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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 4:06 pm 
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To my fellow Paclanders,

I just want to share some of the ReKnown "CATCHWEIGHTS FIGHTS IN BOXING HISTORY" ! Just feel Free to Add more; You can Add more :D

1. Sugar Ray Leonard vs Donny Lalonde @ 167lbs limit
2. Bernard Hopkins vs Oscar DeLa Hoya @ 155lbs limit
3. Floyd Mayweather Jr vs Juan Manuel Marquez @ 144lbs limit
4. Manny Pacquiao vs Miguel Cotto @ 145lbs limit
5. Juan Diaz vs Paulie Malignaggi @ 138lbs limit
6. Zab Judah vs Jose Armando Santa Cruz @ 143lbs limit

for Info/note:
+Sergio Martinez had said already that he is willing to go down a little bit Only to fight against Floyd MayweatherJr or Manny Pacquiao at 155lbs CatchWeight for his WBC160lbs world title on the line.

+ Andre Berto also had said already that he is willing to go down a little bit Only to fight against Timothy Bradley at 142-143lbs CatchWeight for his WBC147lbs world title on the line.


Mabuhay ang dugong Pilipino, mabuhay ang mga Kawal Pinoy, mabuhay si idol MP.
GOD bless us all !!!

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Acts 20:35 "It is more blessed to give than to recieve."
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 24, 2010 7:25 am 
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As what reported/posted from FanHouse.com a minute ago, re-DBE promoter and boss Lou DiBella said that his fighter Sergio "maravilla" Martinez likes Fight against Miguel Cotto and Willing to Kill Himself to reach 155lbs "CatchWeight" fight.

to read the full story, link:
http://boxing.fanhouse.com/2010/07/23/l ... -celestin/ by Lem Satterfield dated 1305H 23July 2010 ET

FanHouse: What would you like to see next for Sergio Martinez?

L.DiBella: I would love to see [ex-world champion] Antonio Margarito for him. We would have done [WBA champ] Felix Sturm at 160, but Felix Sturm had no desire to take that fight, and he would have gotten his a** kicked. But that would have been a unification.

[WBA junior middleweight champ] Miguel Cotto at 155 pounds. A mega fight, Sergio Would HURT HimSelf to GO DOWN to 155 for. IF Paul Williams is Going to Happen, then it's Going to have to Happen at 160.

That's Sergio's comfortable weight now, and that's where he's the Linnear champion.
And, by the way, he is a Middleweight NOW because HE's Bulked his Body Up.

FanHouse: Espcially after going up to middleweight, the highest weight he's been at, and dethroning Kelly Pavlik?

L.DiBella: Yeah, I mean, it's not like he took any kind of a normal fight in between. He had to fight above his weight class and become a middleweight and go up to 160 poundsI Mean,
YEAH, For the RIGHT Fight, HE'LL KILL HIMSELF To MaKe 155 pounds. But Sergio Martinez is NOT Any longer a TRUE, 154-pounder. Right Now, his Body is More of a MIDDLEWeight Body.

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Acts 20:35 "It is more blessed to give than to recieve."
Philippians 4:13"I can do all things through CHRIST which strengtheneth me."


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 24, 2010 7:25 am 
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As what reported/posted from FanHouse.com a minute ago, re- DBE boss/promoter Lou DiBella said that his fighter Celestino Caballero Would fight any one even in a CatchWeight fight.

to read the full story, link:
http://boxing.fanhouse.com/2010/07/23/l ... -celestin/ by Lem Satterfield dated 1305H 23July 2010 ET

FanHouse: Who would you like to see Caballero fight in his next couple of fights if you could line up opponents for him?

DiBella: Any champion at 126, or any champion at 130, and, You Know IF WE Could DO A "CATCHWEIGHT" Above 122 because Caballero CaN'T make 122, Then, AnyBody at 122. So I'm going out there and saying that I have a pound-for-pound fighter, and he will fight anyone.

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Acts 20:35 "It is more blessed to give than to recieve."
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 1:35 pm 
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Let's stop for while and revisit the boxing history. These fighters say "NO PROBLEM" with catchweights.

"Both fighters take risks in catchweight bouts".

