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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:13 am 
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Di kapani paniwala kung sinabi ni Fisher na 2 to 3 moves lang ang kaya niyang i figure out kasi nagagawa yan ng mga common players eh. Maybe case to case basis lang. Meron kasing two moves mate puzzles na mahirap i solve.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:21 pm 
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"Di kapani paniwala kung sinabi ni Fisher na 2 to 3 moves lang ang kaya niyang i figure out kasi nagagawa yan ng mga common players eh. Maybe case to case basis lang. Meron kasing two moves mate puzzles na mahirap i solve."


Agree, Bro. Knowing Fischer's personality, ayaw nya lang sagutin ng husto ang nagtanong. Kaya nga sabi nya, but they are the best moves." Dinidepensa nya pa ang sagot nya.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:40 pm 
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"Very good observation, Bro black bishop!

The elegant finish to the second game of the playoff with Onischuk particularly struck me. Wesley playing Black escaped with a draw by forcing the White King to defend his Queen through limited squares. The “checked” White King could only slide back-and-forth horizontally along the f3, e3, and d3 squares.

There is geometric beauty in the concluding positions. Depending on which square the White King occupies, the Black knight can go around checking the White King on the squares h4, g2, e1, c2, and even b4. In layman’s terms, we say that the Black knight traces a semi-circular path while the White King can only move in reciprocating motion (like an engine piston within a cylinder) along three squares.

Mathematically speaking, however, the knight path appears to be more of another geometric construction (perhaps Rizal would agree with me on this). For instance, had we tried to fit a curve (employing spline interpolation) to the points corresponding to the above-mentioned squares for the knight, we could have generated something which is akin to a semi-elliptic curve.

If my memory still serves, it was former world champion Mikhail Tal who said that chess improves your imagination and geometrical understanding."


Thanks, Bro TheEnigma. Yours was a great grandmaster-like analysis, replete with mathematical analogies. If chess engines are using algorithms in their calculations, your brainpower is employing geometrical, symmetrical, and spatial relationships! Anyway, Wesley has special talent in playing the knight, that is why Onischuk was caught saying, " I wish I could play the knight like Wesley does."


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 5:20 pm 
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Indomitable_Soldier wrote:
Di kapani paniwala kung sinabi ni Fisher na 2 to 3 moves lang ang kaya niyang i figure out kasi nagagawa yan ng mga common players eh. Maybe case to case basis lang. Meron kasing two moves mate puzzles na mahirap i solve.



I don't know why he said that but Fischer, of course, can see several moves longer.

Wesley mentioned that it's important for him to win the US Championship because it was won by great players before, most notably Bobby Fischer.

Would just like to mention that Fischer won the 1963 US Championship with a perfect score of 11 wins, 0 draws and 0 losses. An unbelievable result. During his time Fischer has no equal.

If someone today can win a big tournament with a perfect score, the chess world will go gaga.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 5:55 pm 
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Quote:
Would just like to mention that Fischer won the 1963 US Championship with a perfect score of 11 wins, 0 draws and 0 losses. An unbelievable result. During his time Fischer has no equal.

If someone today can win a big tournament with a perfect score, the chess world will go gaga.

` that 2-3 move remark, if true/accurate, was probably made in jest...

:wink:

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:55 pm 
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Indomitable_Soldier wrote:
Di kapani paniwala kung sinabi ni Fisher na 2 to 3 moves lang ang kaya niyang i figure out kasi nagagawa yan ng mga common players eh. Maybe case to case basis lang. Meron kasing two moves mate puzzles na mahirap i solve.

I remember Bobby Fischer, when he was asked kung ilang moves ang maisip nya bago tumira, and he said something like this, "I anticipate only two or three moves, but they are the best"! But that's debatable, alam naman natin kung gaano kagaling si Fischer.

Sa pagka intindi ko dito Fischer calculates at least 2 or 3 moves that he expects (anticipate) his opponent will make in the next turn.
For example Fischer is white and white to play from start position, he plans to play e4, and expects his opponent to play either c5, e5 or c6. These 3 moves are what he is calculating deeper.

Code:
 
               e4
           /    |    \
         c5    e5    c6
       /        |       \
    Nf3        Nf3       d4
  /  |  \     / | \     / | \
d6  e6  a6
 

When the opponent made a move that was not in the 3 moves he was calculating, he would probably spend more time in his next move.
But if the opponent made a move that is in one of the moves that he had calculated already, he may immediately make the reply, I saw this behaviour from Wesley and other players. This is where Wesley may get a blunder or small mistake, which he tries to remind himself to "double check" his previous analysis.

