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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 2014 8:38 pm 
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im watching a documentary at channel15 solar news channel...

"typhoon haiyan, an eye of the storm"

stories are incredible.. even the foreigners who help can't fathom on what happen on tacloban and other places that also affected...


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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 9:59 pm 
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Thank You World

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2014 7:25 pm 
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To the Government of Taiwan..Thank You very much!


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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:20 pm 
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Haiyan Update and the Lives of Survivors (See Pictures 9 Months After Yolanda)
August 11, 2014 By Victorino Abrugar

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Nine months after Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) devastated the central part of the Philippines, there are already changes that we can see. I went to Basey Samar, Tacloban City and Palo Leyte on August 9 and 10 to take pictures and update the Filipinos and the world nine months after Haiyan struck us on November 8 last year.

After nine months, I have observed and realized the following while I was touring the areas affected by Haiyan and having conversations with the survivors.

1. I saw big trees and plants already blooming within the areas that were directly hit by the typhoon (see photos below). I realized that our Mother Nature is more efficient than our government when it comes to rehabilitation and recovery efforts. Mother Nature is indeed destructive when she’s angry. However, when she gives care, it’s truly smooth and wonderful.

2. Recovery and improvements among Yolanda survivors aren’t the same. Some survivors were already back on their feet and having normal lives while others are still suffering (living) in tents and doing everything to survive each day. Their tents are only shelter against the sun, but not against the wind, heavy rains and flood. According to this report by Rappler, there are still 14,500 Yolanda survivors still living in tents as of July 30.

3. Political parties (divisions) are causing the distribution of aid and relief to survivors uneven. You are lucky if the politician who’s in-charge of the distribution is your political ally. If not, then expect that you will get less support from the government.

4. Tacloban City, the most urbanized city in Eastern Visayas, is already showing progress. Private and government establishments, such as malls, department stores, hotels, restaurants, resorts, schools, and government offices are already open for business. However, there are still a number of business establishments that are still ruined and bankrupt due to the looting incident. They still need support from the government to get back on their normal business.

5. Indeed Filipinos are very resilient. After nine months, you can already see them trying to live a happy life, whether they are living in new houses, bunkhouses or tents. One of the things that causes this resilience is unity within the community. Filipinos love to spend time talking with their neighbors. The children enjoy playing with other kids in the neighborhood. This strong ties among the Filipinos keep us strong and persistent no matter what challenges come upon us.

There are many other specific things that you can know and understand in this post. Check out these photos to get some updates about the lives of survivors nine months after Yolanda caused destruction in Eastern Visayas and other parts of the Philippines.

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From San Antonio Basey Samar, we’ve just arrived in Tacloban City. Passenger motor boats from San Antonio to Tacloban and vice versa are already operating. The travel takes only about 15 minutes and the regular fare is P12. Check out the last photo to see the port at San Antonio where we came from.

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The sea is calm. From the boat, you can see Gaisano Capital (right) which is still closed and the ongoing construction of SM Save More (left). While Gaisano Capital is still closed, Gaisano Cental is already back on business since June this year.

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Tacloban Downtown view from the roof top of a building in Avenida Veteranos street.

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The busy street of Avenida Veteranos. You will find here restaurants, hotels, and St. Paul’s Hospital.

Sabang and Anibong, Tacloban City

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This creek in Sabang Anibong was full of debris during the typhoon. But now it looks like it’s already clear. However, the government has already implemented the “40 Meter No Build Zone” which require the residents to leave their lots here and be relocated to safer areas.

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Yes, you’re seeing it right. After nine months, the ship that was washed ashore at Barangay Anibong Tacloban City is still there. A banana tree has already grown and that tree on the right side has already bloomed, but the agency or company responsible for this has not yet started to scrap and remove that ship! It has been moved but has not been removed. (Update: According to a resident in that area, the owner of the ship has already applied for a permit to scrap/salvage the ship but the approval of such permit is still pending at the city government).

