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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 8:22 am 
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here are good chess tips from GM Arthur Bisguier


TIP 1:
Look at your opponent's move.
Every time your opponent makes a move, you should stop and think: Why was that move chosen? Is a piece in danger? Are there any other threats I should watch out for? What sort of plan does my opponent have in mind? Only by defending against your opponent's threats will you be able to successfully carry out your own strategies. Once you figure out what your opponent is attempting to do, you can play to nip those plans in the bud.

TIP 2:
Make the best possible move.
When you're considering a move, ask yourself these questions:

a. Will the piece I'm moving go to a better square than the one it's on now?
b. Can I improve my position even more by increasing the effectiveness of a different piece?
c. Does this move help to defend against my opponent's threats?
d. Will the piece I move be safe on its new square?

* i. If it's a Pawn, consider: Can I keep it protected from attack?
* ii. If it's another piece, consider: Can the enemy drive it away, thus making me lose valuable time?


Even if your intended move has good points, it may not be the best move at that moment. Emanuel Lasker, a former world champion, said: "When you see a good move, wait - look for a better one!" Following this advice is bound to improve your chess.

TIP 3:
Have a plan.
If you threaten something here in one move, something over there in the next move, and so forth, your opponent will have an easy time defending. Your pieces have to work together to be effective. Just imagine each instrument in an orchestra playing a different tune! When you develop a plan, your men can work in harmony. For example, you might plan to attack your opponent's King; one piece alone probably wouldn't be able to do much, but the combined strength of several pieces makes a powerful attacking force. Another plan could be taking control of all the squares in a particular area of the board. The chess men are your "team"; to be a good "coach," you have to use all of their strengths together.

TIP 4:
Know what the pieces are worth.
When you are considering giving up some of your pieces for some of your opponent's, you should think about the values of the men, and not just how many each player possesses. The player whose men add up to a greater value will usually have the advantage. So a crucial step in making decisions is to add up the material, or value, of each player's men. The Pawn is the least valuable piece, so it is a convenient unit of measure. It moves slowly, and can never go backward. Knights and Bishops are approximately equal, worth about three Pawns each. The Knight is the only piece that can jump over other men. The Bishops are speedier, but each one can reach only half the squares. A Rook moves quickly and can reach every square; its value is five Pawns. A combination of two minor pieces (Knights and Bishops) can often subdue a Rook. A Queen is worth nine Pawns, almost as much as two Rooks. It can move to the greatest number of squares in most positions. The King can be a valuable fighter too, but we do not evaluate its strength because it cannot be traded.

TIP 5:
Develop quickly and well.
Time is a very important element of chess. The player whose men are ready for action sooner will be able to control the course of the game. If you want to be that player, you have to develop your men efficiently to powerful posts. Many inexperienced players like to move a lot of Pawns at the beginning of the game to control space on the chessboard. But you can't win with Pawns alone! Since Knights, Bishops, Rooks, and Queens can move farther than Pawns and threaten more distant targets, it's a good idea to bring them out soon, after you've moved enough Pawns to guarantee that your stronger pieces won't be chased back by your opponent's Pawns. After all the other pieces are developed, it's easier to see what Pawns you should move to fit in with your plans. It's tempting to bring the Queen out very early, because it's the most powerful piece. But your opponent can chase your Queen back by threatening it with less valuable pieces. Look at Example A: after 1...Nf6, Black threatens to drive the white Queen away with either 2...Nd4 or 2....d6 and 3...Bg4. Instead of just moving pieces out, try to determine the best square for each piece and bring it there in as few moves as possible. This may save you from wasting moves later in the game.

TIP 6:
Control the center.
In many cases, the person who controls the four squares at the center of the board will have the better game. There are simple reasons for this. First, a piece in the center controls more of the board than one that is somewhere else. As an example, place one Knight on a center square and another in one of the corners of the board. The Knight in the center can move to eight different squares, while the "cornered" one only has two possible moves! Second, control of the center provides an avenue for your pieces to travel from one side of the board to the other. To move a piece across the board, you will often have to take it through the center. If your pieces can get to the other side faster than your opponent's pieces, you will often be able to mount a successful attack there before he can bring over enough pieces to defend.