The depth of analysis would probably vary depending on the position, if there are forced moves players may think deeper.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 9:38 pm 
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Of course sa bawat move, may malawak na variations yan. At maraming alternatives na kailangang alam na rin kung ano ang best counter if not perfect. But to say 2 to 3 moves lang ang kayang i figure out. Hindi sa gaya ni Fisher dapat manggaling yan. Unless it's just an act of humility.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 3:15 am 
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TheEnigma wrote:
black bishop wrote:
This recent US Chess Championship should be the strongest in years, and perhaps the most competitive. The presence of the three of the world's top 10 players made it even more popular, so much so that it generated, perhaps, the most interest ever in the history of the tournament and among the world's chess loving netizens. The victory of Wesley So added another feather to his cap and was a fitting exclamation point to his previous other victories in stronger tournaments like the Sinquefield, London, and Tata Steel. His previous victories would look half-baked if he did not win the US Chess Championship.

It looked like a blessing in disguise that Wesley had to go through the playoff with Onishuk. In the two rapid playoff games, Wesley produced more marvels from his cerebral armory: one brilliant win with white, and a mind-boggling draw with black.
It is obvious that the commentators love Wesley, as much as we love him. Well, everybody loves a winner! Albeit late, I am still happy to congratulate Wesley for the well earned victory. Kudos, Wes, and thank you for giving us something to look forward to and to cheer about. PEACE , everyone!

Very good observation, Bro black bishop!

The elegant finish to the second game of the playoff with Onischuk particularly struck me. Wesley playing Black escaped with a draw by forcing the White King to defend his Queen through limited squares. The “checked” White King could only slide back-and-forth horizontally along the f3, e3, and d3 squares.

There is geometric beauty in the concluding positions. Depending on which square the White King occupies, the Black knight can go around checking the White King on the squares h4, g2, e1, c2, and even b4. In layman’s terms, we say that the Black knight traces a semi-circular path while the White King can only move in reciprocating motion (like an engine piston within a cylinder) along three squares.

Mathematically speaking, however, the knight path appears to be more of another geometric construction (perhaps Rizal would agree with me on this). For instance, had we tried to fit a curve (employing spline interpolation) to the points corresponding to the above-mentioned squares for the knight, we could have generated something which is akin to a semi-elliptic curve.

If my memory still serves, it was former world champion Mikhail Tal who said that chess improves your imagination and geometrical understanding. :D


rizalincarnate wrote:
Bro Enigma. I could see a spiral locus of points trod by the knight, something like the path of a fly that is about to die after it was hit by a fly swatter. But more than a fly, I could see white king's predicament as akin to a dog in coitus with a bitch (that is, a female dog) and the black knight as another male dog disturbing their 'private' moments. The white king would have wanted to separate from the bitch (queen), but could not because the swelling and turgidity had not subsided yet, if you know what I mean.

That's one funny analogy, Bro Rizal!

You seemed to have a penchant for such acts despite being "retired" already. :)

If Mikhail Tal were alive today, he would probably have said: chess improves your imagination and coital understanding. :lol:

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 3:23 am 
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black bishop wrote:
"Very good observation, Bro black bishop!

The elegant finish to the second game of the playoff with Onischuk particularly struck me. Wesley playing Black escaped with a draw by forcing the White King to defend his Queen through limited squares. The “checked” White King could only slide back-and-forth horizontally along the f3, e3, and d3 squares.

There is geometric beauty in the concluding positions. Depending on which square the White King occupies, the Black knight can go around checking the White King on the squares h4, g2, e1, c2, and even b4. In layman’s terms, we say that the Black knight traces a semi-circular path while the White King can only move in reciprocating motion (like an engine piston within a cylinder) along three squares.

Mathematically speaking, however, the knight path appears to be more of another geometric construction (perhaps Rizal would agree with me on this). For instance, had we tried to fit a curve (employing spline interpolation) to the points corresponding to the above-mentioned squares for the knight, we could have generated something which is akin to a semi-elliptic curve.

If my memory still serves, it was former world champion Mikhail Tal who said that chess improves your imagination and geometrical understanding."


Thanks, Bro TheEnigma. Yours was a great grandmaster-like analysis, replete with mathematical analogies. If chess engines are using algorithms in their calculations, your brainpower is employing geometrical, symmetrical, and spatial relationships! Anyway, Wesley has special talent in playing the knight, that is why Onischuk was caught saying, " I wish I could play the knight like Wesley does."

I agree with Onischuk about Wesley’s virtuoso handling of the knight. Interestingly, I found this trait to be existent also among the ‘older’ Filipino masters. Eugene Torre, for instance, in his youthful years seemed to prefer the knight over the bishop -- and he did display such excellent handling of this minor piece in his early games. (A number of his games in the Asian Zonal ’72, where he became the champion, are good examples.)

Indeed, Torre preferred the Alekhine’s Defense (1...Nf6) against White’s 1.e4 during his youthful years. He only switched to other defenses after Karpov demolished his once vaunted Alekhine’s in 1973. But, Torre got his revenge with beating Karpov (already the world champion) in 1976, by employing this time the Sicilian against Karpov’s 1.e4.