Kelly Pavlik's rematch with Jermain Taylor marks the return of catchweight bouts -- fights in which the boxers meet at an agreed weight. Graham Houston takes a look at some of the more prominent catchweight matches in boxing history.Email Print

Comments By Graham Houston
Special to ESPN.com
Archive

Sometimes, fights are arranged at a catchweight out of necessity and other times -- as was the case with Mayorga, right, and Vargas -- they're arranged for convenience purposes.

Saturday's Kelly Pavlik-Jermain Taylor rematch at 166 pounds is part of a recent revival of bouts made at catchweight -- traditionally when boxers in different weight divisions meet in the middle.

In the days when there were just eight weight divisions, catchweight bouts were commonplace.

Each boxer in such a fight was seen as taking a risk.

The smaller fighter would hope that his opponent might weaken himself making the agreed weight. For the bigger man, the gamble would be whether he could get down to the lighter weight and remain strong.

Here is a look, in chronological order, at 12 catchweight contests.

Joe Gans D20 Joe Walcott -- San Francisco, Sept. 30, 1904

Lightweight champion Joe Gans was the master boxer while welterweight champion Joe Walcott was an aggressive fighter whose nickname, The Barbados Demon, had been well-earned.

The shorter, much heavier-set Walcott was required to make 138 pounds at an unusual ringside weigh-in and according to the San Francisco Bulletin "saved his forfeit money by a very slight fraction" although the actual weights were not reported.

There were hints that the boxers might not go all out, but referee Jack Welch visited both men and reassuringly told the Bulletin: "I think the contest will be the best and squarest ever pulled off in San Francisco."

Welch was not far wrong, with the Bulletin reporting: "It was a great fight. Gans was the clever ring mechanic. Walcott was the same old Barbadoes [sic] hurricane. He carried the fight to Gans from the start and didn't seem to mind the facers that would either have slowed up the average fighter or put him out of commission."

When Welch signaled a draw the crowd booed, believing that Gans had won. Walcott, the Bulletin reported, was "tickled to death with the verdict and sprang forward and shook the referee's hand."

Jimmy McLarnin W10 Pancho Villa -- Emeryville, Calif., July 4, 1925

Belfast-born, Canadian-raised Jimmy McLarnin was an up-and-coming featherweight prospect when he faced flyweight champion Pancho Villa in a catchweight bout. Filipino Villa had the experience, but the 18-year-old McLarnin had youth and physical advantages in his favor. McLarnin weighed 122 pounds to Villa's 114 according to the Vancouver Sun (although the online source BoxRec.com lists each man as one pound lighter).

Boxing enthusiasts thought that Villa would win "not so much because of his punching ability or ruggedness but because of his experience," the Sun reported. But McLarnin clearly outscored Villa, with the Sun reporting: "The dark-haired, short-armed fighting demon from the Philippines, the boss of the flyweights, could not penetrate the McLarnin defense. Jimmy smiled through the 10 rounds, fought carefully and didn't let the champion gain an advantage."

Tragically, Villa died in hospital in San Francisco eight days later. It transpired that Villa had been suffering from an infected jaw and had a wisdom tooth removed the night before the fight. He refused to pull out of the fight, not wishing the promoter to suffer financial hardship. The Sun reported that Villa apparently went into the ring with the "jaw nerves deadened by a drug to kill the pain." After the fight, the infection spread. Doctors performed immediate jaw surgery after Villa had been rushed to hospital but he "failed to rally from the effects of the operation."

Henry Armstrong TKO end of 6 Lew Jenkins -- Polo Grounds, N.Y., July 17, 1940

Welterweight champion Henry Armstrong was obliged to weigh in seven pounds under the division limit for his scheduled 12-rounder with lightweight champion Lew Jenkins. This was no problem for Armstrong, a featherweight champion who was small for a welterweight. Armstrong came in at 139 pounds, while Jenkins was just a half-pound over the lightweight limit of 135.

The fight held intrigue because Jenkins, from Sweetwater, Texas, was known to be a terrific hitter. New York Times columnist John Kieran was one of many who felt that Jenkins's big punch gave him a chance. "If he can land that punch on a dodging target like Armstrong he may do well for himself," Kieran opined in a prefight story.

