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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2005 11:55 am 
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COOL Stuff BRO... we will be waiting for the next batch of GOOD information :beer:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2005 4:47 pm 
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More!!!! :D and welcome me back pareng damby!!!!

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It's not what you believe in, it's how you believe in it. - Bertrand Russell


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2005 10:17 pm 
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Kadyo wrote:
More!!!! :D and welcome me back pareng damby!!!!


Welcome back pareng Kadyo! :biglaugh:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 9:34 am 
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manila_assasin wrote:
Kadyo wrote:
More!!!! :D and welcome me back pareng damby!!!!


Welcome back pareng Kadyo! :biglaugh:

lolz!!! hahahahahahaha!!!! :biglaugh:

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It's not what you believe in, it's how you believe in it. - Bertrand Russell


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 12:56 am 
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Kadyo wrote:
More!!!! :D and welcome me back pareng damby!!!!


welcome back pareng kadyo :beer: teka, saan ka ba galing at bigla kang nawala? Na suspindi ka rin ba?


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 1:17 am 
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damby wrote:
Kadyo wrote:
More!!!! :D and welcome me back pareng damby!!!!


welcome back pareng kadyo :beer: teka, saan ka ba galing at bigla kang nawala? Na suspindi ka rin ba?


shhhh tsismis lang un :biglaugh:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 1:29 am 
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Brother Damby... Do you have more of these? I am still visiting this thread evryday to check. Please keep em coming. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 6:30 am 
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manila_assasin wrote:
Brother Damby... Do you have more of these? I am still visiting this thread evryday to check. Please keep em coming. Thanks.


yeah bro, i have tons of these. Kala ko kasi sawa na kayo...hehehe. Just wait, more to come


Last edited by damby on Sat Nov 26, 2005 11:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 4:06 pm 
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Pope John Paul II is the first non-Italian to serve as pope since Adrian VI of The Netherlands, who served from 1522-23. John Paul II was born Karol Wojtyła in Wadowice, Poland, in 1920. He has governed the Roman Catholic Church from a staunchly conservative position since he became pope in 1978, disapproving of birth control, ordination of women, and political participation and office-holding by priests.

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Pope John Paul II gazes out on the Holy Land from Mount Nebo west of Amman, Jordan, in March 2000 during the pontiff’s historic visit to Israel and Jordan. According to tradition, Hebrew prophet Moses first glimpsed the Promised Land from this site.


1978 was a year of dramatic and surprising change for the Roman Catholic Church. Pope Paul VI, who had led the Church for 15 years, died of a heart attack on August 6. Then, less than two months later, Paul's successor, John Paul I, was also stricken by a fatal heart attack—after a reign of just 34 days. When the cardinals again convened at the Vatican to choose a new pontiff, they elected the first non-Italian in 4½ centuries, Cardinal Karol Wojtyla of Poland, who took the name John Paul II. Meanwhile, Jews the world over were pleasantly surprised by the dramatic success of the Camp David summit conference, which raised hopes for peace and security for the state of Israel. Controversial issues such as the ordination of women and of homosexuals continued to concern—and divide—the world's Protestant churches.

Pope John Paul II’s quotations:

-on children, the legitimate desire to have a child cannot be interpreted as the right to have a child at any cost
-on Christianity, The two thousand years which have passed since the Birth of Christ represent an extraordinary great Jubilee; not only for Christians but indirectly for the whole of humanity, given the prominent role played by Christianity during these two millennia
-on etiquette, it is unbecoming for a cardinal to ski badly (Replying to the suggestion that it was inappropriate for him, a cardinal, to ski.)
-on history, what suffering, what dramatic events! But, also, what incredible achievements (Referring to the 20th century. New Year's Eve service, Saint Peter's Basilica)
-on men, Christ called as his Apostles only men. He did this in a totally free and sovereign way
-on nakedness, only before the eyes of God can the human body remain nude and uncovered while fully conserving its splendor and beauty
-on nuclear weapons, we thus denounce the false and dangerous program of the arms race, of the secret rivalry between peoples for military superiority.
-on science, Science can purify religion from error and superstition. Religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes.
-on war, War should belong to the tragic past, to history: it should find no place on humanity's agenda for the future.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 4:28 pm 
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John Paul II (1920-2005 ), pope (1978- 2005), the first non-Italian pope since 1523, whose energetic approach to his office, unprecedented world travel, and firm religious conservatism have enhanced the influence of the papacy in both the Roman Catholic Church and the non-Catholic world. Born Karol Wojtyła on May 18, 1920, in Wadowice, Poland, he studied poetry and drama at Jagiełłonian University. During World War II (1939-1945) he worked in a stone quarry and in a chemical factory while preparing for the priesthood. Ordained in 1946, he earned a Ph.D. degree at Rome’s Angelicum Institute and a doctorate in theology at the Catholic University of Lublin. Until he became auxiliary bishop of Kraków in 1958, he was a university chaplain and taught ethics at Kraków and Lublin. His philosophical approach, which integrated the methods and insights of phenomenology with Thomistic philosophy, owed much to 20th-century German thinker Max Scheler.

In 1964 Wojtyła became archbishop of Kraków, and in 1967, a cardinal. An active participant in the Second Vatican Council, he also represented Poland in five international bishops’ synods between 1967 and 1977. He was elected pope on October 16, 1978, succeeding John Paul I. On May 13, 1981, he was shot at close range and severely wounded in an assassination attempt as he entered Saint Peter’s Square in the Vatican, but he recovered fully.

John Paul has published poetry and, under the pseudonym Andrzej Jawien, a play, The Jeweler’s Shop (1960). His extensive ethical and theological writings include Fruitful and Responsible Love and Sign of Contradiction, both published in 1979. His first encyclical letter, Redemptor Hominis (Redeemer of Man, 1979), probes the connection between redemption by Christ and human dignity. Subsequent encyclicals have dealt with the power of mercy in human life (1980), the importance of work as a “way of sanctification” (1981), the position of the church in Eastern Europe (1985), the fallacies of Marxism, materialism, and atheism (1986), the role of the Virgin Mary as a source of Christian unity (1987), the destructive effects of superpower rivalry (1988), the need to reconcile capitalism with social justice (1991), and an argument against moral relativism (1993). John Paul’s 11th encyclical, Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Life, 1995), reiterates his opposition to abortion, birth control, in vitro fertilization, genetic engineering, and euthanasia. It also maintains that capital punishment is almost never justifiable. His 12th encyclical, Ut Unum Sint (That They May Be One, 1995), addresses the issues that continue to divide the Christian churches. These include the sacrament of the Eucharist, the role of the Virgin Mary, and the relationship between Scripture and tradition.

In the 1980s and 1990s John Paul II made numerous journeys, including visits to Africa, Asia, and the Americas; in September 1993 he traveled to the Baltic republics in what was the first papal visit to countries of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). He influenced the restoration of democracy and religious freedom throughout Eastern Europe, especially in his native Poland. Dealing forcefully with dissent within the church, he reaffirmed Roman Catholic teachings against homosexuality, abortion, and “artificial” methods of human reproduction and birth control, and in favor of priestly celibacy.

In 2000, a Holy Year in which the church reflected on its 2,000-year history, John Paul asked forgiveness for sins committed by Roman Catholics. Although he mentioned no specific errors, several cardinals acknowledged past injustice and intolerance toward non-Catholics. These acknowledgements were understood to include the Crusades and the Inquisition and inaction during the Holocaust. The apology preceded a papal pilgrimage to the Holy Land and a visit to Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial in Israel.