If you’re thinking that it’s good to remain it there to serve like a memorabilia, you’re thinking it wrong (Okay, it’s just my personal opinion). Actually, the residents want to remove this ship as soon as possible, fearing that a typhoon or storm surge will come again to wash this ship and ravage houses and lives of people. Should it be scrapped and be broken into pieces to remove it there? … or should the residents be relocated and be granted permanent houses in a safer location and let the ship remain? What do you think? If you’ll ask me, I think a ship docking in a wrong place is a dangerous thing.

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The back view of the ship.

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Residents here have already built temporary shelters.

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They live along with the ship – a ship that destroyed their houses and claimed the lives of their loved ones.

http://rise.ph/wp-content/uploads/2014/ ... -ship5.jpg

Several families are still living in temporary houses in Anibong. They should be relocated in a safer area.

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Old Road Sagkahan, Tacloban City

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Just like Anibong, Old Road Sagkahan is one of the areas in Tacloban located in the shoreline. Houses are washed out here and many people have died in this area. Nine months after Haiyan, many families are still living in tents and temporary shelters.

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A boy sitting on the top of a post built by the government to mark the 40 meter No Build Zone Policy.

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Despite of all the tragedies, these children are still showing their jolliness.

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You can see these tents along Old Road Sagkahan, Tacloban City.

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Residents of Sagkahan have already built these temporary houses along the shore despite of the government’s No Build Zone Policy. During heavy rains and bad weather, they evacuate to Tacloban Astrodome (see following pictures).

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A house in Old Road Sagkahan that was destroyed by Typhoon Yolanda.

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A signage / notice to the public on government’s 40 meter No Build Zone decree.

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Fishing boats are already operating in Sagkahan. They regularly deliver fish at Shed – a popular wet market located in Old Road Sagkahan, Tacloban.

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Tacloban Astrodome as of August 9, 2014. The businesses (bars, restaurants, gym, offices) that were originally here have not yet reopened.

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The front view of Tacloban Astrodome. This structure served as an evacuation center during Haiyan. It’s still serving as an evacuation center for families who are still living in tents and temporary houses during days with bad weather.

San Jose, Tacloban City

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This is my first time to visit San Jose after Haiyan, and I can hardly recognize the place. Several families are still living in tents. If you’re going to Tacloban Airport, you will see these tent cities. That’s how locals call this place.

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San Jose is probably the place where most people died during the typhoon and storm surge.

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I can’t imagine how they keep their daily living here for nine months now.

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A resort and restaurant is located near the tent cities in San Jose. I can’t image how their customers can enjoy and relax at the resort while knowing that a few meter away, many Taclobanons are still suffering from hunger in the tent cities.

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When I asked the residents what the government is planning for them, they told me they don’t know.

And so on...........................click the link below

http://rise.ph/haiyan-update-lives-of-survivors-pictures-9-months-after-yolanda/

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 11:48 pm 
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kwento ng isang survivor sa tacloban para daw makapag simula sila ulit kahit papaano ay nagnegosyo siya. namimili raw siya ng mga scrap kaso ipinatigil raw ni mayor. iba talaga ang mayor sa tacloban ano? pinagbabawalang maghanapbuhay ang kanyang ga mamamayan. :biglaugh:

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 6:50 pm 
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7 Big Lessons in Life I Learned as a Haiyan Survivor
June 12, 2014 By Paul Telimban

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The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives and the dreams shall never die.”
- Edward Kennedy


Super typhoon Haiyan or Yolanda is one of the strongest storms ever recorded in world history. Unfortunately, this natural catastrophe had left Leyte, Samar, and other affected areas a lot of casualties, causing grief and misery among Filipino people. Although my experience is dreadful whenever I think of it, it’s not impossible to think that this calamity had also taught us some valuable lessons in life. The following lessons I learned have even made me stronger and more understanding about life, itself.