Jenkins did indeed do damage. Joseph P. Dawson reported in The New York Times that Armstrong's left eye was swollen almost shut while his right eye "dripped a blinding flow of blood" after a desperation left hook opened an old cut. Armstrong was winning the fight, though. He took command from the fourth round and Jenkins was down seven times, unable to hold the stronger, superior fighter in Armstrong. Referee Arthur Donovan stopped the fight at the end of the sixth as Jenkins "writhed and groaned on his stool" in the words of reporter Dawson.

Emile Griffith TKO9 Dave Charnley -- London, Dec. 1, 1964

Dave Charnley, a world-class British lightweight of the 1950s and early '60s, was a tough, compact southpaw who could punch hard at 135 pounds. But he was in far over his head when he fought the welterweight champion, Emile Griffith, in a 10-round non-title bout at Wembley indoor arena in northwest London.

Griffith had just soundly beaten the Welsh southpaw Brian Curvis in a title fight in London. The Charnley fight was officially made at a weight of 148 pounds -- a pound over the welterweight limit -- but a private agreement between the parties stipulated that Griffith could not scale more than 145 pounds at the weigh-in on the day of the fight. Griffith looked big for the 147-pound division with his wide-shouldered physique, still making 145 pounds was not a problem for him.

Griffith overpowered Charnley and the referee called a halt to the bout after the smaller man got up from a knockdown. As Britain's The Times newspaper gloomily reported: "Charnley was never in with much of a chance against the champion of the division above him."

Charnley fought two other welterweights at a catchweight, losing a disputed decision against Brian Curvis, whom he knocked down, and stopping the European champion of the time, London's Peter Waterman, in the fifth round, although Waterman was coming to the end of his career.

Ray Leonard TKO9 Donny Lalonde -- Las Vegas, Nov. 7, 1988

There wasn't a big enough size advantage to compensate the gulf in talent between Lalonde, left, and Leonard.Sugar Ray Leonard won two titles in one night when he stopped Donny Lalonde -- capturing the Canadian's WBC light heavyweight title while also winning the inaugural WBC super middleweight belt.

Due to the super middle title being at stake, Lalonde was required to weigh no more than 168 pounds. He talked a great fight, referring to the 32-year-old Leonard as an "old, fat welterweight." While Lalonde fought well early, even scoring a knockdown, Sugar Ray proved to be a different class in terms of talent.

When the boxers weighed in on the morning of the fight, Leonard's weight was announced as 165 pounds, two pounds lighter than Lalonde. He said in the postfight press conference, however, that his true weight was 159-and-a-half pounds. Leonard, who had weighed in wearing a track suit, said he had secretly placed weights in each pocket.

Terry Norris TKO4 Meldrick Taylor-- Las Vegas, May 9, 1992

Welterweight champion Meldrick Taylor faced a daunting task against Terry Norris, the champion at junior middleweight, but his camp negotiated a weight limit of 150-and-a-half pounds. This was three-and-a-half pounds inside the weight limit for Norris' division. The hope was that this would level the playing field.

Fighting at a catchweight of 150-and-a-half pounds wasn't enough to tip the scales in favor of Taylor, left.The clash of champions was keenly anticipated, with columnist Royce Feour writing in the Las Vegas Review-Journal: "The Norris-Taylor bout is one of the most ideal matchups that can be made in boxing today."

Once the fight started, though, the physical advantages of Norris, who weighed 149 pounds, quickly became apparent. Taylor won the first round on two judges' cards but was then overpowered. As I reported from ringside for Boxing Monthly: "Taylor has fast hands, but he seemed physically and psychologically shaken by the rapidity of Norris's punching -- and Norris was hitting far harder."

Paulie Ayala W12 Johnny Tapia -- Las Vegas, Oct. 7, 2000

Ayala, right, fought Tapia at 124 pounds after beating the Albuquerque native at bantamweight one year before.Paulie Ayala and Johnny Tapia had staged a sizzling 12-round battle in the bantamweight division in June 1999. Although Ayala won a unanimous decision -- in a big upset -- there were many who disagreed with the verdict. Among them, of course, was the emotional Tapia, who later told me in a telephone interview that he was convinced he had won, "down as far as you can go in my heart."

