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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2018 6:42 pm 
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truboxer wrote:
TheEnigma wrote:
Two fine wins from the first two rounds -- I think that’s a bit impressive. :)

In the first round, Wesley beat Zherebukh by outcalculating him tactically in the middle-game phase. If we review it, we can observe how tactics abound, particularly in the unplayed variations as shown by chess engine evaluations. Before Zherebukh committed a couple of small inaccuracies, however, we can see also some nice positional maneuvering by Wesley which was reminiscent of former world champion Tigran Petrosian’s style of play. (To the uninitiated, Petrosian’s games usually feature protracted stages of maneuvering in which he gradually exploits an “imperceptible” structural defect in his opponent’s position.)

In our game, it was noteworthy there weren’t any exchanges made before move 22. Wesley’s seemingly harmless back-rank (and Petrosian-like) maneuvers (17...Ba8 and 18...Nb8) paved the way for his knight to occupy the hole on White’s d4, and for his queen to be able to slide to a7 thereby creating potential open files for his rooks on d8 and c8. The ensuing tactics netted Wesley a pawn and gave him the much better position going into the endgame phase. Finally, after all the rooks have been exchanged, the resulting minor-piece ending netted Wesley yet another pawn, enough for his opponent to concede defeat.

In addition, it’s interesting to note that Wesley employed some opening concepts that were undoubtedly Fischer’s opening approach in facing against the closed or semi-closed lines of the Sicilian (i.e., White refrains from playing his pawn to d4 in the opening stages). In his games, we usually find Fischer fianchettoing both his bishops when going against White in this type of Sicilian set-up. Incidentally, both of Wesley’s fianchettoed bishops in our game were the reasons that would explain the tactics contained in the unplayed variations of the game.

As to the second-round game, Wesley clearly outplayed Onischuk in the Ruy Lopez opening. Wesley had shown better positional judgment, and he was able to convert his advantage into a kingside attack that reduced Black to practically having no effective counterplay. Wesley eventually won a pawn, and this was enough to simplify the play into an endgame with decisive advantage, as he had obtained a passed e-pawn in the process. The final position speaks for itself of the reason of Onischuk’s resignation. Black would have to exchange rooks to prevent White’s e-pawn from queening. In so doing, White’s king will be able to advance further into Black’s territory and will win Black’s pawns through proper timing (tempo), that is, by employing the chess endgame concept of ‘opposition’.

Thus, to the uninitiated, the lesson to be learned here is that one must first have a proper understanding and appreciation of King-and-pawn endings before he will be able to handle well most especially rook endings.


I have been reading most of your analysis and think that you have deeper understanding of the game of chess. I would like to know if you are a chess player of a GM caliber of a pure chess enthusiast? Just curious, no need to reply if this will cause inconvenience to you.

Thanks for the appreciation. In spite of having played in rated tournaments before, I remain first and foremost a chess enthusiast. Due to the demands of my profession, I have long stopped from active playing. But, as I have hinted at some point here in the forum, my passion for the game has never waned. I’m still fond of reading chess literature and devouring chess books I can lay my hands on.

Back to topic, I think the 3rd- and 4th-round games were ‘ordinary’ draws. Although there was some attacking compensation for Wesley’s sacrificed d-pawn in game 3, it was not easy to translate it into a decisive advantage. His opponent, the 15-year old Awonder Liang, found the right counters to simplify the position and reduce the game into a drawish finale.

In game 4 also, although there was some positional gain by White in the mid-game phase, Wesley made a slightly inferior move (24. Nd3) that allowed his opponent (Lenderman) to get some counterplay on the kingside. Wesley was a pawn up, but his king was exposed to a potential perpetual check by Black’s queen. No way for White to progress, so the draw was agreed.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2018 11:46 am 
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joeyj wrote:
R2 : 19-Apr : GM So, Wesley(2786)-GM Onischuk, Alexander(2672) : 1-0 : +3.4 : 2792.4

https://chessaccount.com/live-ratings-phi/wesley-so-live-ratings/



Yehey... Another win for Wes. Sana tuloy-tuloy lang... 8) :)

More power to you Wesley So... :angel: :angel: :angel:

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2018 7:44 pm 
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Only 3 players remain undefeated. Shankland, So and Nakamura. The rest suffered defeat including Caruana. Shankland, who is the leader with 4.5 points will face So (4 points) in the 7th round. Hopefully, So can get the full point to catch up and even lead (only if Caruana, who has 4 points draws his 7th round game).


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:32 am 
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another draw for Wes... sana makakuha ng wins in the succeeding rounds... 8)

Go Wesley So. More power... :angel: :angel: :angel:

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- It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.
- Finding good players is easy. Getting them to play as a team is another story.
- Defense wins games. Excellent defense wins championships.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:04 pm 
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Good luck GM So in your match vs Caruana. Kaya mo yan! :swordplay:

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 1:26 pm 
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Alam ko marami rito magrereact kapag sinabi ko sana lumaban si Wesley kay Shankland, hindi dapat draw yun! Hindi ako naggagaling-galingan, sana naman di ako ma-misinterpret. Marami rin kasi ritong magagaling. Nagpapahayag lang ng opinyon. O ano react na kayo mga magagaling!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:29 pm 
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Sorry, but the final position is not winnable for Black. It would appear worthy, of course, for Wesley to continue pressing for a win, but such an effort would be futile against any master. We see that we have three pawns for Black versus White’s two on the same side of the board (i.e., on the kingside). White will only have to make decent movements of his rook to hold the position, and Black then won’t be able make any real progress. If Black were to force the issue and make exchanges with the pawns, he would be left with only one pawn – not enough to win, as the “Philidor position” in the endgame can be reached rather easily.