The older-generation Filipino masters were actually feared more ‘tactically’ than ‘positionally’. It’s probably the reason why their foreign counterparts often refused to go head-to-head with them in a tactical battle -- but only in positional ones. In such tactical skirmishes, knight maneuvering always plays a decisive role.

It seemed to me that these older masters were attracted to the “jumping” capabilities of the knight more than the “long-range” capabilities of the bishop. Here’s one example of Torre’s handing of his two knights against two bishops in his game against Nigel Short in the 2012 Olympiad:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1688401

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 9:22 am 
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I am a believer of tactical and positional styles of the game but because I can't foresee the moves beyond three to four moves I am experiencing defeat against those who could see what will happen beyond. Kasi kita ko man kung ano ang mangyayari within three to four kung di ko na kayang isipin ang best moves for fifth talo na ako kung nakikita iyon ng kalaban ko. Kaya nga para sa akin mananaig yung nakakaisip ng mas malayo. Kung kapusin man sila sa strategy gaya ng standard safe positional structures pag natutunan nila yan sila pa rin na may extra advanced capability to think will win.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 9:34 am 
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I was playing with our former olympic chess player Celestino Cain when he was still alive and taught me a lot of best positional structures. Kaya niyang mag isip beyond seven moves. Ipinakikita nya sa akin kung ano ang possible outcome beyond three to four moves bilang partida. So sa gayon makakapag isip ako ng best moves ko after three to four moves. Pero parang sasabog na ulo ko dahil sobrang dami na ng conflicts. Celes Cain was a former playmates of Wesley So here in Bacoor noong bata pa si Wesley.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:11 pm 
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Wesley So Wins as 2017 U.S. Chess Champion


Image


The US Chess Championship that took place in Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. from 29th March to 10th April 2017 was won by GM Wesley So,

Read more: https://chessaccount.com/wesley-so-wins-as-2017-u-s-chess-champion/

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The Lord has shown you what is good.
He has told you what he requires of you.
You must act with justice.
You must love to show mercy.
And you must be humble as you live in the sight of your God.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:40 pm 
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Indomitable_Soldier wrote:
I was playing with our former olympic chess player Celestino Cain when he was still alive and taught me a lot of best positional structures. Kaya niyang mag isip beyond seven moves. Ipinakikita nya sa akin kung ano ang possible outcome beyond three to four moves bilang partida. So sa gayon makakapag isip ako ng best moves ko after three to four moves. Pero parang sasabog na ulo ko dahil sobrang dami na ng conflicts. Celes Cain was a former playmates of Wesley So here in Bacoor noong bata pa si Wesley.

Yes, I remember Celestino Cain. If I’m not mistaken, he’s a contemporay of IM’s Ricky de Guzman, Domingo Ramos, Cris Ramayrat, Chito Garma, Petronio Roca, and a host of others. They comprise the generation next to that of Torre, Balinas, Cardoso, Naranja, etc.

In the mid ‘80’s some of these masters used to be invited to the Rose Pharmacy Chess Classics in Cebu. With modesty aside, I was able to participate in one of the phases (early 1985), and I had the privilege to play against Ramos and Ramayrat in the Swiss system event. IM Ruben Rodriguez was also there, but the tournamnet was won by Ricky de Guzman (if my memory still serves).

Nevertheless, I had the privilege also to play and win agianst the locals, among them – Rey Ranile (I was Black side and was able to defend well aagainst the Sicilian Velimirovic Nd5 knight sacrifice), Sollano (I was White side in a Ruy Lopez Schliemann variation), Pagadian (I was White side in a 3.ed5 exchange variation). All these years I have kept copies of the scoresheets as memento.

Pardon me, but I mentioned the above in order to portay some chess setting before Wesley came into the scene. :D

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:51 pm 
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Medyo negative ang dating sa akin ng sinabi ni Carlsen na kaya niyang talunin si Fisher. I but saw Wesley defeated Carlsen in YouTube. During the time of Fisher wala pang computer chess at engine chess noon. Pwede ba nating masabing mas magagaling ang Chess masters ngayon with the help of chess technologies nowadays?


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 8:20 pm 
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Indomitable_Soldier wrote:
Medyo negative ang dating sa akin ng sinabi ni Carlsen na kaya niyang talunin si Fisher. I but saw Wesley defeated Carlsen in YouTube. During the time of Fisher wala pang computer chess at engine chess noon. Pwede ba nating masabing mas magagaling ang Chess masters ngayon with the help of chess technologies nowadays?

yes becoz of technologies sharpening the mind faster...

di na maiiwasan yan... basta wala lang intervention ng drugs sa mental and physical.


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