Tapia had moved up to the featherweight division and Ayala was still a 118-pounder. The two agreed to meet at 124 pounds. Tapia's trainer for the bout, Jesse Reid, told me over the phone before the fight that he thought his man would be "super strong" coming down in weight to 124. But Ayala's trainer, Henry Mendez, said in a phone interview: "I don't think the little extra weight will make much difference. Paulie's very strong, even though he's a little man."

The rematch was just as good as the first bout, maybe better. Once again, Ayala won by unanimous decision, but, much like the previous fight, the decision was disputed. Jesse Reid angrily proclaimed that Tapia had given Ayala a boxing lesson, but it looked desperately close. As I reported from ringside for Boxing Monthly: "Tapia had many good moments, but so did Ayala. Just when you thought one man was getting on top, so the other came back."

Bernard Hopkins KO9 Oscar De La Hoya -- Las Vegas, Sept. 18, 2004

Middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins was so eager to make the biggest purse of his career against Oscar De La Hoya that he was willing to give a little in negotiations. Most significant, was his agreeing to the Golden Boy's stipulation that the match be made at a catchweight of 158 pounds, two pounds inside the middleweight limit. In the event, Hopkins came in at the surpassingly light weight of 156 pounds.

If De La Hoya hoped that reducing weight would affect Hopkins's stamina, he got it wrong. As I reported from ringside for Boxing Monthly: "As he gained momentum, Hopkins actually appeared faster than De La Hoya, and coming out for the ninth, the Executioner from Philadelphia looked as if he could keep going strong for many more rounds than the mere four that remained."

Hopkins was to box in another catchweights bout when, as light heavyweight champion, he agreed to meet leading middleweight Winky Wright at a weight of 170 pounds on July 7, 2007, at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. Hopkins carried the weight far better than a soft-looking Wright and dominated the last four rounds to win a unanimous decision.

Jose Luis Castillo KO4 Diego Corrales -- Las Vegas, Oct. 8, 2005

All of the boxing world eagerly awaited the lightweight championship rematch between Jose Luis Castillo and Diego Corrales after their sensational fight four months earlier, won by Corrales in the 10th round.

Castillo, however, failed to make the 135-pound limit for the return fight. After weighing in three times, he was still three-and-a-half pounds overweight. He was fined $120,000 -- 10 percent of his purse -- by the Nevada State Athletic Commission. The fighters' camps huddled to try to find a way to salvage the fight. Finally, it was agreed that Corrales would go through with the scheduled 12-rounder on the understanding that Castillo weighed no more than 147 pounds at a special, Nevada commission-supervised weigh-in at 3 p.m. on fight day.

A revitalized Castillo, left, enjoyed an enormous weight advantage after a catchweight was negotiated to salvage his fight with Corrales.Castillo made the weight, and the fight was on -- except that now it was a catchweight bout, with the officially announced weights being 139-and-a-half pounds for Castillo, 135 pounds for Corrales.

The Corrales camp went into the fight believing it had done all it could to make an equal fight, but as I reported from ringside for Boxing Monthly: "The difference in the physical strength, vitality and power of the two men once the fight started was soon evident."

A crunching left hook finished Corrales in the fourth round, but the late warrior told the postfight press conference: "I'm not going to muck up his win by even entertaining the thought that he had an unfair advantage. Whether he made the weight or not is not the point. He came out there and did a good job today."

A rubber match was cancelled after the weigh-in when Castillo again could not make the lightweight limit. This time the Corrales side walked away.

Amazingly, it was Corrales who failed to make weight for a lightweight title bout against old rival Joel Casamayor on Oct. 7, 2006. The bout, at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, went ahead at catchweights, with Casamayor eking out a split decision over a sluggish Corrales.

Henry Maske W12 Virgil Hill -- Munich, March 31, 2007

Maske, right, took Hill out of his comfort zone of 200 pounds to avenge a previous loss.Henry Maske waited 10 years before stepping into the ring for a rematch with Virgil Hill, who had handed him his only professional defeat.

Their first fight had been at light heavyweight. Hill was now a 200-pound cruiserweight. Maske negotiated the return fight at a catchweight of 190 pounds.

