a prime boxer and always had the hometown advantage but still sold PPVs... That's how smart he is... :D


TBE Floyd fought Caneroids Alvarez at his peak, schooled him and kicked his azz pretty badly. How about that? lol


Only Floydiots/Flomos will say that Canelo was in his prime when AXF fought him... His prime started around when he fought Cotto and Khan when he started to shape himself to 160... He's not even at his peak/top form right now and is just starting to get there (let's see how he performs vs. Jacobs)... :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:42 am 
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I just don't understand why some paqnuts had quickly wanted to undervalue TBE Floyd's stroke of genius stunt against young bull Clenelo and considered he was outta his prime yet. That's a total BS excused or they're just plain stupid. Boxing is a young man's game. So do y'all inclined to think Clenelo Alvarez still inexperienced mofo that time and TBE Floyd wasn't old fighter at 36? Lols. Clenelo started boxing around 13 years old and turned pro at 15, he's a very powerful fighter and technically decent, he won a lot by KOs. He won number of championships and fought a lot of decent champs and couple of hof's with the likes of Cintron, Mosely, Lopez and Trout, he's 44-0 prior to Floyd's fight, which is why he's considered one of the most prolific fighters, soundly gifted and most importantly undefeated and much much younger than 36yr old Floyd. Clenelo was actually being labeled as the second hot prospect after Manny Paq to have a good chance of beating TBE Floyd. To build up the matchup, Clenelo claimed that it’s the fight of his life and that he’s giving his all to ensure he beats The Best Ever fighter in the universe, and he’s ready to make the history...But then he was just included in many fighters who've tried and failed to beat TBE Floyd. So this would be improper to not give excellent credit TBE Floyd for showing one of his greatest performances in the ring. We can't deny TBE Floyd's greatness reaches the galaxy and howls back to earth underneath the white lights on the yellow moon. He's truly the BEST


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:19 pm 
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Floyd was so dominant against Tenshin Nasukawa, that's for sure.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:30 pm 
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floyd indeed is the most dominant boxer and athlete in the history of any sport financially.
but floyd will never be in rhe top 10 of boxing greats alone when it comes to legacy and achievements.

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