John Paul II has resisted secularization in the church. In redefining the responsibilities of laity, priests, and religious orders, he has rejected ordination of women and opposed direct political participation and office-holding by priests. His initial ecumenical moves have been toward the Orthodox Church and Anglicanism rather than toward European Protestantism. In 1999 John Paul traveled to Romania and met with the patriarch of the Romanian Orthodox Church; this was the first papal visit ever to a predominantly Orthodox country.

John Paul II has canonized more Roman Catholics and created more cardinals than any previous pope. In 2000 he canonized 120 Catholic martyrs in China, including European missionaries and Chinese believers, as well as an American heiress, Katharine Drexel, who became a nun and served the poor. They brought the number of saints he has created to 447. In 2001 John Paul appointed 44 new cardinals, bringing the total to 184 and increasing the proportion of cardinals from developing countries to 41 percent.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 9:07 pm 
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There's a wonderful family called Stein,
There's Gert and there's Ep and there's Ein;
Gert's poems are bunk,
Ep's statues are junk,
And no one can understand Ein.


Anonymous
Current in the United States in the 1920s, the lines refer to Gertrude Stein, Jacob Epstein, and Albert Einstein.



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Albert Einstein(1879-1955), a German-born American physicist, is considered one of the greatest and most popular scientists of all time. Three papers he published in 1905 were pivotal in the development of physics and, to a large degree, Western thought. These papers discussed the quantum nature of light, provided a description of molecular motion, and introduced the special theory of relativity. Einstein was famous for continually reexamining traditional scientific assumptions and coming to straightforward, elegant conclusions no one else had reached. He is less famous for his social involvement, although he was a staunch supporter of both pacifism and Zionism.

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“Do you realize that Einstein is a scientist who needs no laboratory, no equipment, no tools of any kind? He just sits in an empty room with a pencil and a piece of paper and his BRAIN.”------David Ben-Gurion, first prime minister of Israel

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In 1905 Albert Einstein published his first paper outlining the theory of relativity. It was ignored by most of the scientific community. In 1916 he published his second major paper on relativity, which altered mankind’s fundamental concepts of space and time. On the basis of the general theory of relativity, Einstein accounted for the previously unexplained variations in the orbital motion of the planets and predicted the bending of starlight in the vicinity of a massive body such as the sun. The confirmation of this latter phenomenon during an eclipse of the sun in 1919 became a media event, and Einstein’s fame spread worldwide.

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Dragging Space and Time
The results of two studies announced in early November 1997 provide unprecedented support for “frame-dragging,” a concept predicted by physicist Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. Frame-dragging describes how massive objects actually distort space and time around themselves as they rotate. One of the studies examined frame-dragging around black holes, an example of which is shown here in an artist's conception.


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In 1946 eight scientists formed the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists to advocate international control of nuclear energy and studies for its peaceful uses. Pictured are, left to right, front, Harold Urey, Albert Einstein, and Selig Hecht; and rear, Victor Weisskopf, Leo Szilard, Hans Bethe, Thorfin Hogness, and Philip Morse.

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Einstein: Scientist and Activist
Albert Einstein was most famous for his contributions to theoretical physics, but he was also active in social and political causes such as Zionism and political freedom. Here, some of his equations appear next to his signature on a letter addressing the threat of an atomic bomb in Nazi Germany.

During World War I he was one of a handful of German academics willing to publicly decry Germany’s involvement in the war. When Hitler came to power, Einstein immediately decided to leave Germany for the United States. He took a position at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey. While continuing his efforts on behalf of world Zionism, Einstein renounced his former pacifist stand in the face of the awesome threat to humankind posed by the Nazi regime in Germany. In 1939 Einstein collaborated with several other physicists in writing a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, pointing out the possibility of making an atomic bomb and the likelihood that the German government was embarking on such a course. The letter, which bore only Einstein’s signature, helped lend urgency to efforts in the U.S. to build the atomic bomb, but Einstein himself played no role in the work and knew nothing about it at the time. After the war, Einstein was active in the cause of international disarmament and world government. He continued his active support of Zionism but declined the offer made by leaders of the state of Israel to become president of that country. In the U.S. during the late 1940s and early ‘50s he spoke out on the need for the nation’s intellectuals to make any sacrifice necessary to preserve political freedom. Einstein died in Princeton on April 18, 1955.