Although Maske had not boxed in a decade, he trained long and hard and sharpened up his skills with two private bouts -- real fights to which the public and press were not invited. In the fight between two 43-year-olds, Maske looked the stronger man, clearly outpointing Hill to the great delight of the crowd.

Ricardo Mayorga W12 Fernando Vargas -- Los Angeles, Nov. 23, 2007

Fernando Vargas wanted to leave boxing with a win after having been knocked out by Sugar Shane Mosley. He weighed 154 pounds for the Mosley fight but, as was his tendency, Vargas packed on the pounds when out of training. The fight with Ricardo Mayorga, a junior middleweight, was originally made at 162 pounds before the limit was upped to 164 pounds. Vargas looked muscled at the weigh-in, but he seemed bloated by the time he got into the ring and Mayorga won a majority decision.

Roy Jones Jr. W12 Felix Trinidad -- New York City, Jan. 19, 2008

Although Roy Jones Jr. had been boxing as a light heavyweight, he agreed to meet middleweight Felix Trinidad at the middle-of-the-road weight of 170 pounds. Jones, weighing his lightest in six years, looked like the much bigger, stronger man as he dominated the last eight rounds, scoring two knockdowns on his way to a unanimous decision.

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/boxing ... id=3238297

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Acts 20:35 "It is more blessed to give than to recieve."
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 2:11 pm 
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Resolved Question Report Abuse Why catchweight being allowed in boxing? Why are they allowing it if it is being objected by the boxing fan? Serious response please. 18 hours ago Best Answer - Chosen by Asker As HT said, money is the biggest issue, and of course it depends on what the fans wants. Catchweight existed since the early 1900 s. You had Pancho Villa vs Jimmy McLarnin fight at a catchweight of 114 in 1925 and from there there has been many title fights fought at catchweights. Elite fighters from Oscar De La Hoya, Felix Trinidad, Sugar Ray leonard, Henry Armstrong, Bernard Hopkins, Roy Jones Jr. Joe Gans, Emile Griffith, Pernell Whitaker, and Julio Cesar Chavez have all fought at catchweights for title fights. To fully answer your question, catchweight is allowed because it is legal and it is part of boxing 100 plus years of tradition. It is a written rule that catchweight is legal as long as both sides agree on it. All major governing bodies from Ring, WBA, WBO, IBF, or WBC all sanctions catchweight in title fights. Most fans of boxing today are new and most were not aware that some of the all time greats have fought on catchweights so it brings a tremendous dislike for fans when they hear catchweights because they are not fully aware that it is a boxing tradition and is nothing new. It is more intertwined with the information and details known by fans about boxing history. Many old school boxing fans are use to seeing catchweights but new fans are not so they critciize catchweight bouts. It all depends on what type of fans you have in other words.


http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index ... 031AAldlm1

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:43 am 
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Latest "CatchWeight" fight as of 18September 2010!

Saul "canelo" Alvarez vs Carlos "tata" Baldomir- CatchWeight at 150lbs for the
WBC Jr.Middleweight Silver Championship belt.

Baldomir weighed in at 153.4lbs, while Alvarez weighed in at 150.5lbs.
link: http://www.boxingscene.com/?m=show&id=31064 by Michael Marley dated 18September 2010


Also, the fight between; Erik "el terrible" Morales vs Willie Limond last 09/11/2010 was CatchWeight at 143lbs for the
WBC Welterweight Silver Championship belt and the WBC International Welterweight title belt.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:20 am 
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With the proliferation of so many belts in addition to title governing bodies and fights being fought at catchweights, titles are losing their significance and come cheaper by the dozen. Don't forget the WBC diamond belt. Maybe next time they'll come up with the bronze belt, the sapphire belt, etc. Might as well make every fight a title fight so the body can charge sanctioning fees.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:33 am 
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Emmanuel53 wrote:
With the proliferation of so many belts in addition to title governing bodies and fights being fought at catchweights, titles are losing their significance and come cheaper by the dozen. Don't forget the WBC diamond belt. Maybe next time they'll come up with the bronze belt, the sapphire belt, etc. Might as well make every fight a title fight so the body can charge sanctioning fees.