1. Don’t expect people to be good all the time.
Humans can be arguably bad or good. During the typhoon, although people have shown their good nature, there are also others who turned to the opposite side. At that time, it could not be helped because people were focused on survival. With food scarcity, individuals stole and threatened other people. What made matter worst, other people were not only after food, but also on to material things such as appliances, money, laptops, and many more. This could be depicted as people destroyed malls and stores. Despite the actions, it should not be ignored that people were all fired up for survival, which was the main reason why they did it. The lesson I learned? Be ready to deal with all kinds of people.

2. Corruption is as deadly as a super typhoon.
Corruption and bad politics can be deadly or even deadlier than a super typhoon. Rescue operations are delayed, relief distribution wasn’t timely, and politicians are blaming each other rather than uniting for a more effective and efficient rehabilitation. But thanks to the International communities who are there to help us and to the locals who didn’t lose hope but stand on their own feet to rise again, we have somehow managed to start a new beginning. Lesson learned? Don’t just prepare for the wrath of a super typhoon but also prepare for the havoc that some of our corrupt politicians could bring. And yes! We have to learn how to stand on our own without relying to the government!

3. Remain grateful and hopeful no matter what.
As a Haiyan survivor, I’d experienced the good and the worst things. But these are only proofs that I’m alive and breathing. In view of this, every survivor should be grateful for where he or she is right now. It’s because you have another opportunity, a second life to face tomorrow and share your life with the people around you.

The odds of the calamity are definitely unfavorable. As a matter of fact, one problem after another comes. There are even moments that I think it’s already the end of the world. In fact, you will likely ask yourself “what now?” when there is no home for you to return to, no family to look for, and no food for you and your family to eat for days. But in the long run, it lets you experience a distinct taste of suffering that is destined to make you stronger rather than make you weaker. Hence, I learned that no matter how life can become gruesome, we still have to live with our best and remain hopeful.

“Hope never abandons you, you abandon it.” -George Weinberg

4. Treasure every second in life.
The quote by Bil Keane, “Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift of God, which is why we call it the present” is applicable to us who have bitter and painful experiences. What we are experiencing now, which is LIFE, is already a gift from above. It’s another chance for us to make memories and enjoy every second of it with God and our loved ones. During the calamity, I learned that every second and every minute of our lives are precious as gold. We have to spend wisely to continue living and building a brighter future for our family and loved ones.

5. There will always be people who are kind and helpful.
Super typhoon Haiyan has intensified our will for valuing other people regardless of their status or relationship with us. It made us spend more time with our family, whom I considered greatest treasures of my life. It also made our fellow Filipinos and other nationals become more helpful by donating goods, medical assistance, and other humanitarian aid. I learned that no matter how many people have gone bad, there are still those who will always be ready to help and show kindness to other people.

6. Faith will give us more strength to go on.
Faith is one thing that is tested during and after the destructive land fall of super typhoon Yolanda. It is undeniable that a lot of people have lost their loved ones during the rampage of the typhoon. After the typhoon, health problems, trauma, and hunger are just some of the problems that waiver our faith. If you ask a victim, it is really tough to get through it.
When you picture the aftermath of the calamity, it is way too unthinkable. You would think “How can my family get through this?” In the end, there is nothing you can hold on to, but to have FAITH. We have to keep believing in the highest that we can get over this biggest challenge in life.

7. We have to put our faith in action.
Finally, I learned that love will truly keep us alive. Hope and faith will give us light to move on. But we have to put our hope and faith in actions to realize love. We can be positive, but we also have to face the reality – the real problems, and do something to solve them. To love my family, my people, and my country, I learned that I have to do something, such as by working hard to earn money for my family, by visiting and comforting other survivors, and by fighting corruption in this country.

The wrap
Indeed, Super Typhoon Haiyan had caused sorrows and suffering to the Filipino people. The experience is unforgettable, but we should learn from the fate that had already passed. Together with the experience, no matter what lessons we have learned from the tragedy, it should not be forgotten. I hope people can use these real-life lessons as a platform to become a better person. More importantly, continue believing and doing what you think is right – because LIFE is great if you live for it with hope, faith and love.


http://rise.ph/lessons-in-life-i-learned-as-a-haiyan-survivor/

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:32 am 
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wala sanang politician na eepal sa pagbisita ng santo papa.