TIP 7:
Keep your King safe.
Everyone knows that the object of the game is to checkmate the opponent's King. But sometimes a player thinks about his own plans so much that he forgets that his opponent is also King hunting! It's generally a good idea to place your King in a safe place by castling early in the game. Once you've castled, you should be very careful about advancing the Pawns near your King. They are like bodyguards; the farther away they go, the easier it is for your opponent's pieces to get close to your King. (For this reason, it's often good to try to force your opponent to move the Pawns near his King.)

TIP 8:
The best time to trade.
The best time to trade men is when you can capture men worth more than the ones you will be giving up, which is called "winning material" (see Tip 4, Know what the men are worth). But the opportunity to do this may not arise if your opponent is very careful. Since you will probably have many chances to exchange men on an "even" basis, it's useful to know when you should or shouldn't do this. There are several important considerations. As a general rule, if you have the initiative (your pieces are better developed, and you're controlling the game), try not to exchange men unless it increases your advantage in some clear way. The fewer men each player has, the weaker the attacking player's threats become, and the easier it is for the defending side to meet these threats. Another time not to trade pieces is when your opponent has a cramped position with little space for the pieces to maneuver. It's tough to move a lot of pieces around in a cramped position, but easier to move just a few. One way to gain an advantage is to trade peices to weaken your opponent's Pawn structure. If, for example, you can capture with a piece that your opponent can only recapture in a way that will give him "doubled Pawns". it will often be to your advantage to make that trade. The player who is ahead in material will usually benefit from trades. It's sort of like basketball or soccer; five players will sometimes have trouble scoring against four opposing players, but take away three from each side and the stronger team will find it easier to score with two players against one. So, to summarize: It's usually good to trade pieces if your opponent has the initiative, if you have a cramped position, if you can weaken your opponent's Pawn structure, or if you are ahead in material. There are exceptions, of course, but following these rules should bring you considerable success.

TIP 9:
Think about the endgame.
From the time the game begins, you should remember that every move you make may affect your chances in the endgame. For instance, in the earlier parts of the game, a Knight and a Bishop are about equally powerful. Toward the end of the game, though, when there are fewer men in the way, the Bishop can exert its influence in all parts of the board at once, while the Knight still takes a long time to get anywhere. So before you trade a Bishop for a Knight, think not just about the next few moves but also about the endgame. Pawn structure is crucial in the endgame. When you capture one of your opponent's men with a Pawn, you'll often create an open file that will help your Rooks and Queen to reach your opponent's side of the board, but you may also get doubled Pawns. Since doubled Pawns cannot defend each other, they are liability in the endgame. If your opponent survives the middlegame, you may have an uphill fight later. Concentrate on your immediate plans, as well as your opponent's - but always keep the endgame in mind!

TIP 10:
Always be alert.
There is a tendency for people to relax once they have reached a good position or to give up hope if their position is very bad when they play chess. These attitudes are natural, but both lead to bad results. Many players - even chess world champions - have achieved winning positions, only to lose because they relaxed too soon. Even the best position won't win by itself; you have to give it some help! In almost any position, the "losing" player will still be able to make threats. The "winning" player has to be alert enough to prevent these positions. Advice: If you have a better position, watch out! One careless move could throw away your hard-won advantage. Even as you're carrying out your winning plans, you must watch out for your opponent's threats. Conversely, if you have a worse position, don't give up! Keep making strong moves, and try to complicate the position as much as possible. If your opponent slips, you may get the chance to make a comeback. Remember: Where there's life, there's hope. So be alert all the time, no matter what the position is like. A little bit of extra care can pay off in a big way.


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:04 am 
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MIC TYSON wrote:
MITZPUNCHER wrote:
I dont know whats wrong with me. I read chess books, read chess games on the web and even analyze it. Y i cant improve my game? Many ordinary chess players can beat me. Can you help me how to improve my game? I do have lots of patience in fact i sometime play the game in hours.Will u give a hint what to do? What would i do first and what would i need to improve. I love chess game but it seems that the game i love doesnt like me.huh... :(


here is the basic answer to your question, why do you lose in the first place or what did you do wrong that you lost? if you determine that, then you know which part of your game or your opponent's game you need to work on ! 8)