+Big possibility bro. :)
like the WBA, they have: 1.) regular champion, 2.) Interim champion, 3.) Super champion.
Now, example as for the case of Yuriorkis Gamboa- (current Unified WBA/IBF 126lbs world champion) he is now the "super champion" BUT Chris John of Indonesia was the "super champion" too even though he only holds that single (1) belt, the WBA 126lbs. :?

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:17 am 
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die hard!!! wrote:
Emmanuel53 wrote:
With the proliferation of so many belts in addition to title governing bodies and fights being fought at catchweights, titles are losing their significance and come cheaper by the dozen. Don't forget the WBC diamond belt. Maybe next time they'll come up with the bronze belt, the sapphire belt, etc. Might as well make every fight a title fight so the body can charge sanctioning fees.

+Big possibility bro. :)
like the WBA, they have: 1.) regular champion, 2.) Interim champion, 3.) Super champion.
Now, example as for the case of Yuriorkis Gamboa- (current Unified WBA/IBF 126lbs world champion) he is now the "super champion" BUT Chris John of Indonesia was the "super champion" too even though he only holds that single (1) belt, the WBA 126lbs. :?



This is getting me dizzy! It's a sad thing that these current belts are
rapidly losing their value. I think it's okay to have these "catchweights"
back then when there were only 8 weight category, But now that they've
found a way to reach or patch things up about the wide weight differences,
by putting in "in-between" weight categories like "super" or "junior"
to compensate for the huge weight gap, "catchweights" shouldn't be allowed
in my opinion. Just fight on your own weight preference and let your opponent
weigh the full limit of a weight class that you wanna jump into.

That's what I call "Whole-Hearted Guts!" :thor:


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:26 am 
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onizuka_sensei wrote:
die hard!!! wrote:
Emmanuel53 wrote:
With the proliferation of so many belts in addition to title governing bodies and fights being fought at catchweights, titles are losing their significance and come cheaper by the dozen. Don't forget the WBC diamond belt. Maybe next time they'll come up with the bronze belt, the sapphire belt, etc. Might as well make every fight a title fight so the body can charge sanctioning fees.

+Big possibility bro. :)
like the WBA, they have: 1.) regular champion, 2.) Interim champion, 3.) Super champion.
Now, example as for the case of Yuriorkis Gamboa- (current Unified WBA/IBF 126lbs world champion) he is now the "super champion" BUT Chris John of Indonesia was the "super champion" too even though he only holds that single (1) belt, the WBA 126lbs. :?



This is getting me dizzy! It's a sad thing that these current belts are
rapidly losing their value. I think it's okay to have these "catchweights"
back then when there were only 8 weight category, But now that they've
found a way to reach or patch things up about the wide weight differences,
by putting in "in-between" weight categories like "super" or "junior"
to compensate for the huge weight gap, "catchweights" shouldn't be allowed
in my opinion. Just fight on your own weight preference and let your opponent
weigh the full limit of a weight class that you wanna jump into.

That's what I call "Whole-Hearted Guts!" :thor:

+Thanks for the good share bro. :D

_________________
Matthew 28:20"I am with you always, even unto the end of the world."
Acts 20:35 "It is more blessed to give than to recieve."
Philippians 4:13"I can do all things through CHRIST which strengtheneth me."


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:38 am 
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onizuka_sensei wrote:
This is getting me dizzy! It's a sad thing that these current belts are
rapidly losing their value. I think it's okay to have these "catchweights"
back then when there were only 8 weight category, But now that they've
found a way to reach or patch things up about the wide weight differences,
by putting in "in-between" weight categories like "super" or "junior"
to compensate for the huge weight gap, "catchweights" shouldn't be allowed
in my opinion. Just fight on your own weight preference and let your opponent
weigh the full limit of a weight class that you wanna jump into.

That's what I call "Whole-Hearted Guts!" :thor:

die hard!!! wrote:
+Thanks for the good share bro. :D


Np bro! Dont get me wrong Im pro Pacquiao but these catchweights might
have an effect on his reign. Once is okay but another? I dont know.. :pirate:


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 8:03 am 
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onizuka_sensei wrote:
onizuka_sensei wrote:
This is getting me dizzy! It's a sad thing that these current belts are
rapidly losing their value. I think it's okay to have these "catchweights"
back then when there were only 8 weight category, But now that they've
found a way to reach or patch things up about the wide weight differences,
by putting in "in-between" weight categories like "super" or "junior"
to compensate for the huge weight gap, "catchweights" shouldn't be allowed
in my opinion. Just fight on your own weight preference and let your opponent
weigh the full limit of a weight class that you wanna jump into.