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:39 am 
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kawawa naman ang mga VIP at politiKo sa leyte ayaw silang makasalamuha ng santo papa sa mesa.

bulilyaso na naman ang mga iyakin nito hindi makakapagdrama sa harap ng papa. :lol: :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 9:52 pm 
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10 Reasons Why You Should Visit Tacloban and Leyte in 2015

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Tacloban City continues to rise again after Haiyan struck the city in November 2013.

Tacloban City was severely damaged by super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) on November 8, 2013. I even learned that some foreigners believe Tacloban was totally washed out by the deadly storm surge. So when I published some pictures of the different parts of the city seven months after the typhoon, they couldn’t believe that Tacloban was still there and Taclobanons were already starting to live a normal life.

I knew that the nightmares brought by Haiyan still remain on people’s minds, whether they experienced the onslaught at first hand or they just saw it on TV and read it on social media. However, bad dreams are from the past, and today, Tacloban is already rising again despite of the many issues of corruption in the government (which is not surprising in the Philippines).

With the aid from International communities, the public service of our government, the support of Filipinos from the other parts of the Philippines, and the buoyancy of the Yolanda survivors, Tacloban City is now once again a place where every tourist should visit. The city and its neighboring towns have many great things to offer for tourists, adventurists, storytellers, volunteers, and more.

If you’re planning for a wonderful travel and tour in 2015, here are 10 reasons why you should put Tacloban City in your bucket list.

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ope Francis during The Canonization of Saint John XXIII and Saint John Paul II in Vatican. Photo by Jeffrey Bruno

1. Witness the Papal visit (January).
Pope Francis will visit the Yolanda survivors in Leyte on January 17 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. As part of his itinerary, the Pope will hold an open-air Mass at Tacloban airport starting at 10 a.m. Then he will proceed to the archbishop’s residence in Palo to dine with the poor.

It is said that most, if not all, hotels in Tacloban are now already fully booked for the scheduled visit of the Pope, and the authorities are now asking boarding house owners to accommodate the expected visitors. So if you’re a Catholic devotee, make sure you’re already fully prepared to visit Tacloban on the said date.

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The Sangyaw Pasasalamat parade on June 29, 2014.

2. Enjoy the grand fiesta and festivals (June).
Tacloban doesn’t only celebrate its fiesta (Sto. Niño de Leyte Fiesta: June 30) in a single day, but Taclobanons and their visitors enjoy several events related to it throughout the month of June. During these days, the city becomes livelier. The parks are turned into dining spots where you can enjoy the live performances from various artists and rock bands.

Many tourists also flock to the city to witness the colorful festivals. A day or a few days before the grand fiesta, tourists can enjoy two festivals, namely the Sangyaw Festival (the city’s own festival) and the Pintados-Kasadyaan Festival of Festivals (the festival organized by the province of Leyte). Delegates from other famous Philippine festivals like the Maskara Festival of Bacolod, the Sinulog Festival of Cebu and the Buyogan Festival of Abuyog also participate and perform during the Festival of Festivals to make the event more spectacular.

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The San Juanico Bridge in Leyte and Samar as of August 2014.

3. Dare to cross the longest bridge in the Philippines.
With a length of 2.16 kilometers (1.34 mi), the San Juanico Bridge is the longest bridge in the Philippines that connects two islands, the islands of Samar and Leyte. From Tacloban downtown, you can reach the bridge in 10-15 minutes by bus, passenger jeepney, multicab or private vehicle.

See the beauty of San Juanico bridge and the breathtaking scenery of the islets and whirlpools of San Juanico Strait, one of the narrowest straits in the world. Dare to walk the bridge from end to end and experience the vibration when a bus or truck passes by. The bridge has a lane for walkers, joggers or runners on both sides. Thus, you don’t have to worry about the speedy vehicles crossing the bridge. But still take extra care when taking a selfie and try to be there in the morning or afternoon when the heat of the sun is not excruciating.