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Einstein’s Equations
Mathematical relationships are expressed in symbols. Equations express the most fundamental mathematical relationship: equality. Physicist Albert Einstein produced one of the most famous equations, E = mc2, which expressed the equivalence of matter and energy. Although he later became politically active, supporting pacifism and Zionism, he claimed, “Equations are more important to me, because politics is for the present, but an equation is something for eternity.”



Einstein's Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt

Albert Einstein
Old Grove Rd.
Nassau Point
Peconic, Long Island

August 2nd, 1939

F.D. Roosevelt,
President of the United States,
White House
Washington, D.C.

Sir:

Some recent work by E.Fermi and L. Szilard, which has been communicated to me in manuscript, leads me to expect that the element uranium may be turned into a new and important source of energy in the immediate future. Certain aspects of the situation which has arisen seem to call for watchfulness and, if necessary, quick action on the part of the Administration. I believe therefore that it is my duty to bring to your attention the following facts and recommendations:

In the course of the last four months it has been made probable—through the work of Joliot in France as well as Fermi and Szilard in America—that it may become possible to set up a nuclear chain reaction in a large mass of uranium, by which vast amounts of power and large quantities of new radium-like elements would be generated. Now it appears almost certain that this could be achieved in the immediate future.

This new phenomenon would also lead to the construction of bombs, and it is conceivable—though much less certain—that extremely powerful bombs of a new type may thus be constructed. A single bomb of this type, carried by boat and exploded in a port, might very well destroy the whole port together with some of the surrounding territory. However, such bombs might very well prove to be too heavy for transportation by air.

The United States has only very poor ores of uranium in moderate quantities. There is some good ore in Canada and the former Czechoslovakia, while the most important source of uranium is Belgian Congo.

In view of this situation you may think it desirable to have some permanent contact maintained between the Administration and the group of physicists working on chain reactions in America. One possible way of achieving this might be for you to entrust with this task a person who has your confidence and who could perhaps serve in an inofficial capacity. His task might comprise the following:

a) to approach Government Departments, keep them informed of the further development, and put forward recommendations for Government action, giving particular attention to the problem of securing a supply of uranium ore for the United States;

b) to speed up the experimental work, which is at present being carried on within the limits of the budgets of University laboratories, by providing funds, if such funds be required, through his contacts with private persons who are willing to make contributions for this cause, and perhaps also by obtaining the co-operation of industrial laboratories which have the necessary equipment.

I understand that Germany has actually stopped the sale of uranium from the Czechoslovakian mines which she has taken over. That she should have taken such early action might perhaps be understood on the ground that the son of the German Under-Secretary of State, von Weizsäcker, is attached to the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut in Berlin where some of the American work on uranium is now being repeated.

Yours very truly,

Albert Einstein

Source: Library of Congress.


Last edited by damby on Wed Apr 06, 2005 10:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 11:35 am 
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more on Albert Einstein..........

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“Einstein—the greatest Jew since Jesus. I have no doubt that Einstein's name will still be remembered and revered when Lloyd George, Foch and William Hohenzollern share with Charlie Chaplin that ineluctable oblivion which awaits the uncreative mind”…… J. B. S. Haldane (1892 - 1964), British geneticist

“The genius of Einstein leads to Hiroshima.”…… Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973), Spanish painter and sculptor

Albert Einstein on the Future of the Atomic Bomb:
He is best known for his work on relativity, but he was also an outspoken political activist. After World War II, he became a strong advocate for disarmament. In one of his interviews, he discusses the dangers faced by the world following the invention of the atomic bomb.