That's what I call "Whole-Hearted Guts!" :thor:

die hard!!! wrote:
+Thanks for the good share bro. :D


Np bro! Dont get me wrong Im pro Pacquiao but these catchweights might
have an effect on his reign. Once is okay but another? I dont know.. :pirate:

+It's okay bro, you have a good point. :D

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Acts 20:35 "It is more blessed to give than to recieve."
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 8:44 am 
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I see nothing wrong in catchweights. Without it, a lot of exciting match-ups won't happen. A lot of boxers already tried going up in weight but failed. It's just that Pacman is Jordan in Boxing, and he attracts new people who doesn't know sh*t in boxing, and of course he gets all critics from them. In my opinion people nowadays just watched too much wrestling or played to0 much Fight Night (Boxing Game). These are all fakes! Let's get back to reality, fighting catchweights, either going up or down weight is no walk in the park! 8)

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 3:51 pm 
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martin5and7 wrote:
I see nothing wrong in catchweights. Without it, a lot of exciting match-ups won't happen. A lot of boxers already tried going up in weight but failed. It's just that Pacman is Jordan in Boxing, and he attracts new people who doesn't know sh*t in boxing, and of course he gets all critics from them. In my opinion people nowadays just watched too much wrestling or played to0 much Fight Night (Boxing Game). These are all fakes! Let's get back to reality, fighting catchweights, either going up or down weight is no walk in the park! 8)


+Thanks for your good share bro, very well said. :D

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:04 am 
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Response from: page 25 of: Will Manny win over Margo enhance his Legacy?
viewtopic.php?f=104&t=177279&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=360

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To fellow Paclanders
A recently edited definition of a catchweight is printed below. The highlighted portions are our own contributions. I really hope it reflects the views of the majority of those who participated or read the discussions in this forum. This effort is to clarify that a title won on a catchweight is not only as legitimate but more courageous (for the smaller fighter) than a traditional title when fighters were weighed-in the day of the fight (meaning both have almost the same weight on fight time). It is also to highlight the fact that some fighters are cheating the weights by not coming prepared to pass a weigh-in, getting penalized and come at a huge weight advantage on fight night. In addition to the Gatti-Gamache mismatch we have the Jose Luis Castillo vs Diego Corrales and Mayweather vs Marquez bouts. Again I hope we all support a campaign to clarify these issues on catchweights. Thank you.

Catch weight
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A catch weight is a term used in combat sports such as boxing and mixed martial arts to describe a weight limit for a fight that does not fall in line with the traditional limits for weight classes. In boxing, a catch-weight is negotiated to “level the playing field” when the weigh-ins are conducted a day before the fight.

Explanation

Strictly speaking, a catch-weight in boxing is used to describe a weight limit for a fight that does not fall in line with the limits for the expanded weight classes; after the traditional rules of “day of” fight were changed to “day before” fight weigh-ins and after the traditional 8 weight divisions were expanded to 17 weight classes.

An agreed weight was used to describe a catch-weight in the traditional way, when only eight (8) division limits existed and all weigh-ins were done “day or hours” before the fight. A historical marker that points to when “day of” fight ended is the advent of television. In boxing and in Muhammad Ali’s time, they started televising the weigh-in proceedings to promote fights necessitating a “day before” fight weigh-in.

The difference between a boxing catch-weight and an MMA catch-weight is the time when the fighters are weighed in. In boxing, the weigh-ins are made a “day before” the fight so that the catch-weight limit and specific penalties are already agreed before the weigh-ins. In MMA, the weigh-ins are made “night of” the fights so that the catch-weight limit and penalties are only agreed after the weigh-ins.