I have done exactly the same as you did i bought chess book study the basic principle of winning a game is to control the center but i still keep on loosing one problem that i had is that i tried to immitate the moves that i've read on the book and somehow my opponent makes a different move then i started to panic, so it didnt turn out the way i want it nor read on the book then i dont know what's next.
so what i did, is put the book aside and stayed on the basic principles, books are really good but people thinks differently.
then what i did is immagine the game as a medieval war,
pawns as foot soldier (sometimes i see it as a wall)
knight as a knight
bishop as an archer
so on and so fort depends on your immagination.anyway
its how you lay your foundation how you support your foundation then getting creative
as they say theres more into it than just moves it involves a lot of things that makes it more challenging it involves on how your opponents think,sometimes you look at them on the eye ,sometime their facial body movement, etc.etc.
just my 2 cents..........
how your opponents look on the board

_________________
...he can do everything that's what make him so complicated..
...feet hands uppercuts jab body punches head movements foot work everything he got it all.
-emmanuel steward-


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:15 am 
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To All Chess addicts, Please try to visit Worlchesslive.com its new and cool site to play live chess... :D


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 8:01 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2003 7:21 am
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MITZPUNCHER wrote:
I dont know whats wrong with me. I read chess books, read chess games on the web and even analyze it. Y i cant improve my game? Many ordinary chess players can beat me. Can you help me how to improve my game? I do have lots of patience in fact i sometime play the game in hours.Will u give a hint what to do? What would i do first and what would i need to improve. I love chess game but it seems that the game i love doesnt like me.huh... :(


first you need to identify your weakness, do you always commit a tactical blunder? meaning you always lose a material unintentionally? if that's the case, try to hone your tactical skills by solving chess puzzles and try to study tactical themes like, the fork, skewers, double attacks, etc.., solving chess problem everyday is a good way to improve your tactical skills, good books on tactics are, "chess tactics for champions" by gm susan polgar, and "winning chess tactics" by gm yasser seirawan,

if your weakness is strategic skills, meaning you have a difficulty of finding a good plan, then you should try to read a good book that teaches chess strategy, good books on chess strategy is "the amateurs mind" by siliman, and "winning chess strategy" by gm yasser seirawan

it's frustrating to have outplayed your opponent in the opening and middle game only to allow him to escape with a draw in the endgame, so if your weakness is the endgame play, a good book that will help you improve your endgame play is "chess endings essential knowledge by gm yuri averbakh

chess is not an easy sport, if you want to be a good player that always win games, you should improve all the facet of your game, you should improve your tactical, strategic, endgame and opening skills, don't be afraid to lose games, just learn from your loses, also don't be dogmatic about chess principles, if there's a move that will break a common chess principle but will give you a better advantage then play it


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 6:38 am 
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just by reading the link below your chess strength will increase, a really nice read it will make your opponent shiver in fear on your new profound strength :mrgreen:

chess planning


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2008 7:54 am 
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Here are links for those who does not know how to play chess, but wants to learn it

http://www.intuitor.com/chess/

http://chess.about.com/od/beginners/Chess_for_Beginners_Learn_to_Play.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:59 am 
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instructive lessons about chess planning


lessons


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 10:45 am 
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Here is a famous page from the famous book of the legendaryformer world champion mikhail tal, which is called, 'The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal"

The Hippopotamus Game
In his excellent autobiography Mikhail Tal told an entertaining story of what does a chessplayer think when he plays:

"JOURNALIST. It's perhaps not convenient to interrupt at such a culminating moment, but I would, nevertheless, like to know whether extraneous thoughts ever enter your head during a game?

CHESS PLAYER. Oh yes! For instance, I will never forget my game with Grandmaster Vasyukov in one of the USSR Championships. We reached a very complicated position where I was intending to sacrifice a knight. The sacrifice was not altogher obvious, and there was a large number of possible variations, but when I conscientiously began to work through them, I found, to my horror, that nothing would come of it. Ideas piled up one after another. I would transport a subtle reply by my opponent, which worked in one case, to another situation where it would naturally prove to be quite useless. As a result my head became filled with a completely chaotic pile of all sorts of moves, and the famous 'tree of the variations', from which the trainers recommend that you cut off the small branches, in this case spread with unbelieavable rapidity.

And then suddenly, for some reason, I remembered the classic couplet by Korney Ivanovich Chukovsky:

Oh, what a difficult job it was
To drag out of the march the hippopotamus.