Quick facts on Albert Einstein:
Birth: March 14, 1879
Death: April 18, 1955
Place of Birth: Ulm, Germany
Known for: proposing the theory of relativity, a physical theory of gravity, space, and time
Explaining the photoelectric effect and Brownian motion
Career: 1905 Published papers on special relativity, Brownian motion, and the photoelectric effect
1909-1911 Taught physics at the University of Zürich
1911-1912 Taught physics at the German-speaking University in Prague
1912-1914 Returned to teach at the University of Zürich
1914 Became a professor at the University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics
1916 Published a paper on general relativity, extending his earlier theory of special relativity
1919 A solar eclipse confirmed Einstein's prediction that starlight bends in the vicinity of a massive body such as the sun.
1921 Won the Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the photoelectric effect
1933 Began teaching at Princeton University
1939 Pointed out, in a letter to President Roosevelt, the possibility that an extremely powerful bomb might be constructed using atomic chain reactions in uranium, and suggested that the Germans might be working on such a bomb

Did You Know:

Einstein could not find a job in physics upon graduating from college, and became a technical assistant in the Swiss Patent Office. He worked on theoretical physics in his spare time.

Einstein did not receive a Nobel Prize for his theory of relativity.

Einstein immediately left Germany for the United States following Hitler's rise to power.

Einstein spent much of his later career searching for a unified field theory, but was unsuccessful.

Einstein declined the presidency of the state of Israel when it was offered to him in 1952 by state leaders.

The element einsteinium, discovered in 1952, was named in honor of Albert Einstein