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The monuments in MacArthur Landing Memorial Park as of August 2014.

4. Reminisce one of the greatest naval battles in History (October).
Visit MacArthur Landing Memorial Park in the nearby town of Palo to recall one of the most important battles of all time and the famous words of General Douglas MacArthur, “I shall return”. The Battle of Leyte Gulf (October 23–26, 1944 ) is generally considered to be the largest naval battle of World War II and the largest naval battle in history in terms of tonnage of the ships engaged.

The monuments of General Douglas MacArthur, President Sergio Osmeña, Brigadier General Carlos P. Romulo and other men mark the spot where they landed with the American Liberation Forces in October 1944 to begin the Battle of Leyte Gulf and liberate the Philippines from the Japanese invasion. The memorial is not only one of the most famous in country but also in the world as it symbolizes the beginning of the end of World War II.

Leyteños and veterans all over the world celebrate Leyte Landing Anniversary every October 20. The government of Leyte also organize various events within this month. These long-month activities include the reenactment of the Leyte Gulf Landing, awarding of living Veterans, Japanese Veterans memorial ceremonies, and other commemorative programs. There’s also a marathon or fun run held in this period. So if you want to get the most out of the Leyte Landing Anniversary, you may want to visit Palo in October. But you can always visit the monuments and the memorial park anytime.

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The facade of Sto. Nino Shrine and Heritage Museum along Real Street Tacloban City as of August 2014.

5. Behold what’s inside the Sto. Nino Shrine and Heritage Museum.
This mansion along Real Street Tacloban City is one of the presidential mansions of the late president Ferdinand Marcos that was built for his wife Imelda Romualdez Marcos during his regime. Super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) caused some damages to the shrine but the grandeur of the mansion can still be seen inside. The shrine has already reopened for visitors after Yolanda.

For an entrance fee of PHP 230 (good for 3 tourists inclusive of a camera fee), you and your companions can already explore the mansion and listen to the stories about the Marcoses and Romualdez from the guide who will also let you see the different rooms, the grand ballroom, expensive furniture, antiques and other collections of the Marcos family.

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St. Michael the Archangel Church in Basey, Samar. Picture taken in August 2014.

6. Take a side trip to a 17th-century church in the neighboring town of Basey.
Around 12 kilometers from the Samar side of San Juanico Bridge (see # 3) is the town of Basey. Basey (pronounced by the locals as Basay or Basai) is known for its famous Sohoton caves and handwoven mat called Banig. In this town, you will also find St. Michael the Archangel Church, a Roman Catholic church constructed in the 17th century.

The church is located on the top of the hill and served as a watchtower during the Spanish era. Its location saved it from the storm surge of Yolanda. And that is why you will see it still standing there.

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The stunning beauty of Kalanggaman Island in Palompon, Leyte.

7. Visit the beautiful beaches of Eastern Visayas.
Eastern Visayas or Region VIII has many stunning beaches and islands to offer. Region VIII is composed of the provinces of Leyte, Southern Leyte, Samar, Eastern Samar, Northern Samar and Biliran. As the center of Eastern Visayas, Tacloban City will give you access to several white-sand beaches of the region to make your vacation more fun and memorable.

You and your buddies can enjoy the white sand shores of Kalangaman Island in Palompon Leyte, Digyo Island and the Quatro Islas in Inopacan Leyte, Sambawan Island in Biliran, and many other hidden gems in Region VIII.

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The sweet and famous Binagol of Leyte.

8. Try the food and specialties of Leyte.
Taste the special delicacies that you can only find in Leyte. Try the sweet Binagol (a delicacy originated from Dagami Leyte which is made from sweetened mashed giant taro called talian packed in a half coconut shell called bagol) or the Suman ***** (a milk and chocolate flavored sticky rice cake or suman twisted and wrapped in banana leaves). You can also buy these native delicacies along Zamora Street in Tacloban City for your pasalubong or gifts to your loved ones back at home.