I don't know from what associations the hippopotamus got onto the chess board, but althoug the spectators were convinced that I was continuing to study the position, I, despite my humanitarian education, was trying at this time to work out: just how would you drag a hippopotamus out of the marsh? I remember how jacks figured in my thoughts, as well as levers, helicopters, and even a rope ladder. After a lenghty consideration I admitted defeat as an engineer, and thought spitefully:"Well, let it drown!" And suddenly the hippopotamus disappeared. Went off from the chess board just as he had come on. Of his own accord! And straightaway the position did not appear to be so complicated. Now I somehow realized that it was not possible to calculate all the variations, and that the knight sacrifice was, by its very nature, purely intuitive. And since it promised and interesting game, I could not refrain from making it.

And the following day, it was with pleasure that I read in the paper how Mikhail Tal, after carefully thinking over the position for 40 minutes, made an accurately- calculated piece sacrifice..."

[Event "?"]
[Site "Kiev ch-SU"]
[Date "1964.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tal,Mikhail"]
[Black "Vasiukov,Evgeny"]
[Result "1-0"]
[NIC "CK 8.2"]

1. e2-e4 c7-c6 2. Nb1-c3 d7-d5 3. d2-d4 d5xe4 4. Nc3xe4 Nb8-d7 5. Ng1-f3
Ng8-f6 6. Ne4-g3 e7-e6 7. Bf1-d3 c6-c5 8. O-O c5xd4 9. Nf3xd4 Bf8-c5
10. Nd4-f3 O-O 11. Qd1-e2 b7-b6 12. Bc1-f4 Bc8-b7 13. Ra1-d1 Nf6-d5
14. Bf4-g5 Qd8-c7 15. Ng3-h5 Kg8-h8 16. Bd3-e4 f7-f6 17. Bg5-h4 Bc5-d6
18. c2-c4 Bb7-a6 19. Nh5xg7 Kh8xg7 20. Nf3-d4 Nd7-c5 21. Qe2-g4 Kg7-h8
22. Nd4xe6 Nc5xe6 23. Qg4xe6 Ra8-e8 24. Qe6xd5 Bd6xh2 25. Kg1-h1 Qc7-f4
26. Qd5-h5 Qf4xe4 27. Rf1-e1 Qe4-g6 28. Qh5xg6 h7xg6 29. Bh4xf6 Kh8-g8
30. Re1xe8 Rf8xe8 31. Kh1xh2 Ba6xc4 32. Rd1-d7 Re8-e6 33. Bf6-c3 Bc4xa2
34. Rd7xa7 Ba2-c4 35. Kh2-g3 Bc4-d5 36. f2-f3 Kg8-f8 37. Bc3-d4 b6-b5
38. Kg3-f4 Bd5-c4 39. Kf4-g5 Kf8-e8 40. Ra7-a8 Ke8-f7 41. Ra8-a7 Kf7-e8
42. b2-b4 Bc4-d5 43. Ra7-a3 Ke8-f7 44. g2-g4 Re6-e2 45. Bd4-c5 Re2-e5
46. Kg5-h6 Re5-e6 47. Ra3-d3 Bd5-c6 48. Rd3-d8 Re6-e8 49. Rd8-d4 Re8-e6
50. f3-f4 Kf7-e8 51. Kh6-g7 Bc6-e4 52. Bc5-b6 Be4-f3 53. Rd4-d8 Ke8-e7
54. Rd8-d3 Bf3-e2 55. Bb6-d8 Ke7-e8 56. Rd3-d2 Re6-e3 57. Bd8-g5 Be2-d3
58. f4-f5

1-0


the link


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 2:25 pm 
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Good post by a member on another forum



Miscellaneous musings from various GM’s and chess instructors:

If the student doesn't know how to think correctly he will never be able to play very good chess. Even if he studies much theory, reads many chess books, etc. - WGM Yelena Dembo

In his book The Inner Game of Chess GM Andrew Soltis said: "A popular view among amateurs is that grandmasters ... routinely see 10 moves ahead. There are, of course, examples of this by GMs, but they are relatively rare. Much more common is the kind of calculation that calls for seeing not more than two moves into the future".

Not all masters agree on how one should advance but one of the best ways is playing over lots and lots of games. Not games by weak players and I’d avoid today’s modern GM’s. The reason is that they’ve developed a style (for various reasons) where they are often willing to make positional concessions for practical chances because of modern day fast time controls. Thus their games can be confusing and difficult to understand. I’d recommend games of classical masters. Even better are tournament books. Books of “My Best Games” are just that…best games. Better are games where you see GM’s whipping up on IM’s or IM’s pummeling Masters. You see all the warts that don’t make it into game collections and realize not all games by very strong players are masterpieces worthy of print.