To the uninitiated, the Philidor position (also known as ‘third rank defense’) is a drawing technique in the endgame when the defender has a king and rook versus a king, rook, and a pawn. In our game, White (or Shankland) will only have to place his king on the queening square of Black’s pawn, and position his rook on a safe square on his third rank (Black’s sixth) to prevent Black’s (Wesley’s) king to advance.

For illustration purposes, here’s a quick look at the endgame lesson on how to defend the Philidor position:

https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-three-philidor-positions

More power on the next round! :)

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 12:56 am 
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#MeTooMayroongOpinionSaLaroNiWes

But.... my chess skills is not even comparable to that of a Master.

Meaning.... Wes knows a LOT, LOT, LOT, LOT, LOT , LOT, LOT, LOT, LOT , LOT, LOT, LOT, LOT , LOT, LOT, LOT, LOT... more than me.

Fact is.... a pawn up is not always winnable even though to MIRONS, it looks like a winning position.

And.... I remember one of Wes games where the situation on the board looks like a dead draw (as many MIRONS opined) but Wes kept on banging (very loooong game) and won.

Conclusion.... SuperGMs know best.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:34 am 
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Well that's it, with one more round to go at the US Chess Championship, So has no more chance of retaining his US title. It will be between Caruana , 7pts, and the surprising Shankland , 7.5 pts, after tomorrow's results as to who will emerge as the champ. Nothing personal but I think So had reached his apex in 2016 and early 2017 and hasn't been able to win a single tournament since. Most of his games are boring and by the middle game one will already know that the game would most probably end in a draw unless a major blunder is committed. Hiring a coach might improve his creativity but knowing his tendency, he might just keep relying on computers. I


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:57 am 
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Relax bro :) Wesley is still young, I hope he matures like the great Bobby Fischer (29 years old when he became champ). There is ups & downs off course, the important thing is that everyone noticed that Wesley is special talent and can win the championship. Even the great Garry Kasparov believes. Magugulat nlng tayo champion na! I hope history repeat itself. The last and only American champion is a Jew who rejected his country & race, the next one would be an American fighting valiantly & proud of his Filipino race. He will be champ with God's help! :)

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 4:26 pm 
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DTruthshallmakeufree wrote:
Well that's it, with one more round to go at the US Chess Championship, So has no more chance of retaining his US title. It will be between Caruana , 7pts, and the surprising Shankland , 7.5 pts, after tomorrow's results as to who will emerge as the champ. Nothing personal but I think So had reached his apex in 2016 and early 2017 and hasn't been able to win a single tournament since. Most of his games are boring and by the middle game one will already know that the game would most probably end in a draw unless a major blunder is committed. Hiring a coach might improve his creativity but knowing his tendency, he might just keep relying on computers. I


You can say the same to those who reached number 2 during their careers like Aronian, Caruana, Giri, Mamedyarov, and Nakamura. If these Grandmasters are still trying and obviously have not reached their apex, why can't we say the same for Wesley?

Before this year and last year, when was the last time, Caruana, Aronian, Mamedyarov and Girl won a super tournament?

These other super grandmasters have been in the World Candidates several times and many have not won a super tournament for a number of years. They are no different from Wesley. I think Wesely is still improving. It is only 2018. It was just last year that Wesley won the Tata Steel Chess Tournament. We can't expect Wesley to win a super tournament every year. That's unrealistic. Even Carlsen and Caruana don't win every year and we don't think that they already reached their apex.


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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 3:57 pm 
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I believe Wes is on experimental phase. Wanting and taking time to get to next level.

Being a pinoy of great talent, who wants to carve his own path to maturity. Wherever that leads him.
He is still young & has all the time in the world to explore, carve his path.


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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2018 12:50 pm 
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Just keep on improving. It ain't his time yet.


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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 1:36 pm 
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May aabangan uli.


Norway Chess Classic kicks off on May 27 in Stavanger.

The competition scheduled to run until June 8 features as strong a competition as usual. Current title holder, Armenian grandmaster Levon Aronian will be playing too.

His competitors this year are Magnus Carlsen (Norway), Fabiano Caruana (USA), Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (France), Viswanathan Anand (India), Sergey Karjakin (Russia), Wesley So (USA), Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (Azerbaijan), Hikaru Nakamura (USA), and Ding Liren (China).

If players earn equal amount of points, the winner will be decided by a tie-break.


http://sport.mediamax.am/en/news/chess/28459


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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 3:23 pm 
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ryan_c wrote:
May aabangan uli.


Norway Chess Classic kicks off on May 27 in Stavanger.

The competition scheduled to run until June 8 features as strong a competition as usual. Current title holder, Armenian grandmaster Levon Aronian will be playing too.

His competitors this year are Magnus Carlsen (Norway), Fabiano Caruana (USA), Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (France), Viswanathan Anand (India), Sergey Karjakin (Russia), Wesley So (USA), Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (Azerbaijan), Hikaru Nakamura (USA), and Ding Liren (China).

If players earn equal amount of points, the winner will be decided by a tie-break.



http://sport.mediamax.am/en/news/chess/28459


Hopefully Wes will have a good showing in this tourney... :) :D

_________________
- It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.
- Finding good players is easy. Getting them to play as a team is another story.
- Defense wins games. Excellent defense wins championships.


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