Quotations:
-on ambition, Well-being and happiness never appeared to me as an absolute aim. I am even inclined to compare such moral aims to the ambitions of a pig.
-on belief, I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly. If something is in me which can be called religious then it is the unbounded admiration for the structure of the world so far as our science can reveal it.
-on chance, I shall never believe that God plays dice with the world. Einstein's objection to the quantum theory, in which physical events can only be known in terms of probabilities. It is sometimes quoted as "God does not play dice with the Universe."
-on conscience, never do anything against conscience, even if the state demands it.
-on desire, Desire for approval and recognition is a healthy motive but the desire to be acknowledged as better, stronger or more intelligent than a fellow being or fellow scholar easily leads to an excessively egoistic psychological adjustment, which may become injurious for the individual and for the community
-on education, 1) the point is to develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition and to guide the child over to important fields for society. Such a school demands from the teacher that he be a kind of artist in his province.
2) Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything one learned in school.
3) To me the worst thing seems to be a school principally to work with methods of fear, force, and artificial authority. Such treatment destroys the sound sentiments, the sincerity and the self-confidence of pupils and produces a subservient subject.
-on ethics, 1) a man's ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death.
2) I do not believe in immortality of the individual, and I consider ethics to be an exclusively human concern with no superhuman authority behind it.
-on evil, the real problem is in the hearts and minds of men. It is easier to denature plutonium than to denature the evil spirit of man.
-on fame, Marie Curie is, of all celebrated beings, the only one whom fame has not corrupted.
-on freedom, by academic freedom I understand the right to search for truth and to publish and teach what one holds to be true. This right implies also a duty: one must not conceal any part of what one has recognized to be true.
-on the future, I never think of the future. It comes soon enough.
-On GOD, 1) God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.
2) “God is subtle but he is not malicious”. Inscribed over the fireplace in the Mathematical Institute, Princeton. It refers to Einstein's objection to quantum theory.
3) “God not only plays dice. He also sometimes throws the dice where they cannot be seen....“Referring to Albert Einstein's objection to quantum theory, "I shall never believe that God plays dice with the world."
4) It seems hard to sneak a look at God's cards. But that he plays dice and uses "telepathic" methods (as the present quantum theory requires of him) is something that I cannot believe for a single moment
-on imagination, I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.
-on intellect, we should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality.
-on intellectuals, “Every intellectual who is called before one of the committees ought to refuse to testify, i.e., he must be prepared...for the sacrifice of his personal welfare in the interest of the cultural welfare of the country...This kind of inquisition violates the spirit of the Constitution.”…….Referring to the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee.
-on knowledge, Knowledge...resembles a statue of marble which stands in the desert and is continuously threatened with burial by the shifting sands. The hands of science must ever be at work in order that the marble column continue everlastingly to shine in the sun.
-on mathematics, 1) as far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.
2 Equations are more important to me, because politics is for the present, but an equation is something for eternity.
3) Since the mathematicians have invaded the theory of relativity, I do not understand it myself anymore.
-on media, the minority, the ruling class at present, has the schools and press, usually the Church as well, under its thumb. This enables it to organize and sway the emotions of the masses, and make its tool of them… excerpt from Einstein’s letter to Sigmund Freud
-on music, 1) Einstein said that "the most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious." Then why do so many of us try to explain the beauty of music, thus apparently depriving it of its mystery?...... Leonard Bernstein (1918 - 1990), U.S. composer, conductor, and pianist referring to Albert Einstein.
2) If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music...I get most joy in life out of music.
-on nuclear war, 1) The discovery of nuclear chain reactions need not bring about the destruction of mankind...We only must do everything in our power to safeguard against its abuse. Only a supranational organization, equipped with a sufficiently strong executive power, can protect us…...referring to the United Nations.
2) Unless Americans come to realize that they are not stronger in the world because they have the bomb but weaker because of their vulnerability to atomic attack, they are not likely to conduct their policy at Lake Success or in their relations with Russia in a spirit that furthers the arrival at an understanding…...Following its establishment in 1945 the United Nations General Assembly met temporarily in Lake Success, New York State, pending the setting up of a permanent headquarters.
-on nuclear weapon, 1) if I had known that the Germans would not succeed in constructing the atom bomb, I would never have lifted a finger.
2) Some recent work by E. Fermi and L. Szilard...leads me to expect that the element uranium may be turned into a new and important source of energy in the immediate future. Certain aspects...call for watchfulness and, if necessary, quick action on the part of the Administration……Excerpt from his letter to Pres. Franklin Roosevelt referring to Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard. Albert Einstein was expressing concern about possible Nazi development of an atomic bomb. His letter helped convince President Franklin D. Roosevelt to initiate the Manhattan Project to develop atomic weapons in the United States
-Pacifism, My pacifism is not based on any intellectual theory but on a deep antipathy to every form of cruelty and hatred….Said on the outbreak of World War I..
-patriotism, Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind.
-Physics, 1) Einstein said that if quantum mechanics is right, then the world is crazy. Well, Einstein was right. The world is crazy.
2) If you want to find out anything from the theoretical physicists about the methods they use, I advise you to stick closely to one principle: Don't listen to their words, fix your attention on their deeds.
3) It's as important an event as would be the transfer of the Vatican from Rome to the New World. The pope of Physics has moved and the United States will now become the center of the natural sciences….Paul Langevin (1872 - 1946) French physicist.Referring to Albert Einstein's departure from Berlin to Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (1933).
-prejudice, Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen.
-reality, Einstein's space is no closer to reality than Van Gogh's sky.
-research, 1) a theory can be proved by experiment; but no path leads from experiment to the birth of a theory.
2) No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
-school, the school has always been the most important means of transferring the wealth of tradition from one generation to the next. This applies today in an even higher degree...for...the family as bearer of tradition and education has become weakened.
-science, 1) Concern for man himself and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavors...Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations.
2) Concern for man himself and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavors...in order that the creations of our mind shall be a blessing and not a curse to mankind.
3) Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.
4) I find the idea quite intolerable that an electron exposed to radiation should choose of its own free will, not only its moment to jump off, but also its direction. In that case I would rather be a cobbler, or even an employee in a gaming-house, than a physicist…..Referring to quantum theory.
5) I think that only daring speculation can lead us further and not accumulation of facts.
6) If Mr. Einstein doesn't like the natural laws of the universe, let him go back to where he came from….Robert Benchley (1889 - 1945) U.S. humorist, writer, editor, and critic. 6) If only I had known, I should have become a watchmaker….Reflecting on his role in the development of the atom bomb.
7) It did not last: the Devil howling "Ho! Let Einstein be!" restored the status quo…..J. C. Squire (1884 - 1958) British writer. Answer to Pope's "Epitaph for Newton.".
8) Most of the fundamental ideas of science are essentially simple, and may, as a rule, be expressed in a language comprehensible to anyone.
9) Physical concepts are free creations of the human mind, and are not, however it may seem, uniquely determined by the external world.
10) Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing...but does not bring us any closer to the secret of the "old one." I, at any rate, am convinced that He is not playing dice….The origin of "God does not play dice with the world.”
11) Science is the attempts to make the chaotic diversity of our sense-experience correspond to a logically uniform system of thought.
12) Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
13) The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking.
14) When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity. 15) You imagine I look back on my life's work with calm satisfaction, but from nearby it looks quite different. There is not a single concept of which I am convinced it will stand firm, and I feel uncertain whether I am in general on the right track.
-scientist, If my theory of relativity is proven correct, Germany will claim me as a German and France will declare that I am a citizen of the world. Should my theory prove untrue, France will say that I am a German and Germany will declare that I am a Jew. 2) The man of science is a poor philosopher.
-taxation, the hardest thing in the world to understand is income tax.
-teacher, it is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge….Motto for the astronomy building of Junior College, Pasadena, California
-truth, Ethical axioms are found and tested not very differently from the axioms of science. Truth is what stands the test of experience.
-wonder, the fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who knows it not and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle.
-work, one should guard against preaching to young people success in the customary form as the main aim in life. The most important motive for work in school and in life is pleasure in work, pleasure in its result, and the knowledge of the value of the result to the community.