Opening theory is fascinating to lower rated players and Fine’s old Ideas Behind the Chess Openings book is still one of the best to get acquainted with the general ideas. However this is not the way to increase playing strength and will actually hinder your advancement if it’s the main thrust of your study program. FM Pelts and GM Lev Alburt in Comprehensive Chess Course (Vol II): "We beg students who are addicted to opening manuals to remember that most players who spend their time studying theory never reach A-level."

Each opening has (or should have) a basic middlegame strategy behind it and all variations will be designed to carry out that strategy. If a move does not fit into the correct strategy, it’s probably not good. This brings us to the point that in order to really improve you must increase your positional understanding, tactical awareness and endgame knowledge. You have to supplement that by playing games AND playing over hundreds of master games. All this is designed to increase chess knowledge in general. That way when a opponent plays something you are not familiar with you will have some idea of the basic strategy and can judge how his move fits in (or not) and have some idea of where to start looking to plan your own strategy. Chess is not three different parts, opening, middle and end. They are all related so your opening should flow into a middlegame with a clearly defined strategy.

WISDOM FROM GM NIGEL DAVIES:
“Players who understand how to play Isolated Queen's Pawns, Gruenfeld/Catalan positions, Hedgehogs or King's Indian Structures never go through the much reported agonies of club players who attempt to memorize things.The last couple of days I've actually found some time to study some chess, printing out 35 selected games in a particular opening and playing through them with a board and pieces. The next step is to look at some details...
This is why it's good to be a generalist, whereby you have more patterns to draw on in any new situations and then draw multiple comparisons. People are often surprised by my ignorance of variations ... but the same is true of many GMs, IMs and just good club players. But if you have a good knowledge of various middlegame positions you will know what to go for and should be able to position your pieces well in the opening.

On the other hand the mnemonic approach to chess openings will leave a player disorientated as soon as something he hasn't studied comes along. And this ALWAYS happens, either when your opponent varies from your line through ignorance or because he cooperates to the VERY END.”

Studying openings in depth is overrated by lower rated players. Opening knowledge will not be of any benefit if your middle and endgame play is weak. Knowledge of opening theory may only mean the difference between an equal position and a slight advantage or disadvantage unless you are a master.

Most players don’t know why they lost a particular game. They blame a blunder, missing a move by their opponent or any of a hundred excuses. Usually there is a whole list of reasons: attitude, bad strategy, missed tactics, but often it’s failure to understand the basics. Most books are about openings. The reason is because most players are not interested in anything else. They are not interested in how to plan or how masters calculate, or endgame theory. Despite their claims most players are simply in a hurry to win a quick game and move on to another. Just look on any Internet site and it’s not unusual to see players with a hundred or more games going at the same time. How can one play that many games at one time and devote sufficient time to each individual game to play it well? They are the same players who buy opening books that promise them they will win more games if they play a particular opening. They will study tactics until they can do the exercises fast and accurately then complain because they still miss them in their own games.

Most players think that they already know chess basics, so why spend the time learning them again. But Jeremy Silman has discovered most players fail miserly and lack the understanding of basic fundamentals. They have problems with a lack of understanding concerning the purpose of the opening, no knowledge of planning and the thinking processes, no understanding of elementary endings. Nor do they understand how the opening, middle game and ending are related.


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 7:13 am 
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How to Improve Your ability to Concentrate and Focus in just 15 minutes a day by Prashant Waikar



What is Chess? Is it a board game? Is it a battle fought out on 64 squares? No. These are just descriptions of the game. They do not tell you what Chess ultimately is.

Chess is a mind game between 2 people. All your knowledge of the game, the skills you've learnt and the experience you've gained from past tournaments and matches makes up just half of the mind game. The other half comes from elsewhere.

This other half is what will give you the extra edge over your opponent. I'm sure you're aware of it. But mastering it is a totally different matter. And today's article is about that.

Concentration and focus. The ability to do this is what seperates the really successful Chess players from the mediocre ones. In other words thise who win tournaments consistently are seperated from those who win trophies maybe once out of every 5 tournaments by the ability to focus and concentrate.

Mastering this is by no means easy. But nevertheless, it's something which you must master. Notice I used the word must instead of should. This itself signifies the importance of what I am talking about.