With modern conditioning and training methods, today’s fighters are able to cut weight for a “day before” fight weigh-in and regain the same weight on “day of” the fight. Reference: How to Cut and Make Weight – Martin Rooney. [1]6. http://www.grapplearts.com/How-to-Cut-Weight.html

The purpose of a catch-weight is to compensate for the ability of bigger boxers to cut weight before a “day before” fight weigh-in and re-build to a weight more than the specified limit (division or catch-weight) on “day of” the fight with little effects to his performance. The catch weight is not only to provide a level playing field but also to prevent weight mismatches that can endanger the fighters. And more importantly, the catch-weight is to ensure the fight is not canceled due last minute disagreement on fight time.

A case of a weight mismatch is the Arturo Gatti vs Joey Gamache fight. In the controversial fight between Gatti vs Gamache, Gamache's handlers claimed Gatti had gained 19 pounds since the weigh-in the “day before” and thus had a large advantage over Gamache. This resulted in serious injuries to the smaller Gamache. After Gatti-Gamache, some boxing commissions started weighing boxers a second time. [2]5. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arturo_Gatti


Combat sports commonly have defined weight classes with specific weight limits. For example, each boxing division with the exception of heavyweight has its own limits for weight classes, ranging from 105 pounds for minimumweight to 200 pounds for cruiserweight and varying in range in the weight classes in between. In order to fight for a championship in these weight classes the fighters must come in to the fight at or below said weight.

In another example, fighters can agree to fight at a formal weight; however, at weigh-in a fighter can come in over the formal weight. So the fight is not canceled, an agreement may be reached where the fight is made at a catch weight. Commonly, the fighter who comes in overweight pays a penalty - for example a 20% penalty with 10% going to the fighter who made weight and 10% going to a commission sanctioning the fight. An example of this catch weight situation occurred at UFC 104 where Anthony Johnson came in over the welterweight limit of 170 for his fight against Yoshiyuki Yoshida. While commissions sometimes give a one pound grace, Johnson came in at 176. An agreement was made that the fight would occur at a catch weight of 176.[1]http://mmajunkie.com/news/16599/ufc-104-official-weigh-in-results-live-from-the-l-a-live-event-deck.mma

Oftentimes, catch weight fights are still considered fights within a formal weight class. For example, when Manny Pacquiao fought Miguel Cotto, the fight was at a catch weight of 145 pounds to accommodate Pacquiao's smaller physique. Boxing has a junior welterweight weight class with a weight limit of 140 and a welterweight weight class with a weight limit of 147. Since the fight was under the 147 limit and above the 140 limit, the fight was considered a welterweight fight as well as being considered a catch weight fight. In addition, the World Boxing Organization sanctioned this fight for the welterweight title since the fight was under the welterweight limit.[2]http://www.braggingrightscorner.com/guzmancotto111309.html

Catchweight fights can also occur when fighters decide to meet at a weight class limit that is in between the two fighters normal weight classes. For example when Manny Pacquiao fought Oscar De La Hoya the fight took place at the 147lb weight class which is a welterweight fight. But the fighters used the weightclass as a catchweight since De La Hoya was fighting above 147 at the time and Pacquiao was fighting below 147.
Another example was at UFC 99 when Wanderlei Silva fought Rich Franklin at a catch weight bout of 195 pounds. Silva typically fought at the Light Heavyweight weight class of 205 pounds, while Franklin fought at the Middleweight weight class of 185 pounds. They agreed on a catch weight bout, and both men weighed in at 194 for the fight.[3]http://www.ufc.com/news/Official_UFC_99_WeighIn_Results


More detailed explanations:

1. All known “catchweights” in the Old Time era were non title fights and weigh ins were made “day or hours” of the fight, meaning both fighters have almost the same weight in the ring. They fought for the glory and for the money and not for a title.

2. Most of known catchweights in the modern era are title bouts except non-title exhibition matches like the Pac-Dela Hoya Dream Match and those that degenerated to non-title bouts; and matches pitting old warriors fighting for their “retirement benefits”

3. The most glaring difference that can be attributed to “day before” and “day of” fight weigh ins are in comparing the boxing catchweight and MMA catchweight limits. In boxing the catchweight is below the division limit while in MMA the catchweight is above the division limit (or the weight of the fighter who comes heavier and gets penalized so as not to cancel the fight). See Yoshida vs Johnson in above example.

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