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The Robinsons Place Tacloban in Marasbaras is currently the largest mall in the region. The mall has fully reopened since June 2014.

9. See how the city rises again after Yolanda.
Tacloban has already improved a lot since Yolanda struck the city in November 2013. Malls, supermarkets, banks, and other establishments are already back to business. You can already shop, dine and watch movies in cinemas at Robinsons Place in Marasbaras Tacloban. There are also several hotels, restaurants, coffee shops and bars where you can stay, dine, hangout, and enjoy a nightlife in the city. The rehabilitation efforts and improvements in the city will continue. In 2015 and in the years to come, expect a better and a more developed Tacloban City.

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The children of homeless Haiyan Survivors still living in tents in Old Road Sagkahan, Tacloban City.

10. Continue helping the poor survivors.
You can do this one without waiting for the year 2015 to come. Although many Yolanda survivors are already living a normal life, thousands of other survivors are still living in tents and temporary bunk houses. One of the greatest reasons you can have to visit Tacloban is to help and donate to these homeless survivors directly. By helping them personally, you can be assured that your kindness will be received by them straightforwardly.

There are many other reasons why you should include Tacloban City in your list of next top destinations. And if you will get to know more about the city and the whole region, you’ll discover more fascinating wonders of nature, interesting stories from the people, and hundred more reasons to return. So what are you waiting for? Make sure you already have an itinerary for your travel to Tacloban City and the rest of Eastern Visayas.


http://rise.ph/10-reasons-why-you-should-visit-tacloban-leyte-in-2015/

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 9:19 pm 
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iyong rest house ni mayor naipaayos na ba? :biglaugh:

iniyak-iyakan pa man din niya iyon. :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 9:25 pm 
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May bobong taga-himud ng pwet na nakapasok! :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 9:49 pm 
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mag away naman pud mo ha..

bai di naman ka active sa fb..
:D


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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 10:44 pm 
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Kakagaling ko lang ng Tacloban last oct. 17. Hirap parin makabangon ang mga nasalanta. Mas marami pa yata naitutulong ang mga Koreans kaysa sa Philippine goverment.


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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:06 pm 
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El Pintor wrote:
Kakagaling ko lang ng Tacloban last oct. 17. Hirap parin makabangon ang mga nasalanta. Mas marami pa yata naitutulong ang mga Koreans kaysa sa Philippine goverment.


Tama yan Bai..marami nang paaralan ang naipaayos ng mga Korean..pero yung gobyerno kahit isa wala pa. 8)

Pinaplano pa raw nila sa loob ng sampung taon kung alin ang uunahing ayusin. :biglaugh:

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 Post subject: Re: Tacloban at Present!
PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 3:19 pm 
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Haiyan! wrote:
El Pintor wrote:
Kakagaling ko lang ng Tacloban last oct. 17. Hirap parin makabangon ang mga nasalanta. Mas marami pa yata naitutulong ang mga Koreans kaysa sa Philippine goverment.


Tama yan Bai..marami nang paaralan ang naipaayos ng mga Korean..pero yung gobyerno kahit isa wala pa. 8)

Pinaplano pa raw nila sa loob ng sampung taon kung alin ang uunahing ayusin. :biglaugh:


Yun nga Bai, kahit yung domestic airport, hindi parin tapos. Napaka-liit na property lang naman noon, hindi parin maayos-ayos.
Mabuti pa yung Tzu-chi/chuchi foundation (Taiwan Buddhist), madami rin naipatayong classrooms. Samantalang sarili nating gobyerno, mukhang ginawa pang gatasan ang mga nasalanta ng bagyo.
Balita ko rin, minsan lang nakita ng mga tao doon si Ping Lacson at sabi pa nya "gusto ko kayo tulungan...pero hindi ko hawak ang budget".
Binoto ko pa naman sya dati.


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