So how do you go about mastering the ability to concentrate and focus at will?

Meditation. I'm sure you are aware of what meditation is, so I won't talk about the definition. What I will talk about will be the techniques to meditating. And do apply these techniques, you do not need any special training or any understanding of what meditation really is.

Step One: Go into a quiet room which has no distractions whatsover. By that I mean it should preferably be rid of the TV and Computer, the World's biggest distractions. And for guys, it would be better for the room to be without posters of your favourite supermodels as well.

Step Two: Sit down comfortably on a bed. Close your eyes and place your palms on your thighs.

Step Three: Inhale deeply, hold for a couple of seconds, and then exhale. Repeat this action for 2-3 minutes. This helps to clear the head. Many times, you might find yourself taking a couple of deep breaths when you're nervous. Actually, what you are doing is just clearing your head.

Step Four: After the 3 minutes of deep breathing, inhale and exhale normally for a couple of minutes. Then move on to Step Five.

Step Five: Lie down flat on your back with your arms by your side. Continue to breathe normally. Do this for about 10 minutes. You will find yourself to be feeling very relaxed during this process.

Initially, you would experience a constant flow of thoughts running through your mind. But by consistently, preferably daily, meditating, your mind will clear. And once you have mastered this, you will find that you can focus and concentrate much better in your Chess games.

And on top of that, you will find out that you are winning more matches, and are also living a happier and healthier life.

So there you have it, by just doing this, you can improve your ability to concentrate and focus in just 15 minutes a day!

http://goarticles.com/cgi-bin/showa.cgi?C=500720


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 7:32 am 
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my bad, double post


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 2:12 pm 
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ryan_c wrote:
There are so many things to learn in chess to be good, but I will just post the basic chess maxim, if you based your play on this chess maxim, you will win more games, and it will improve your play.

These general chess principles are not absolutely certain rules, infallible in every case, but rather a sort of general guide. Good players follow them and it takes an expert to know when to deviate from them.

In the opening we should emphasize:

1. Rapid and solid development, avoiding the creation of any permanent weakness. It follows that if through your development you induce your opponent into creating any such weakness, so much the better. The development should aim at the control of the centre, either through immediate possession of it by the pawns, or by the long-range action of the pieces.
2. Do not move the same piece twice before full development has taken place.
3. Avoid loss of material with out full compensation.

In the Middle game:
1. Co-ordinate the action of your pieces.
2. Control of the centre is essential to a successful attack against the king.
3. Direct and violent attacks against the king must be made en masse, with full force, to ensure their success. The opposition must be overcome at all cost; the attack cannot be broken off, because that generally means defeat.
4. 4. Other things being equal, any material gain, no matter how small, means success.
5. Position comes first; material next. Space and time are complementary factors of position.
6. If the game will go to an ending for a decision, consider the type of ending to come before exchanging pieces.

In the ending:
1. Time increases in importance in the endings.
2. Two bishops are better than two knights.
3. A bishop is generally better than a knight, but not always.
4. Rook and bishop are generally better than a rook and knight.
5. Queen and knight are generally better than queen and bishop.
6. Pawns are strongest when in line with each other.
7. When the opponent has a bishop it is generally better to have your pawns on squares of the same colour as your opponent’s bishop. Whenever you have bishop, weather the opponent also has one or not, keep your pawns on squares of opposite colour to that of your own bishop.
8. In endings of one or two minor pieces the king should generally be marched forward towards the centre of the board.


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 2:19 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 2:04 pm
Posts: 10520
new town wrote:
ryan_c wrote:
MITZPUNCHER wrote:
I dont know whats wrong with me. I read chess books, read chess games on the web and even analyze it. Y i cant improve my game? Many ordinary chess players can beat me. Can you help me how to improve my game? I do have lots of patience in fact i sometime play the game in hours.Will u give a hint what to do? What would i do first and what would i need to improve. I love chess game but it seems that the game i love doesnt like me.huh... :(


If you don't have a coach that will teach you insights about chess, then reading chess books is necessary to improve your game. But there are good and bad chess books. What is the tittle of the books that you have read? To improve your game in chess you need to learn the basic first, meaning the basic themes in opening, middle game and endgame. Once you are familiar with that, buy books that is above beginners level. These are the books that teaches you strategies about weak squares and pawn structures, etc. If you are not a master yet, never memorize so many opening lines, it's better to study the idea behind chess openings. To improve your calculating abilities try to solve chess puzzles. Don't be discourage by your loses, even great players have lost a hundred time before they become great. The important thing is learn from your defeats.