Last edited by damby on Mon May 02, 2005 10:45 am, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 11:18 am 
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Rod Stewart and Rachel Hunter 1999, the rooster-haired English rock star and soccer nut gets kicked to the curb by his towering New Zealand missus, who dragged him out of the London restaurant where Stewart had just openly flirt with another woman during their anniversary dinner. After eight years of marriage, Stewart was devastated when Hunter initiated divorce proceedings, and vowed to do anything to win her back. “If she needs time alone, I can respect that. I’m willing to go into therapy,” he told a friend. “If Rachel doesn’t come back, I’m going to fall apart.” She didn’t, and ever since, Stewart apparently been tring to find a woman who measures up to Hunter.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 11:21 am 
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Arnold Schwarzenegger 1995, at the great Californian Workout, George Bush’s chairman of the President’s Council on Physical Fitness shows Mickey Mouse hoe to keep thighs shapely. Lovely legs, among other parts, have always been a weakness of Arnold’s. “I’ve personally witnessed him grab a young assistant, swing her onto his lap and say, ‘Tell daddy what you want for Christmas,’” said an insider. When he looked certain to enter the California gubernatorial race, an army of skeletons burst from his closet to object. Among them was former child actress Gigi Goyette, with whom Arnold had a seven-year affair. Ever the fitness buff, the bodybuilder allegedly won over the then-16-year-old with the opening line of a lifetime:” You have an amazing ***.”


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Elton John 1986, It was a case of do kiss, don’t tell for the Rocket Man, who married Renate Blauel with the hope of someday having children. Though they put on a good show in public, there was little love lost between them. “The two had some furious fights,” a friend of the bespectacled pop singer revealed. “Renate wouldn’t socialize with most of Elton’s old friends, most of whom are soccer players, fast-living singles in the music business, or gay.” The exceptions to that rule were royals Andrew and Fergie, who tried to talk the odd couple through the rough patches. “If it weren’t for Andrew and Fergie, our marriage would be over,” a greatful Elton said in 1986. Two years later, it was, when the admittedly bisexual (and now admittedly gay) Elton gave up on Ranate and her kind.


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