Here are the books that I suggest you buy.


1.How to Reassess your chess by Jeremy Siliman

Can you name at least 3 "Anti-Knight" techniques? (Masters have given me blank looks on this one!) Do you understand "The Minority Attack?" Do you know Silman's, "3 Rules of [the] Combination?" Do you understand the various strengths and weaknesses of the standard pawn structures? Do you know some of the basic imbalances? Do you know the basic properties of each piece, and how they relate to each other ... and the overall position on the board. This book will teach all of that. This is a great book to have.


2. Yasser Seirawan's Winning chess series

His winning books are great and entertaining, Yasser's book are the one that makes me a better player. In fact his books alone are enough to make you a really good player. It's not necessary to buy another chess books until you mastered the lessons in his book. Once you mastered all the lessons in his book and you are still aspiring to become a really very strong players, then reading more advance book will help your game. Books like "Pawn Structure Chess" by Andrew Soltis, "My System" and "Chess Praxis by Nimzowitsch".

2. Logical Chess, Move-By-Move by Irving Chernev, another great book one of the best out there in teaching the basics of chess.


3. Yasser Seirawan's Winning chess series

His winning books are great and entertaining, Yasser's book are the one that makes me a better player. In fact his books alone are enough to make you a really good player. It's not
necessary to buy another chess books until you mastered the lessons in his book. Once you mastered all the lessons in his book and you are still aspiring to become a really very strong players, then reading more advance book will help your game. Books like "Pawn Structure Chess" by Andrew Soltis, and "My System" by Nimzowitsch" are must have books.


How about Walter Korn's "Modern Chess Openings"? I'm told this is considered as "The Chess Players' Bible."



"Tol . . panay ang laro nyo ng chess . . . hindi naman kayo manalo duon sa mga Grade Vi pupils ng Mabini Elementary School :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 5:52 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2003 7:21 am
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Location: philippines
Why the endgame is important
Submitted by yoshtodd on Sun, 06/29/2008 at 10:09pm.



I know that this advice (to study the endgame) is very common, and has probably been covered comprehensively many times elsewhere, but I wanted to share some things I've learned on the subject, mostly for newer players who go "Why bother?"

When I first started playing I began by pretty much memorizing openings that interested me, and also the "rules of thumb" for opening and middle game play. This allowed me to beat people who played moves totally randomly and I felt pretty satisfied. Once the opening was over though, I would start to lose patience and get bored, thinking the game was entirely decided by which side has more material (often if I lost a piece, or even a pawn or two I would instantly resign).

Only recently when I made myself try and focus on the endgame (very tedious at first), did I realize how much of a gap there was in my understanding. People often associate "positional" play as an aspect mainly of the middle game, yet nothing shows you the power of piece position more clear and strong than simply playing out a king and pawn vs king ending. You will see that if your king is just one square off it's optimum place, you will lose, if it's one square over you draw. Same goes for deciding if you win or merely draw.

In the middle and opening there is so much "grey" area... a lot of moves are a matter of preference or more acurately judgement, and when you learn any activity, "good judgement" is usually something you acquire only when you're quite experienced and masterful. In the endgame, there is no way to cover up sloppiness and weaknesses in your play because everything is laid bare. So this gives you great insight into the heart of your game, as the importance and effect of every single move is very evident.

It can be intimidating to look at all the incredible amounts of literature on the endgame. I would suggest you either look up online, or in a book, how to properly play a one pawn endgame from both sides. Learn how, then play it out by yourself putting the pieces in different starting positions. It might take like an hour, but see if it makes you think any differently when you play full games again. At the very least it won't hurt, but hopefully you might reap some reward from it (it is very satisfying especially when you see such a simple study earn you a win, or draw when before you might have despaired that all was lost). It is hard to get motivated to learn the endgame (it was and still is for me anyway), but I strongly urge you to give it a try.


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 Post subject: Re: Basic Chess Strategy
PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2009 6:21 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 8:56 am
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Studying tactics, endgame and middle game themes are necessary to improve in chess.

Below is a good website with lots of chess tactical problems.


http://chesstempo.com/


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